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New AI Software Automates ‘Ghost Mannequin’ Images, Promises to Streamline Clothing Photography

New AI Software Automates 'Ghost Mannequin' Images, Promises to Streamline Clothing Photography

Software company autoRetouch has debuted a new software feature that promises to reduce hours of post-production time down to seconds. Automating what is called a “ghost mannequin” photo, the software quickly creates composite images for use in e-commerce.

A Ghost Mannequin image is a photo with a sort of “hollow man” look to it. Ghost Mannequins display the form of clothing on a body without the body actually needing to be shown wearing them. These images are usually created by taking a photo of the clothes being worn from the front and then compositing that image with a separate photo taken of the clothing inside-out, with the label facing the camera. The result is a floating garment that according to autoRetouch makes up about 25% of the fashion retail image market.

New AI Software Automates 'Ghost Mannequin' Images, Promises to Streamline Clothing Photography 1

New AI Software Automates 'Ghost Mannequin' Images, Promises to Streamline Clothing Photography 4

An industry first, autoRetouch’s patent-pending Ghost Mannequin AI component will allow you to upload two images of the same product (product and inlay shot), automate the removal of physical bodies while retaining the shape for a completely transparent figure, and merge the two shots seamlessly.

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New AI Software Automates 'Ghost Mannequin' Images, Promises to Streamline Clothing Photography 10

“The ghost mannequin feature offers automation of complex editing that was never before possible, across any platform, without any significant amount of manual effort,” the company says.

The entire process is browser-based and can be tested on the company’s website right now. If you are the kind of photographer that is responsible for the high-volume, burn-and-turn style production that many clothing brands currently demand, this software stands to save you a ton of time and money if it works like autoRetouch promises.

The ghost mannequin auto edit option is one of a few artificial intelligence-powered features autoRetouch offers. The company also advertises fast background removal and basic automatic skin retouching specifically aimed at the fashion e-commerce market.

The Ghost Mannequin feature is currently available as a demo on autoRetouch.com and will become generally available in early 2021. The company charges a quite affordable $0.10 per-image and doesn’t require a subscription.

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The Nik Collection 25th Anniversary Update Has Some Solid Improvements

The Nik Collection 25th Anniversary Update Has Some Solid Improvements

Has it been 25 years? Amazing. I remember when Nils Kokemohr founded Nik Multimedia in 1995, which later became Nik Software in 2006. The package included plugins for color management and editing, another for enhancing or creating black and white images, sharpening tools, and later HDR software to help photographers increase the dynamic range of their images. 

The company was sold to Google in 2012, and as Google often does, the acquisition languished. In 2017, DxO bought the software, and three years later, brought out a brilliant update that not only enhanced the existing tools, but added some new ones, like a powerful perspective tool that architectural photographers are really liking. DxO also added a non-destructive workflow for Adobe Lightroom users.

Now, we’ve got a nice update to the package, the Nik Collection 3.3. This version includes a pack of 25 brand-new presets for Color Efex Pro and Silver Efex Pro. These 25 exclusive presets are divided into five series, each with five presets: “Classic Portrait Color,” “Classic Portrait Black & White,” “Light & Bright,” “Wildlife,” and “Street.” This update is also compatible with MacOS Big Sur and the 2021 versions of Adobe’s host applications.

As a landscape photographer, I’m most interested in what it offers for my style of photography, and I was pleased at what I found. As a result, I spend a lot of time in Color Efex Pro 4. The Nik presets can be pretty bold, but happily, you can adjust them to taste. As each preset, or recipe, as DxO calls them, consists of multiple adjustments, they are all available to you, and you can save your own take on the adjustments, creating your own recipe. I also like that when you are finished, you have the changes as a separate layer, and I find myself sometimes adjusting the opacity of the Nik layer and letting the base layer show through. 

I gave the updated software a try, running it on PS 2021 and with my Mac on Big Sur. Everything worked smoothly with no surprises. DxO works on PCs as well.

