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What is Panama Papers? Here is everything you need to know

What is Panama Papers? Here is everything you need to know

Panama Papers, what is panama papers, indian is panama list

Two years after the Panama Papers blew the lid off how the rich and powerful park and move their money in and out of secret tax havens, a fresh document leak from the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca reveals new offshore links of an array of global elites.

More than 11 million documents from the secret files of Mossack Fonseca, a law firm headquartered in tax haven Panama, known for its factory-like production of offshore companies for its worldwide clientele of the well-heeled revealed a list of individuals who have paid the firm — and bought the benefits of the secretive, lax regulatory system in which it operates — to set up offshore entities in tax havens around the world.

And Mossack Fonseca’s eagerness to meet their demands, each one for a fee, that helps mask real ownership but still show compliance.

Video| A Peek Into India Express’ 8 Month Long Investigation

Over 500 Indians figure on the firm’s list of offshore companies, foundations and trusts. There are also 234 Indian passports (handed over by clients as part of the incorporation process), an eight-month-long investigation of over 36,000 files by The Indian Express has revealed.

Of these, The Indian Express has checked the authenticity of over 300 addresses.

© IE Online Media Services Pvt Ltd

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Panasonic’s new vlogging camera uses facial recognition tracking to isolate the sound of your voice

Panasonic’s new vlogging camera uses facial recognition tracking to isolate the sound of your voice


The flip-around screen is essential for seeing your face as you record.

The flip-around screen is essential for seeing your face as you record. (Panasonic /)

Production value matters when you’re on-camera. That became very apparent at the start of social distancing when we started going to fewer places and spending a lot more time in front of a webcam. Quality is especially crucial for influencers, aspiring YouTubers, and vloggers of any kind. Smartphones are simple, but they don’t offer the same overall image quality or that blurry background look that’s difficult to achieve on a smartphone’s tiny sensor.

This week, Panasonic announced the G100. It costs $750 and is clearly aimed at those looking to get into the talk-into-the-camera influencer genre of content creation. One bundle even comes with a hand-grip that doubles as a mini-tripod for shooting walk-and-talk videos of yourself.

Inside, it has a 20.3-megapizel sensor typical for Panasonic cameras. It’s Micro Four Thirds in size, which means it’s smaller than the APS-C and full-frame models found in other mirrorless cameras, but it’s considerably larger than the small sensor inside of a smartphone.

When shooting in 4K, however, the camera can’t utilize the entire sensor. Instead, it shoots from a smaller cropped area in the center. This makes lenses appear more zoomed-in than they would if they were using the whole sensor. That’s inconvenient if you’re typically shooting at arm’s length because you need an even wider-than-normal lens to capture a typical field of view. This isn’t a uniquely Panasonic problem—Canon opts for cropped 4K on many of its DSLRs—but on a video-centric model like the G100, it’s curious.

The G100 has interchangeable lenses in case you want to branch out in your shooting.

The G100 has interchangeable lenses in case you want to branch out in your shooting. (Panasonic /)

Cropping in for video does offer some advantages when it comes to image stabilization. The active area on the sensor can actually move around in order to try to counteract camera shake. That’s not possible without extra real-estate around the edges of the frame. Still, the effect may not be pronounced enough to counteract the difference in view.

It also has a mini-HDMI out and headphone in ports, but it lacks a headphone-out jack, which makes it more difficult to monitor audio as you record.

On the plus side, the G100 offers a new feature called Ozo audio, which uses facial recognition-based tracking in order to identify and isolate audio coming from a person talking in the frame. It showed up in Nokia phones before making its way to cameras. You can see a demo from Nokia below.

Right now is a fairly critical time for Panasonic’s camera offerings. The company has largely been focusing on its full-frame professional series cameras. At the same time, however, one of its main rivals, Olympus, just sold off its camera division leaving its future unclear. Panasonic could try to scoop up some of the Olympus marketshare in the Micro Four Thirds segment or keep moving toward its full-frame cameras.

If the concept of a vlogging camera seems familiar, you may have seen Sony’s ZV-1, which debuted just a few weeks ago. It doesn’t have interchangeable lenses like the G100. Instead, it relies on an attached zoom lens that makes it more like a compact camera than a mirrorless model.

While you can’t switch the lens on the Sony, however, it does have a much larger relative aperture. Sony’s built-in zoom offers a roughly 24-70mm equivalent zoom with an f/1.8-f/2.8 aperture range. The included Panasonic lens has a roughly a 24-64mm zoom with a much slower f/3.5-5.6 aperture. So, the Panasonic gives you more options, but they’re going to cost you more than your initial investment.

Like the Panasonic, the Sony also confusingly excludes a built-in headphone jack for monitoring audio while you shoot.

Right now, the Canon EOS M50 is about the same price as both of these new vlogging-specific models. It comes with a pair of lenses, including a long zoom, which isn’t much use for YouTubers. But, it offers a larger APS-C sensor and Canon’s excellent Dual Pixel autofocus.

Expect to see more cameras in this area coming down the line. Hopefully, one of them will eventually get a headphone jack.

