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Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish.

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish.

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 1

Over the past 4 days, tens of thousands of photographers have come together to access thousands of dollars in amazing resources and have raised $75,000 for charity. You only have 24 hours left to join them and save as much as 96% on photography tools and training created by renowned industry pros.

With over 20 of the most highly acclaimed photographers and creative brands from around the world having contributed products to The 2021 Photography Bundle from 5DayDeal, there is something in there for every level and every type of photographer. Tens of thousands of creatives have already raced to grab one of the 3 bundle options in the past 4 days. Those who choose to join them in the next 24 hours will benefit from a 96% savings and get $2200+ in resources for as low as $89 (upgraded bundles can also be obtained for $128 and $157).

See all 2021 Photography Bundle options here.

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 2

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 3

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Aside from amazing products and incredible value, what else can you expect from a 5DayDeal bundle?

With every 5DayDeal Photography Bundle, users receive:

  • Instant access to all courses and tools for download and streaming for a full year.
  • 3 full months to register for partner products not available for download or streaming.
  • Lifetime access to a year-round password-protected page filled with discounts and freebies for creatives.
  • Membership to a customer Facebook group, where you can learn from and network with other photographers.
  • 5DayDeal Guarantee—no item will EVER be repeated in another 5DayDeal bundle.
  • Unlimited customer support (and their support team is AMAZING).

Purchasers of this year’s bundles can get as many as 285 educational tutorials, demonstrations, and masterclasses; over 11,000 presets, tools, actions, brushes, and overlays; and nearly 550 practice images. Additional perks include creative solutions, digital magazines and ebooks, access to a website with exclusive photography resources, and so much more.

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 5

With just 24 hours left for photographers to capture this incredible deal, the 5DayDeal team is expecting trends to follow in the pattern of previous sales, meaning a huge spike in traffic to the site. While they have taken every possible measure to optimize the site for handling such traffic rushes without lags, we recommend you don’t wait until the last minute to obtain your bundle because once the sale ends at noon tomorrow, this exclusive bundle will be gone forever.

Why is this bundle priced so low?

5DayDeal curates bundles for creatives and business owners and offers them at extreme discounts for two main reasons:

1. An organization created by photographers, the 5DayDeal owners truly understand how expensive it can be to obtain high-quality training and tools to stay abreast of this industry’s everchanging trends and technology. They wanted to ensure every photographer could get the resources they need to experience continuous growth without breaking the bank. That’s why they work year-round to find top-of-the-line products to include in these photography bundles and have marked them down anywhere from 95 to 97 percent.

2. Bundles like this one have enabled 5DayDeal to distribute over $2 Million in funds to a plethora of charities since 2014. Bringing together dozens of contributors can reach more people and raise more money with this creative approach to collaborative philanthropy. This bundle, alone, has already raised $75,000 in funds, and with one day remaining, they are hoping to bring in at least another $25,000 to distribute amongst organizations making meals and education possible for underprivileged children and families around the world.

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 6

Photographers seeking professional and/or artistic growth mark their calendars for these sales each year to ensure they don’t miss them. The collection of materials is only offered for 5 days, and once they are gone, this unique combination of resources is never offered again. Past purchasers note the extreme value they obtained due to the high quality of resources and bargain pricing. This year’s bundle event ends at noon Pacific time tomorrow, October 19th.

Take a look at this incredible assortment of products included in this year’s Complete Photography Bundle!

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 7

Don’t miss your chance to experience creative and professional growth in your craft while joining hundreds of thousands of photographers in this philanthropic effort! Get the unique set of resources found in The 2021 Photography Bundle before it disappears forever on October 19th at noon PST.

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 5

5DayDeal is also giving away over $10,000 in photography gear and resources. Sign up for your chance to win. No purchase is necessary to win and no strings attached!

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 9

Popular Photography Event Ends Soon! Your Chance to Save 96% on Photo Resources Will Vanish. 5


Full disclosure: This article was brought to you by 5DayDeal.

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5 Reasons to Choose Capture One Over Adobe Lightroom

5 Reasons to Choose Capture One Over Adobe Lightroom

If you’re not a fan of Adobe’s subscription plans or find that editing your photos isn’t quite as quick as you’d like, you might want to consider checking out Capture One. Here are five reasons to make the move and five more reasons to stick with Lightroom.