I had a nice sunrise image at Bryce Canyon taken a couple of years ago, and using the presets, I got it to a nice place to my eye. As usual, I adjusted the recipe to my own taste and I liked the look.

The Nik Collection 25th Anniversary Update Has Some Solid Improvements 13It was a whole new take on the image, and Color Efex 4 encouraged me to see the image in a new way.

The Nik Collection 25th Anniversary Update Has Some Solid Improvements 14

I tried some of the new recipes included in the 3.3 update, and also found some interesting things I could try with the image, again making my own adjustments to the preset.

The Nik Collection 25th Anniversary Update Has Some Solid Improvements 15The Nik Collection has been an able assistant for thousands of photographers all over the world. This latest update makes sure it will run on this latest Mac OS, and the entire suite of tools will benefit portrait photographers as well, as this latest collection has many tools to enhance that form of photography. Plus there are some great tools for black and whte photography.

Nik Collection 3.3 by DxO (Windows and MacOS) is now available for download on the DxO website for $149 for the full version and $79 for the upgrade. 

Users who purchased Nik Collection 3 by DxO after June 2020 may upgrade their software for free. Photographers who already own Nik Collection 2 By DxO or a previous version can upgrade their software by signing into their customer accounts. A fully functional, one-month trial version of Nik Collection 3.3 by DxO is available on the DxO website, and I recommend that, because when you can actually see how it works, I think you will want the Nik Collection in your editing software toolbag. 

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : remnants of a previous life

johnriley1uk's latest blog : cool activities on the streets of manchester

Remnants of a Previous Life

25 Nov 2020 3:54PM  
Views : 97
Unique : 82

I was just musing, and there’s plenty of time to do that in Lockdown, that considering I was involved in Dentistry for most of four decades, there were only a few random fragments of that left around. I used to sell materials and equipment to the Dental Profession and as a consequence samples and demo items accumulate. I don’t throw things away, so I wondered what was left. There are a couple of Espe Elastomer Spatulas, used for mixing impression materials, that have been used as butter knives for many years, but they don’t count as they are still in daily use.

The Kurers, highly respected Manchester based dentists get a couple of mentions. This is an over-size model of their Kurer K4 Anchor, a post sytem for restoring teeth.
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and this is the Kurer Ceramicolor Contact Point instrument, used with composite materials.
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It’s a random and maybe interesting fact that Hans and Peter Kurers’ aunt, Margaret Stone, was my first primary school teacher.

I still have a few dental instruments, in a nice leather folder that was obtained for me by the distributer. It’s too good to throw away!
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Models of crowns and bridges for demo purposes.
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Some gorgeous catalogues of instruments and rotary instruments that again are too good to dispose of. Here’s three of them.
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And finally an advertising campaign for exciting false teeth in the form of a postcard sent out to dentists in 1954. It’s an odd one, printed of course but pretending to be hand written and both daring and cutting edge and yet quaintly old-fashioned, all at the same time. This predates when I was working by many years, but was given to me by one of my customers as an item of interest. I still have it, so the gesture was clearly appreciated.
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Meanwhile, I could do with a couple of replacement Espe Elastomer Spatulas (aka Impregum Spatulas) as my two “butter knives” are wearing out, so if anyone is listening…….Smile

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 3 November 2020

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 3 November 2020

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

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Competitions

Cutlery

© Leedslass1

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to Leedslass1 (Day 18  – Cutlery) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 17

‘City Light’

 

Day 19

Different Angle

A Bit More Selfie Fun

 

Day 20 

Fun

 

Day 21

Ice’

Winter is coming

 

Day 22

Bad Weather

 

Day 23

HDR

Marble church, Bodelwyddan

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
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Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Fujifilm Announces GFX100 IR, a Forensics-Focused Infrared Camera

Fujifilm Announces GFX100 IR, a Forensics-Focused Infrared Camera

Fujifilm Announces GFX100 IR, a Forensics-Focused Infrared Camera 16

Fujifilm has announced a unique, specialized version of the GFX100 camera. Still insisting on calling it a “large format” camera, this latest version can shoot infrared images at either 100 or 400 megapixels thanks to newly-added pixel shift functionality.