Justin McDonough of Dunna Did It has put together all of the reasons why he switched from Lightroom to Capture One, and it makes a pretty compelling list. If you’re pondering what the competition is like, keep in mind that you can try Capture One for 30 days, and you don’t need to submit any payment details in order to get started. There’s also Capture One Express, a free version with fewer features designed specifically for use with Fujifilm or Sony cameras.

The ability to create layers in Capture One gives you a lot more power and control, though Lightroom is about to catch up by introducing some layering options of its own in an update that’s due to go live on October 26. Some would argue that this upgrade is long overdue, and it will be interesting to see how Adobe’s new features compare.

Which do you prefer and why? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

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Art Wolfe on his approach to night photography

Art Wolfe African lion is shown in the muted light of evening in Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya

October 18, 2021

Art Wolfe has been photographing after dark for decades. He exclusively reveals to David Clark what attracts him to the nocturnal world and why is he enjoying shooting it more than ever


‘I’m battling raccoons right now,’ says Art Wolfe over a Zoom call from his home in Seattle, USA. ‘I’ve got koi carp in a pond in my garden and the raccoons come up out of the ravine below my house to get them. I was up until about 1am last night, chasing raccoons away. They’re a pain in the ass. They’re cute, but they love to eat fish. I’m at war with nature,’ he laughs.

It’s not the expected start to an interview with one of the world’s most famous nature photographers. Art may have just passed his 70th birthday, but he’s as energetic, unpredictable and candid as ever. Art has been photographing wildlife, landscapes and people for over 45 years and during a highly successful career has shot over two million images.

He has maintained a packed travel schedule throughout his working life, barely arriving home from one far-flung trip before setting off on another. Before coronavirus arrived, he regularly travelled for more than nine months every year.

Milky Way over a row of moai on Easter Island (Rapa Nui), in the south-eastern Pacific Ocean

A dramatic shot of the Milky Way over a row of moai on Easter Island (Rapa Nui), in the south-eastern Pacific Ocean

Even the Covid-19 situation hasn’t stemmed the flow of restless energy that drives him. ‘The pandemic has not slowed me down,’ he says. ‘All last year I created 27 lectures (each lecture 90-minutes long) on Pathways to Creativity that we put on Vimeo.

As long as my life is busy and my brain is active, I’m a happy camper whether I’m in Africa or North America. I’m still finding great things to do and great new subjects to shoot.’

Earlier this year Art went on safari to Kenya and for the past two months has taught back-to-back workshops in North America. He’s just come back from snorkelling with whale sharks and giant manta rays off the coast of Mexico.

He’s currently trying to run tours to Africa, Mongolia and Madagascar, but keeps having to delay them because of the pandemic’s travel restrictions, although he’s fully vaccinated and requires the same from his participants.

leopard in an ancient thorn tree in Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa by Art Wolfe

This shot of a leopard in an ancient thorn tree in Chobe National Park, Botswana, Africa is one of Art’s favourites in Night on Earth. ‘I love shots where the animal is just part of the overall landscape,’ he says

Art’s keen to resume these tours. ‘My entire life has been about managing risk,’ he continues. ‘I started off as a kid that was always rummaging around in the forest and jumping off trees and crossing rivers. I was formally trained in mountaineering, went on an Everest expedition, went up to K2 and went into Pakistan even after the first Gulf War.

‘I always have been empowered to travel the world, to go into any city on Earth and walk the back streets and not feel like a victim or fearful of other humans. My parents always taught me to be self-reliant and confident, and that was the best thing they ever instilled in me.’

Over the years, Art has maintained a steady flow of books and has so far produced more than 120, including Migrations: Wildlife in Motion (1994), Vanishing Act (2006), which explored camouflage in nature, and his epic ‘mid-career retrospective’ Earth is My Witness (2014). He currently has seven more books at different stages of completion.

northern saw-whet owl

This northern saw-whet owl was photographed while preparing to leave its nesting cavity in a tree in Washington, USA

Night on Earth

His latest book, Night on Earth, is a wide-ranging collection of travel images made in the hours between dusk and dawn. Taken in a variety of locations worldwide including Alaska, Namibia, Malaysia, India and the Galapagos Islands, it features landscapes, starscapes, wildlife, natural phenomena such as volcanoes and waterfalls, indigenous peoples, cities and more.

So why has Art chosen to focus on night photography for this book? What is it that intrigues him about it and what special photographic opportunities does it offer? ‘Whenever I shoot, first and foremost, I’m trying to affect the emotions of the audience,’ Art explains.

‘In the past, when giving a talk, I could wow my audience with amazing shots of things like the Patagonian Massifs, but today people start to yawn because they’ve already seen 10,000 of those images. It’s getting harder to wow anybody with a more traditional landscape. So, part of the motivation was to include the element of darkness and to capture the landscape in a slightly different way.’

Art Wolfe African lion is shown in the muted light of evening in Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya

Shooting between dusk and dawn gives images a unique atmosphere. Here, an African lion is shown in the muted light of evening in Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya

Part of the attraction for Art was the sense of mystery that the night brings. ‘If you can capture, for instance, a mountain lion at dusk, starting to stalk an animal, that already implies some people’s worst fears,’ he says. ‘It’s already affecting people’s emotions. The subject has this inherent interest already ingrained.

I love that sense of going into the dark and coming away with an image that isn’t just silhouetted darkness. That, for me, was the challenge.’ For most of his books, Art usually goes through the same process when compiling them. After initially coming up with the concept, he and his staff search through his vast archive to see if there are enough core images to draw from.

All the travel that’s involved in covering a wide range of subjects and locations means it’s not financially viable to shoot all new images for books. ‘Then, once a base is established, I work like hell for the next three or four years and usually end up replacing most of the images that we initially thought would be good,’ he reveals.

Milky Way over Mount Baker in Mount Baker Wilderness, Washington, USA by Art Wolfe

A spectacular shot of the Milky Way over Mount Baker in Mount Baker Wilderness, Washington, USA

‘I don’t want a book to come out that looks like a lot of old photos. For the most part I’m shooting new work and using the abilities of the latest cameras to take in what we could never have shot before.’

Although a small number of the images in the book were shot on film SLR cameras and have stood the test of time, many of them were taken on the latest digital kit including the Canon EOS R5, which is currently his main camera. ‘I love it,’ he enthuses. ‘The whole technology of the mirrorless camera permits much smaller lenses.

‘For instance, when I was in Kenya earlier this year, I was handholding an RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1 lens and very easily capturing animals. Then I could add a 1.4x extender and suddenly I have a 700mm lens that’s very easy to hold. I’m not a gym queen, so handholding and shooting animals without a tripod really makes capturing the ephemeral moment so much easier.’

One way he has taken advantage of the greatly improved high ISO performance of today’s cameras has been to shoot starscapes in a way that was not previously possible. ‘Historically, if I’d wanted to shoot a night-time shot that includes the stars, they would all be star trails,’ confirms Art.

Art Wolfe Dolomites, South Tyrol, Italy

Dawn breaks over a landscape dotted with hay barns in the Dolomites, South Tyrol, Italy

‘With film, you could never take a fast enough shutter speed to show the stars were just pinpoints of light. Those star trail images can be spectacular but can get a little shallow in terms of the depth of the image. ‘Today, with high ISOs, I have been able to shoot amazingly detailed images of the Milky Way as part of night-time landscapes.

Higher-ISO cameras are enabling us to photograph landscapes and the heavens like never before. I think that’s a great advancement and I only see it getting more and more that way.’ Almost all Art’s dusk-to-dawn images have been shot using only ambient light, including those of traditional ceremonies in countries including India, Botswana and Ethiopia.

He prefers to increase his ISO and use traditional oil lamps, candle light and fire light to illuminate these scenes. ‘The ones I’m really proud of are the cultural shots lit with candle light or fire light. They’re so much more intimate and romantic, and in keeping with nature and the landscape, than they would be if shot using flash. Most of the time in these situations flash is too harsh and invasive.’

Light pollution

Part of Night on Earth’s purpose, as is made clear in the text, is to highlight the issue of light pollution and how it’s affecting both wildlife and people as well as wasting resources.