Fujifilm says that the images shot with the GFX100 IR allow you to see details in images that are not visible to the naked human eye. For example, the company says, “this can be important to in helping to identify counterfeit documents.” Additionally, it can be useful for those working in cultural preservation as the infrared spectrum can be used to analyze pigments in historical artifacts or works of art.

Fujifilm’s latest firmware update allows for Pixel Shift Multi-Shot which is particularly useful for archival and forensics work, like the company bills this camera as suited for. It’s compatible with Capture One means that images can be shot while tethered and from the same angle of view, repeatedly.

Below are a few examples of what a normal image would reveal, followed by what can be seen when shot in infrared:

Fujifilm Announces GFX100 IR, a Forensics-Focused Infrared Camera 19
Image shot normally.
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Image captured in infrared.
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Image shot normally.
Fujifilm Announces GFX100 IR, a Forensics-Focused Infrared Camera 28
Image captured in infrared.

Different IR filters can be used in front of the lens to make images at different wavelengths which in turn reveal different details. Using the appropriate IR cut filter will allow GFX100 IR to be used normally – that is to say, in the same manner as the standard GFX100 digital camera – to traditional color images within the visible spectrum.

The GFX100 IR will not be made available to the general public or for personal use, instead only available by specific Fujifilm authorized retailers for the use in forensic, scientific, and cultural preservation applications.

“Sales of GFX100 IR will be subject to a GFX100 IR User Agreement, which sets out the specific terms of use for the camera,” Fujifilm says in a press release.

The GFX100 IR is currently expected to be available in the first quarter of 2021. No price was listed as a part of the announcement.

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How To Get Professional Results With One Strobe on a Tiny Budget

How To Get Professional Results With One Strobe on a Tiny Budget

If, like me, you are pondering asking Santa for some lighting gear for Christmas to start putting together a home studio, check out this short video to show you what can be achieved through a very simple setup that’s very affordable.

Manny Ortiz has put together this quick piece behind-the-scenes insight into what’s possible with just a single umbrella and a comparatively cheap strobe — not too dissimilar to this video from Pye Jirsa a few days ago.

If you’re drawing up a list, don’t forget to budget for light stands. A C-stand will give you a ton of flexibility, but what might surprise you is that even a cheap C-stand could cost you more than the Godox V860 II that Ortiz uses in this video. Being able to position your lights is key to getting good results, and consider that a C-stand will offer a lot more versatility than a basic light stand. Keep in mind that you’ll also need a sandbag to stop it from falling over.

The Bowens adapter is a good shout from Ortiz, as it gives you the option to attach a vast range of modifiers which will prove useful in the future when you go on to add softboxes and more.

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Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control

Appearing toward the end of March 2020, the Huawei P40 Pro lands between the P40 and the P40 Pro+ in Huawei’s flagship lineup. Equipped with a Kirin 990 5G chipset, 8GB of RAM and a choice among 128, 256 or 512 GB of storage, the solidly-built smartphone runs EMUI 10.1 (based on the Android 10 OS), and is also rated IP68 for dust and water resistance.

Key display specifications:

  • 6.58-inch OLED screen (~91.6% screen-to-body ratio)
  • Dimensions: 158.2 x 72.6 x 9 mm (6.23 x 2.86 x 0.35 inches)
  • Resolution: 1200 x 2640 pixels (~441 ppi)
  • Aspect ratio: 19.8:9
  • Refresh rate: 90 Hz

About DXOMARK Display tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone and other display reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective and perceptual tests under controlled lab and real-life conditions. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. Note that we evaluate display attributes using only the device’s built-in display hardware and its still image (gallery) and video apps at their default settings. (For in-depth information about how we evaluate smartphone and other displays, check out our article, “How DXOMARK tests display quality.”)