As Ruskin Hartley of the International Dark-Sky Association writes in the foreword, ‘Light pollution is destroying natural darkness with severe consequences: It is linked to a global insect decline, the death of millions of migrating birds, increased carbon emissions and increased disease in humans.’

eruption of Bárðarbunga, a subglacial stratovolcano in Vatnajökull National Park, Iceland. by Art Wolfe

A lava flow glows vividly in this night-time shot of an eruption of Bárðarbunga, a subglacial stratovolcano in Vatnajökull National Park, Iceland

The last photographs Art made for the book show the spectacular, star-filled night sky at the Natural Bridges National Monument in Utah, USA, which, in 2007, became the first of the country’s International Dark Sky Parks, which are specifically protected from light pollution.

At a time of climate emergency, Art says he’s often asked why his photographs focus on the beauty of nature and don’t show degraded environments, decimated species, or evidence of pollution. ‘The answer is I want to make a beautiful book to lure people in to where the organisations with which we align can tell their story,’ he explains.

‘It’s my honour to produce books in a way that brings people in and then we deliver the message, as opposed to books that show nothing but carnage. Very few people really are going to buy books on something that’s depressing, because we have enough issues that stress people out already.’

As for his future work, there’s no chance that entering his eighth decade is going to slow Art down. ‘My friends recently brought up the fact that I’m turning 70,’ he says. ‘We’re all within a year of each other. People say, “Oh my god, it’s a big birthday, it really makes you think”. But I live in denial and I’m not going to give it a thought. Birthdays are almost irrelevant to me.

fishermen cast their nets on the Irrawaddy River in Mandalay, Myanmar

In the warm evening light, fishermen cast their nets on the Irrawaddy River in Mandalay, Myanmar

‘My belief is, don’t look in the mirror, just look outward, think about the next project. Life is moving fast for all of us, but I don’t want to start thinking about how much time I have left and all that. People ask me when I’m going to slow down and retire, but artists don’t retire. I just want to drop wherever I am.’


Art Wolfe’s low-light tips

Based on his experience, Art shares the advice he would give others for shooting in low light

1. Think out of the box

‘Most people, whether taking low-light shots or otherwise, are literally putting their tripods in the holes made by the previous person to shoot that place. Look for new ways and new angles to approach the subject.’

2. Invest in the latest equipment

‘If it’s within your price range, the high ISO capability of the latest camera bodies, such as the Canon EOS R5, makes a big difference when shooting in low light, allowing you to capture subjects that were not previously possible.’

3. Understand animal behaviour

‘When photographing wildlife on the margins at dusk, it’s essential that you familiarise yourself with the behaviour of the subject that you want to go after. For example, you locate some predators by listening to the calls of their prey.’

4. Don’t be afraid to include motion blur

‘As long as there’s an element in the frame that’s sharp for the eye to depart from, shots that include motion blur can often be the most effective and creative.’

5. Noise isn’t a big issue

‘For me, a little noise in low-light shots is not a bad thing, so long as you’ve got the image. Noise can be akin to grain, which often creates something artistic.’

6. But for noise-free images…

‘If I’m trying to get the clearest, sharpest image without noise, I will use the latest cameras and typically will shoot starscapes, for example, somewhere around ISO 1600 with an aperture of f/1.4 or sometimes f/2.8 for around 10-20 seconds. Then I use Topaz noise-reduction software in post.’

Night on Earth: Photographs by Art Wolfe is published by Earth Aware Editions, price £35. See www.artwolfe.com. Amateur Photographer readers can also enjoy a 25% discount off ‘Pathways to Creativity’. See events.artwolfe.com/pathways and use the code AP25.


Further reading

Night landscape photography

Nature and nurture: Art Wolfe on his approach to photography

Art Wolfe 1951-present – Iconic Photographer

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Thieves Steal $20,000+ in Gear from Wedding Photographer’s Car

Thieves Steal $20,000+ in Gear from Wedding Photographer's Car

Thieves Steal $20,000+ in Gear from Wedding Photographer's Car 11

A Houston-based wedding photographer has suffered a huge setback to his career after thieves broke into his car and stole over $20,000 worth of camera equipment.

Photographer Gaurav Hariyani had just finished up a wedding photo shoot last Monday when he parked at a Costco and walked into a Buffalo Wild Wings to grab some food with friends. When he went back out to his car afterward, he found that someone had shattered his car windows and stolen all of his gear.

“When I came out to my car, I saw that my car window was shattered,” Hariyani writes. “The first thing that came to mind was my camera bag which I had a gut feeling that was gone.”

The photographer says he lost some brand-new equipment that he had worked hard and saved up for to invest in.

Lost were a Sony Alpha 1 full-frame mirrorless camera worth $6,500 (bought just three months ago), a $2,500 Sigma lens, a Canon 5D Mark IV worth about $2,700, and more.

“[The Sony Alpha 1] was my dream camera,” Hariyani continues. “I bought it after working for eight years as a photographer and videographer in the wedding industry.”

“It was definitely a heartbreaking moment for me,” Hariyani tells Click2Houston. “[…] I’ve been working for several years to get this basic equipment first and then I just invested a good amount of money with new equipment and now I see there is nothing for me.”

The photographer says that while he had some insurance that protected his property, he found that his policy didn’t cover this type of theft.

If you’re a photographer, make sure your insurance policy covers car break-ins, and always try to keep equipment and photos from shoots with you (though that brings on its own set of risks).

“If you are trying to go out or going to restaurants make sure you have your belongings with you, don’t keep it in your car,” Hariyani tells Click2Houston. “[…] It can happen anywhere.”

Read also: Steps You Can Take to Help Prevent Camera Theft

There’s a silver lining to this story, though: others are now rallying around Hariyani to help the photographer get back on his feet. After receiving local news coverage and starting a GoFundMe fundraising campaign, Hariyani has already received over $4,500 in donations to buy new camera equipment.

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An In-Depth Review of the Nanlite Forza 60 LED Light

An In-Depth Review of the Nanlite Forza 60 LED Light

What makes this LED light source a popular choice? What does it have over its competitors?

LED Lighting equipment has been growing more and more popular for both filmmaking and photography. The emergence of continuous LED fixtures that are now more affordable and more portable has allowed for more creative applications. 

In this video coming to you from filmmaker and director, Ryan Audiencial, he takes an in-depth look at the popular Nanlite Forza 60. Audiencial does a thorough run through the features and functions of the Forza 60 such as its portable size, built-in lighting effects, programmable fan function, along with its compatibility with various modifiers. As a bonus, he takes the Nanlite Forza 60 side-by-side with another popular and affordable LED light, the Godox SL60W. Though quite similar in output, these two light sources vary greatly in size, weight, function, and price. 

The portability of lighting equipment allows you to be more creative in placing them and using them in combination with other lights. The power and consistency of the light’s color dictate its reliability for crucial lighting setups. On the other hand, any light source’s compatibility with different kinds of lighting modifiers determines how many practical applications it can have.

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MindShift Gear Filter Hive Mini Review

Traditional glass filters are useful tools for landscape photography, but you need to pack them carefully to avoid breaking or scratching them. Many of the filter cases I’ve tried before are heavy, bulky, and fairly expensive. Today, I’ll review the Filter Hive Mini from MindShift Gear, which aims to fix those issues.

MindShift Filter Hive Mini Filter Pouch
MindShift Gear’s Filter Hive Mini

These days – no judgment – a lot of landscape photographers don’t carry around big filter kits and prefer to replicate everything in post-production (except probably a polarizer). For my own photography, I admit that I’ve had a set of NDs and graduated filters for years but would often leave them behind and just bring a polarizer to the field instead. If that applies to you, you may not need a dedicated filter holding pouch like this.

However, as I mentioned recently, I’ve now switched most of my landscape photography kit over from digital to film. Filters matter a lot more in analog photography, especially when shooting slide film or black and white, and I’m currently carrying along a lot more filters than I used to. Plenty of digital photographers rely on extensive filter kits, too. In either case, it’s important to store your filters somewhere that’s lightweight, well-protected, and easy to access.

My previous solution was to use NiSi’s hard-shell storage case that I’ve had for years (shown below). And while this case is perfectly fine and does a good job protecting filters from being crushed, it’s heavier than I’d like and has scratched the edges of my softer resin filters over time. Also, the slots in the NiSi case are too small for a specialty “orange polarizer” filter that I’ve been using with film, since it’s thicker than a modern filter. I felt like I needed a different solution.

NiSi Case Front Bending
NiSi hard case for comparison

I didn’t directly seek out the MindShift Gear Filter Hive Mini, but it popped up as a “suggested accessory” while I was buying a separate filter. Since it looked well-made and was only $32, I decided to add it to my cart. It’s since become one of my most-used accessories.