Test summary

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 31Huawei P40 Pro

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 32

85

display

An overall score of 85 places the Huawei P40 Pro in the upper half of our Display rankings, where it just edges out last year’s Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max at 84, but fails to secure a spot on the podium among all the devices we’ve tested so far. In large measure this is due to its readability performance, with results that are too dark in both indoor and outdoor conditions for truly comfortable viewing. Further, although its readability in very low light and nighttime conditions was adequate, it was still a bit on the dark side; with the blue light filter on, however, it was only marginally better than the Apple iPhone 12 Pro — which is to say, essentially unreadable.

On the other hand, its still-image color performance was good overall. Where it really stood out, however, was for its class-leading achievement in our motion sub-category, where it exhibited excellent control of motion blur; moreover, its video playback was instantaneous. It struggled a bit with touch, however, and it lost points for its obtrusive notch and poor handling of aliasing artifacts (particularly noticeable in our gaming use case).

Let’s take a look at the details.

Analyses and comparisons

The DXOMARK Display overall score of 85 for the Huawei P40 Pro is derived from its scores across six categories: readability, color, video, motion, touch, and artifacts. In this section, we’ll take a closer look at these display quality sub-scores and explain what they mean for the user, and we will compare the Huawei P40 Pro’s performance in several areas against some of its key flagship competitors, the OnePlus 8 Pro, the Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, and the Apple iPhone 12 Pro.

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Readability

DXOMARK uses the device’s gallery app to show static (still image) content when measuring the device’s display for brightness, contrast, gamma, and blue light impact, etc.

As you know, the most important aspect of a display is how easily you can read the content in various ambient lighting conditions, and in this respect, the P40 Pro falls short of the best devices in our database, as its display tends to be too dark both indoors and out.

Brightness vs Contrast comparison (0 Lux)

Brightness vs Contrast comparison (30 000 Lux)

Outdoors, the P40 Pro’s readability is impaired because of a significant lack of luminance. While it is nearly always the case that smartphones have difficulties in bright outdoor lighting conditions, the Huawei device really struggles to keep an acceptable level of contrast, whereas the other phones’ renderings show more detail overall, as you can see in the photo comparison below.

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 35

Bright outdoor conditions, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

In another example, this time in sunlight, the detail in the darker parts of the P40 Pro image is harder to see (take a good look at the very dark seedbed in the middle of the sunflower).

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 36

Outdoors under sunlight, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Indoors, the P40 Pro’s lack of brightness is apparent, particularly when compared to the OnePlus 8 Pro and the Note20 Ultra in the middle; and even though the iPhone 12 Pro image is also dark, it maintains more visible detail than the P40 Pro.

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 37

Indoors, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Further, the Huawei P40 Pro is slow to respond to falling light conditions, and instead of doing so smoothly, shows a step toward the end of the transition. And when moving from sunlight into shade, there is a noticeable step as the gamma boost fades in response to the darker ambient conditions.

On the plus side, the P40 Pro has basically good brightness uniformity. Yes, there is a slight non-uniformity in its central area compared to along the sides of the screen, and there is slight horizontal shadow alongside the notch, but overall, the non-uniformities are hard to spot. (You can see an illustration of this in the discussion about uniformity in the Color section further below.)

The P40 Pro’s performance when held at an angle is quite normal, as shown in our chart of objective test results: 

Brightness vs Angle comparison

However, the overarching problem is that the P40 Pro is too dark to begin with. Again, here is the same array of smartphone images shot on axis in indoor lighting conditions:

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 37

Indoor brightness on-axis, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Our perceptual tests for brightness vs angle confirm the objective test results. Though all the devices in our comparison lose some luminance when held at a 45° angle, the P40 Pro’s loss of brightness and subsequent impact on readability is very apparent, especially at lower gray levels:

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 39

Indoor brightness at 45°, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

The low luminance combined with the angular loss make the Huawei device barely readable.