Specifications

  • Product Type: Filter holding pouch
  • Capacity: Four internal sections
  • Max Filter Size: 100x150mm
  • External Material: Nylon with water-repellant coating and polyurethane coating
  • Internal Material: Plush nylex lining
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 18.5 x 11.5 x 4.0 centimeters / 7.3 x 4.5 x 1.6 inches
  • Weight: 97 grams / 3.4 ounces
  • Price: $32 at publication of this review

Features

One of the main features of the MindShift Filter Hive Mini is that it’s much lighter than a hard-shell filter holding case at just 97 grams / 3.4 ounces (measured). It also takes up very little space in a bag because of how flat it folds.

Filter Hive Mini Back View

Yet the pouch is still quite sturdy. The front and back “walls” of the Filter Hive Mini have a protective insert that makes the whole thing reasonably rigid – not 100% resistant to bending, but not bad. It’s solid enough that I don’t feel worried about my filters when I throw the Mini into my backpack, which is what I care about. Of course, photographers who need something fully crush-proof would be better off with a hard-shell case instead.

Upon opening the Filter Hive Mini, the first thing that stood out to me is that the internal dividers are as soft as a microfiber cloth (though not exactly the same material as one). Rather than scratching your filters, they’re more likely to clean them. And this held true in practice; none of my filters so far have gotten scratched in the Filter Hive Mini after several months of use.

MindShift Filter Hive Mini Interior

Another feature to note is that the Filter Hive Mini’s four internal sections are color-coded with blue, green, red, and orange. This makes it easy to organize your filters so long as you remember to put them back into the same color-coded section each time.

There’s a larger version of the Filter Hive Mini which is simply called the Filter Hive, but it’s too big for my needs. It has six rectangular filter sections and six circular filter sections, but as you can see below, it’s not nearly as compact as the Mini. Although the larger capacity can be nice if you’re carrying a bigger filter system, I also wish that MindShift made a “medium” size that carried 6-7 filters but still folded small like the Mini.

MindShift Filter Hive Larger Standard Version
The larger “Filter Hive” that holds six rectangular filters and six circular filters

A slightly hidden feature of the Filter Hive Mini is that there are small openings at the bottom of both sides. Your filters themselves are never exposed to the outside world (they’re held in place by a lining higher up), but this is an elegant solution to the problem of dirt and debris getting trapped in the filter holder over time. Even in sandy conditions, grit won’t collect in the pouch, because it falls out of the openings instead.

Other features of the Filter Hive Mini include the velcro flap attachment (no zippers that could scratch the filters) and a handle at the top if you want to attach the case to the outside of your bag. Lastly, the Filter Hive Mini is made of water resistant fabric, which isn’t really necessary for this type of product but I suppose is better than the alternative.

Overall, the Filter Hive Mini feels like it was designed, or at least refined, by working photographers. It’s not flashy, but it is extremely functional and gets out of your way while shooting. The build quality is excellent, and I’ve had no issues with fabric tearing or fraying so far. If the baseline specifications work for you – four 100x150mm filter holding sections and a semi-hard-shell protective lining – the Filter Hive Mini is hard to beat.

Conclusion

I enjoy it when I can review a piece of gear that isn’t hundreds or thousands of dollars but still makes our lives easier as photographers. And while not everyone these days shoots with a kit of traditional glass filters, those who do will find the MindShift Filter Hive Mini to be an excellent way to carry them. It’s a well-designed product that packs along easily and will protect your filters in everyday situations.

That said, I wouldn’t recommend it if you expect your filter kit to be subjected to big crushing forces (maybe falling off an airplane’s cargo ramp) or if you simply need to carry more than four rectangular filters. A hard-shell case has compromises of its own but does offer more extreme protection, whereas the bigger MindShift Hive has more than double the capacity of the Mini.

Hiker with camera backpack
A good filter pouch for the backpacking landscape photographer

Otherwise, the Filter Hive Mini is an excellent product. I’ve personally been using it for the past few months and consider it one of my new favorite pieces of gear. The balance of weight, capacity, and protection are spot-on for my landscape photography needs, and I’d recommend it very highly to any photographer in a similar situation.

With the current supply chain issues, the MindShift Gear Filter Hive Mini may not be available at all retailers at the time I publish this review. However, it has been cycling in and out of stock at various stores in recent months, so I’ll put a link to several different places to buy it below. At the time of publication, the Filter Hive Mini costs $32 regardless of where you get it, and you should be able to find it in stock somewhere.

Let me know below if you have any questions!

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  • Features
  • Build Quality
  • Handling
  • Size and Weight
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Photography Life Overall Rating

Photograhy Life Gold Award

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Facebook to Remove Sexualized Photoshopped Photos of Public Figures

Facebook to Remove Sexualized Photoshopped Photos of Public Figures

Facebook to Remove Sexualized Photoshopped Photos of Public Figures 12

Facebook has announced that it will remove what it calls “severe sexualizing content” that targets public figures, and specifically points to sexualized photoshopped images among other targets.

The changes come as an update to Facebook’s existing bullying and harassment policies that it says are in place to protect the people on its apps. The goal of these updates is to help protect users from mass harassment and intimidation.

Facebook already says that it removes attacks on public figures that come from a range of possible harmful sources, but now specifically will remove a range of sexualized content posted to profiles, pages, events, or groups. These include drawings, negative physical descriptions that are tagged or mentioned to a public figure’s account, and photoshopped images.

The changes to Facebook’s policies were published to its website this week and specifically call out sharing “derogatory sexualized photoshopped imagery or drawings” as a “Tier 1” violation.

“It’s important that everyone on our apps feels safe to engage and connect with their communities. We do not allow bullying and harassment on our platform, but when it does happen, we act,” Antigone Davis, Facebook’s Global Head of Safety wrote in a blog post. “We remove content that violates our policies and disable the accounts of people who repeatedly break our rules. We also regularly pressure test these policies with our safety experts, making changes as needed.”

Davis says that the company will remove coordinated efforts of mass harassment that target individuals that it says are at “heightened risk” of offline harm, which includes victims of violent tragedies or government dissidents. She says Facebook will do this even if the content on its own wouldn’t violate company policy.

Facebook to Remove Sexualized Photoshopped Photos of Public Figures 13
Facebook

“We will also remove objectionable content that is considered mass harassment towards any individual on personal surfaces, such as direct messages in inbox or comments on personal profiles or posts. We will require additional information or context to enforce this new policy.”

The adjustments specific to the idea of photoshopped imagery are tied to Facebook’s belief that public figures should not be subjected to degrading or sexualized attacks, and have been added based on feedback “from a large number of global stakeholders.”

Davis says that in addition, Facebook will remove unwanted sexualized commentary and repeated content that is sexually harassing.

“Because what is ‘unwanted’ can be subjective, we’ll rely on additional context from the individual experiencing the abuse to take action,” she explains.

Facebook has been under heightened scrutiny after a major report showed the company was aware that its platforms can cause mental harm to teens. The changes to Facebook’s policy here do not directly address those issues, but the company will likely take additional steps in the near future to help repair its damaged public image.


Image credits: Header photo licensed via Depositphotos.

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5 Tips for Lighting Headshots From Peter Hurley

5 Tips for Lighting Headshots From Peter Hurley

Few names are more synonymous with headshot photography than Peter Hurley. In this helpful video, he offers five fantastic tips on lighting for headshots that will improve your work in no time. 

Coming to you from Peter Hurley with B&H Photo and Video, this awesome video tutorial will show you five tips for improving the lighting in your headshots. As you will see, Hurley often uses a multi-light setup to keep very precise control over each aspect of the rendering of his subject and background, and while that is certainly great, one thing that I really appreciated was how Hurley showed that you can still produce professional results even with nothing but natural light. When you are first starting out, working with natural light is a great way both to build a portfolio before you invest a lot of money in expensive equipment and to learn how to handle your camera, make your subject comfortable, and more without the added complexity of artificial lights. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Hurley. 

If you would like to learn more about lighting for headshots from Peter Hurley, be sure to check out “Illuminating The Face: Lighting for Headshots and Portraits With Peter Hurley!”