All is not negative, however: people who are particularly sensitive to too-bright displays in dark ambient conditions will appreciate the P40 Pro’s luminance in those circumstances — it’s just a bit on the dark side, but still easily readable. (The Note20 Ultra, by contrast, is a tad too bright.)

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 40

Brightness in nighttime viewing conditions, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Unfortunately, when the BLF is turned on, the P40 Pro loses brightness and becomes hard to read without effort, though it is easier to see than the iPhone.

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Brightness with BLF on, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 42

Color

DXOMARK uses the device’s gallery app to show static (still image) content when measuring the device’s display for white point, gamut, uniformity, color fidelity, and blue light filter impact, etc. 

Color on the Huawei P40 Pro was a strong point, though its performance remains behind that of the OnePlus 8 Pro, whose score of 88 puts it in first place. Unlike some phones, the device does not correct its white point when the illuminant changes, but this is a minor concern. Of greater concern is that under indoor lighting conditions, a pink cast can be visible, which affects the color rendering in some images (though skin tones appear less impacted). In the photo array below, the P40 Pro’s rendering of the sunflowers is reasonably pleasant, if arguably a bit too saturated for the ambient conditions. (You can see this saturation in the red-orange areas surrounding the dark central seedbed.)

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 43

Indoor color, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Viewed outdoors, however, the Huawei’s colors are not only darker, but appear somewhat washed out, and a slight green cast becomes visible.

Huawei P40 Pro Display review: Class-leading motion control 36

Outdoor color, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

In terms of color fidelity, the charts below shows the color tendencies and the direction of the color shift as the P40 Pro tilts when under 1000 lux lighting in both the sRGB (standard) color space (left) and the broader DCI-P3 color space (left). The center of each circle is the target color; anything outside the circle represents a noticeable color difference. The further the tip of the arrow is outside of the circle, the more a user will notice the difference between the color on the display and color of the real object or chart next to it. As you can see, the P40 Pro shows some weaknesses in both color spaces.

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Huawei P40 Pro, color fidelity at 1000 lux in the sRGB color space

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Huawei P40 Pro, color fidelity at 1000 lux in the DCI-P3 color space

The P40 Pro screen is quite uniform overall except right next to its notch, and it shows a very minor purple-green shift as well. The most noticeably non-uniform device is the OnePlus 8 Pro, which not only shows distinct bands emanating from its corner notch, but also shows very pronounced color differences. The Note20 Ultra 5G also has a significant color gradient from its greenish bottom left corner to its reddish top right corner (its much brighter image in the array below makes its non-uniformity a bit hard to see). The best among the group is the iPhone 12 Pro on the far right: it is very uniform except for some darkening on both sides of its notch.

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Color uniformity, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

White (color) vs angle

Users sometimes hold their smartphones at an angle, which can affect display color rendering. The left-hand chart below shows the Huawei P40 Pro’s color tendencies when held at an angle; in the right-hand chart (essentially a closeup of the left chart), each dot represents a measurement taken at a discrete angle and distance from the device; dots inside the inner circle exhibit no color shift in angle; those between the inner and outer circle have shifts that are just noticeable by trained experts; but those falling outside the outer circle are noticeable. For the P40 Pro, you can see that as it tilts, it first shifts into pink territory before heading into yellow-green as the angle becomes more acute.

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White point on angle, Huawei P40 Pro

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White point on angle scatter, Huawei P40 Pro

The photos below of our perceptual tests back up the objective measurements. The top set is shot on axis (perpendicular to the viewer); the second set is shot at a 45° angle. On axis, the Huawei device has a very noticeable pink cast:

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Indoor color on axis, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

On angle, not only does the P40 Pro lose some brightness, but its pink cast has shifted towards yellow-orange:

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Indoor color at 45°, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Finally, with the blue light filter on, color on the P40 Pro becomes just a bit yellow; while not unpleasant, the shift does nothing to help its readability, which remains too dark overall.