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Top Photo Pros Unite to Support Charity and Improve Online Education for Photographers

Top Photo Pros Unite to Support Charity and Improve Online Education for Photographers

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Over 20 of the most highly acclaimed photographers and creative brands from around the world have joined forces to raise money for charity, and creatives like you are benefiting. Serge Ramelli, Mads Peter Iversen, Alexander Stemplewski, Karlie Place, Peter Hurley, Phlearn, KelbyOne, and Fstoppers are amongst the notable contributors to a digital bundle of tools and resources purposed to save photographers thousands of dollars while raising millions for deserving charities.

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Organized by 5DayDeal, the annual initiative has distributed over $2 million in funds to a plethora of charities since 2014, but the charities aren’t alone in benefitting from these efforts. Over 160,000 creatives (and counting) have also profited from this creative approach to collaborative philanthropy. That’s because these photography bundles, which have been marked down anywhere from 95 to 97 percent, are filled with training and tools to assist creatives in the advancement of their own abilities, careers, and artistry.

The sale of these bundles has funded such achievements as life-saving rescues of human trafficking victims, surgeries made possible by medical ships providing care to impoverished coastal regions, spirit-lifting camps for children beset with cancer, and so many more. Since the onset of COVID-19, primary efforts have been centered around providing meals and education to those who would otherwise be unable to obtain such necessities.

Funds raised from the 2020 bundle events enabled the company to pay for a food silo that helped feed more than 500,000 meals to families last year alone and will continue to provide consistent means for families for years to come and that’s just one example of the many ways the company provides charity support each year!

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Each year, 5DayDeal selects charities to raise money for and they team up with some of the world’s most renowned photographers and educators to develop exclusive bundles of educational resources and post-processing tools. They then offered them at an extreme discount for just 5 days. This year, photographers can save up to 96% and get thousands of dollars worth of tools for as little as $89.

See all 2021 Photography Bundle options here.

The selected charities benefiting from this year’s bundles include:

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Learn more about these charities here.

Photographers seeking professional and/or artistic growth mark their calendars for these sales each year to ensure they don’t miss them. The collection of materials is only offered for 5 days, and once they are gone, this unique combination of resources is never offered again. Past purchasers note the extreme value they obtained due to the high quality of resources and bargain pricing.

Purchasers of this year’s bundles can get as many as 285 educational tutorials, demonstrations, and masterclasses; over 11,000 presets, tools, actions, brushes, and overlays; and nearly 550 practice images. Additional perks include creative solutions, digital magazines and ebooks, access to a website with exclusive photography resources, and so much more.

Take a look at this incredible assortment of products included in this year’s Complete Photography Bundle!

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Don’t miss your chance to experience creative and professional growth in your craft while joining hundreds of thousands of photographers in this philanthropic effort! Get the unique set of resources found in The 2021 Photography Bundle before it disappears on October 19th at noon PST.

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5DayDeal is also giving away over $10,000 in photography gear and resources. Sign up for your chance to win. No purchase is necessary to win and no strings attached!

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Full disclosure: This article was brought to you by 5DayDeal.

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Loads of Bokeh for APS-C Photographers: The 7artisans 25mm f/0.95 Lens

Loads of Bokeh for APS-C Photographers: The 7artisans 25mm f/0.95 Lens

Chinese lens manufacturer 7artisans has just released a very fast, manual focus prime lens for a wide range of crop-sensor format cameras.

The 7artisans 25mm f/0.95 is available for Sony E, Fujifilm, Canon EOS-M, Micro Four Thirds, Nikon Z, L-mount, and Canon EOS R and is on sale for $369. You’d be forgiven for being confused, however, as the 7artisans website lists “Fuji FX” as one of the available mounts, and Canon’s R-mount cameras are all full frame (for now, at least).

25mm works out as a full frame equivalent of around 37-40mm, with crop factors varying slightly between manufacturers. 11 elements sit in 9 groups, 3 of which are HOYA ultra-low dispersion elements to control chromatic aberrations. The lens features 13 aperture blades and has a minimum focusing distance of 9.8 in (25 cm). The maximum aperture of f/0.95 will offer users a very shallow depth of field. The lens barrel is an all-metal construction and features engraved depth of field and focusing scales.

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7artisans has been making affordable fast primes for various mounts for more than five years now, creating relatively niche products and making fast apertures available thanks to simple designs and a lack of electronics.

Will you be placing an order? Let us know in the comments below.

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