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Color shift with BLF on, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

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Video

DXOMARK uses the device’s video (or browser) app to show dynamic content when measuring the device’s display for brightness, contrast, gamma, and color.

Video was rather a disappointment on the Huawei P40 Pro, with the main complaint similar to that for readability above — its default brightness setting is simply too low for comfortably watching movies. Further, contrast is low when watching HDR10 content, especially when compared to the iPhone 12 Pro, which is the best among this group. In contrast to the Apple screen grab in which you can see quite a bit of detail not just in the highlights, but also in the dark backgrounds in the comparison below, detail on the P40 Pro goes AWOL in the darkest shades, its highlights are not bright at all, and the overall appearance is dull and lackluster — yet another consequence of its persistently dark rendering.

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Video contrast, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Unsurprisingly, the P40 Pro’s dark rendering also has an impact on video color generally. As you can see in the frame below, its rendering doesn’t come close to the punch and vibrancy of the other phones’ images — though in fairness, the Apple frame on the far right is aversely impacted by a strong yellow cast. (By the way, this same impression of desaturated and dull colors in P40 Pro videos carries over into skin tone rendering as well.)

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Video color, from left to right: Huawei P40 Pro, OnePlus 8 Pro, Samsung Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G, Apple iPhone 12 Pro

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Motion

The Huawei P40 Pro’s score for motion is the best among all devices we have tested thus far, showing little to no stuttering at either 30 fps or 60 fps when playing UHD-HDR10 content. As for motion blur, the P40 Pro shows no frame duplications and appears consistently sharp. And in other good news, after you move the forward/rewind slider, videos restart instantaneously — something quite a few other devices (even flagship devices) have trouble with.

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Touch

Thanks to its 90 Hz refresh rate, the P40 Pro is accurate when zooming in the gallery app, and it is smooth in the gallery app, when browsing the web, and when gaming. Where it loses points is for accuracy in our gaming scenario, because some areas of the screen — notably the bottom corners— do not detect long touches, which significantly impacts the user experience.

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Artifacts

Just like other phones with prominent notches, the P40 Pro lost points for the impact of its notch on the user experience, which our testers found intrusive when watching videos and especially when gaming.

With a refresh rate of 90 Hz, flicker is not a particular problem for the Huawei device. (And although it is out of the scope of our current protocol, and thus not something our engineers tested, it’s worth mentioning that the P40 Pro comes with a no-flicker feature that significantly reduces perceived flicker.)

The Huawei P40 Pro has no problems with either ghost touches or judder; however, it does show significant aliasing in our gaming use case, as you can see in the comparison below between it and the best among the comparison group, the Apple iPhone 12 Pro.

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Huawei P40 Pro, aliasing closeup

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Apple iPhone 12 Pro, aliasing closeup

Conclusion

While it has good control of motion and shows acceptable color overall, these strong points may not be enough to compensate for the Huawei P40 Pro’s problems with aliasing, touch accuracy, and smoothness, and especially for its darker than average default brightness settings. This lack of luminance affects display readability both indoors and outdoors, and heavily impacts its video sub-score as well.

Pros

  • Color rendering is pleasant and accurate in still images.
  • Motion rendering is excellent, in particular frame drop performance and control of motion blur.
  • Luminance level is adapted to night reading (except when BLF is on).

Cons

  • Brightness levels are low indoors and outdoors, except in low-light conditions.
  • Video performance is disappointing, especially brightness level and gamma management.
  • Touch accuracy is low on the sides and especially in the bottom corners.
  • Aliasing is noticeable when gaming.

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Low key

dudler's latest blog : mirrorless - and why they?re (arguably) better


Low key 61

Let’s start with a definition: a low-key picture which has predominantly darker tones. It isn’t just underexposure: most successful high-key pictures have a few small areas of brightness –…

Low key 62 Low key 63 Low key 64 Low key 65

Low key 66

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Fujifilm Adds Pixel Shift Multi-Shot to GFX100, Enabling 400 MP Capture

Fujifilm Adds Pixel Shift Multi-Shot to GFX100, Enabling 400 MP Capture

Fujifilm Adds Pixel Shift Multi-Shot to GFX100, Enabling 400 MP Capture 67

Fujifilm has announced a firmware update the brings pixel shift multi-shot functionality to the GFX100. The camera combines with newly-announced software to combine 16 RAW images into a single 400-megapixel image.

The feature works by combining the 102-megapixel sensor, the X Processor 4, and the in-body image stabilization system to move the image sensor in 0.5 pixel increments and record high-resolution RGB pixel information over the course of a 16 image capture.

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Fujifilm Adds Pixel Shift Multi-Shot to GFX100, Enabling 400 MP Capture 73

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The images can then be fed into new software to produce a single 400-megapixel DNG file.

Fujifilm’s new software is called Pixel Shift Combiner and not only acts as the necessary piece of the puzzle to create the large images, but it also can be used to facilitate capture capability when using Pixel Shift Multi-Shot. With this new feature, Fujifilm says that images can be created that “faithfully reproduce nearly every detail” and “achieve optimal image quality with 400 megapixels of resolution.”

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Fujifilm says that this feature is particularly useful for archival or cultural preservation work, where photographers must document the intricate details of historical artifacts or works of art. The technology was implemented in the GFX100 IR, which adds the element of infrared into archival and forensic image capture.

This technology also has implications for product photography work. In an example, see below in this image provided by Fujifilm, shot by Koenigsegg and Dan Kang:

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Without using the Pixel Shift Multi-Shot, a 100% crop would provide this level of detail:

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But the additional megapixels from the Pixel Shift allows for considerably more resolution. This is a 100% crop from the 400 megapixel file:

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As expected, increasing the pixel count dramatically balloons the file size. A JPEG of the original 100 megapixel file is a hefty 51.5 megabytes. The 400-megapixel version is a whopping 204.9 megabytes and took considerably more time to work with in Adobe Photoshop.

In addition to the Pixel Shift Multi-Shot feature, Fujifilm made a few other changes to the GFX100 in Firmware Version 3.00. First, ratings to images recorded in the [Jpeg + RAW] mode are applied to both Jpeg and RAW files now. The company also resolved a phenomenon where in multiple-flash shooting scenarios where the EF-X500 is used as a commander, flashes in some groups sometimes didn’t fire correctly. The company also promises that the accuracy of the Eye AF function for the front eye has been improved. Fujifilm also lists that they addressed other “minor bugs.”

The new firmware is available now and can be downloaded here.


Image credits: Car photo by Koenigsegg and Dan Kang and used with permission.

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What Is the Best 50mm Lens for Canon Shooters?

What Is the Best 50mm Lens for Canon Shooters?

Canon shooters are not without options when it comes to 50mm lenses, with a huge range of different optics at varying price points and image quality. This excellent video review takes a look at three of the best options out there, the EF 50mm f/1.2L USM, RF 50mm f/1.2L USM, and the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art.

Coming to you from Christopher Frost Photography, this great video review compares the the EF 50mm f/1.2L USMRF 50mm f/1.2L USM, and the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art. A 50mm lens is one of the most versatile and popular optics out there across a wide range of genres, offering a very neutral focal length suitable for half-body portraits and walkaround work and a wide aperture suitable for both low-light work and narrow depth of field. The great thing about Canon mirrorless cameras is that they adapt EF mount lenses very well, allowing you to draw on the immense library of 50mm lenses made for their DSLR mount should the price of the superlative but extremely expensive RF 50mm f/1.2L be too much for you. Check out the video above for Frost’s full thoughts on each lens. 

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