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Exclusive Interview with Judi Iranyi and Remembering…

Judi Iranyi

Michael Stone 1965-1984

Michael P. Stone, our only child, died of AIDS in November 1984, the Sunday after Thanksgiving. Michael was 19 and a senior at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

He had a short but full life. As a elementary school child he was part of Ballet Celeste, a children’s dance company. He was also a member of the San Francisco Boys Chorus and traveled with them to the Christmas Tree lighting ceremony at the White House when President Ford was in office.

He also did extensive traveling both in South America and Europe. He spent his Junior college year abroad in Lima, Peru. He spoke fluent Spanish and was also a photographer. He had a very bright future ahead.

After his death, I made a quilt as a visual reminder of Michael’s life as part of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt. This photographic series is also a visual reminder of Michael’s life.

My husband and I received a call on a Saturday morning from a physician at a Santa Cruz hospital, who said that Michael had been admitted to the hospital with a serious illness. The physician indicated that if we wanted to see our son alive, we had better rush down to Santa Cruz.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael Judi Iranyi

He was indeed diagnosed with pneumocystis, a common AIDS-related illness. We remember the medical staffs’ contagion hysteria: gowned and masked up. One of the nurses insisted that we get someone to give him last rites. We declined. Basically, the medical staff had written Michael off. And indeed, back in 1984, AIDS was a death sentence. If he had been diagnosed today, Michael would probably be still alive.

I have come to terms with our mortality, now realizing how fragile life is. Don’t wait, do and say it now. I saw Michael mature and saw his courage. Most importantly, my husband and I were there to provide love and support. I am grateful that we had a chance to talk before he died. We could have spent our whole lives having never said the things that were said to each other in those last few weeks before he died.

After Michael’s death, I went back to school and got my Master of Social Work (MSW) degree at San Francisco State University. While at school, I started an AIDS volunteer program at Kaiser Permanente Hospital here in San Francisco. Michael had our emotional support during his illness, but I realized how often many AIDS patients had little or no emotional support. And back then, the air was filled with hysteria and misinformation about the disease. The AIDS volunteer program provided emotional support and information to patients and their loved ones. After receiving my MSW degree, I became the social worker in Kaiser’s dedicated AIDS unit. I worked with AIDS patients until 2001 when I retired from Kaiser.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

From my own experience, I know that parents of a child suffering from a life-threatening illness face special problems. The death of a child is a devastating experience. It severely taxes a parent’s adaptive capacities. In our society, a child’s death is unexpected because children are supposed to outlive their parents. A child’s death can tear a marriage apart. In our case, it brought us closer together.

A child’s death is not something you get over, but you learn to live with the pain. I feel lucky to have many images from his life, they add physicality to the memories.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

We asked Judi Iranyi a few questions about her work as a photographer

All About Photo: Tell us about your first introduction to photography, what drew you into this world?
Judi Iranyi: Photography has been an integral part of my life since the birth of my son Michael in 1965. My work is influenced by my upbringing and traveling. I was born in Hungary and my parents emigrated to Venezuela. We left Venezuela after I finished high school and moved to Germany. I met my husband in Germany and our son was born there.
We then moved to the United States. My husband was then posted to Okinawa and we lived there for two years. Then it was back to the States, first on East Coast, and then to San Francisco, where we have been for the last forty-seven years. When I retired in 2013, I entered the member’s exhibition at Camerawork and my book about Bay Area families was one of the ten jury selections. This was the start of my art photography. I was lucky to meet Ann Jastrab and Sarah Christianson, who were very supportive and helped me to start exhibiting my work and continue making images.

Did you have any formal training in Photography?


I went to San Francisco City College and finished the two-year commercial photography program. I then got my BA in Art at San Francisco State University. I then went to U.C. Berkeley and got a Masters in Visual Design. There I studied with William Garnet. I became interested in Museum work and went to a Museum Studies program at John F. Kennedy University.

I tried commercial Photography but that was not a good fit for me.

I continued to take photographs, I visited Museums and Photography exhibits in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York City, and all over the world.

I was lucky that I was able to travel all over the world, in my travels I was interested in the people and the different cultures of each place.

My life got turned over when my son died of AIDS in 1984. After his death, I went back and got a Masters in Social Work and worked as a Social Worker until my retirement.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Your work is very different from one-another, how do you choose your projects?
I love to take portraits both of individual people and families, I like the interaction that happens when you photograph people. In my travels, I photograph people, culture and landscapes, especially old monuments and ancient sites.
I always have my camera with me so I also do a lot of street photography. I admit that I am not too organized and choose projects in the moment, some I finish, others I don’t.

What equipment do you use?

When I started I was using a 4×5 camera which I found very hard to lug around and it made me feel very conspicuous. I did not want to attract attention. Also I could not see traveling with a 4×5 camera. I switched to a twin-lens Mamiya, I also used various 35mm cameras. Currently, I use a digital Sony mirrorless camera. I like it because it is very compact and fits in my purse. I was never into fancy equipment; I was interested in the images, I also have used disposable cameras when my camera was not available due to malfunctioning or misplacing my Sony.

Today, I mostly use my digital camera but at times I want to use film and then I use disposable cameras.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Do you spend a lot of time editing your work?
Yes I do do, because I shoot a lot, since I am not sure that I will return to that place in the future.

You have traveled to many many counties, is there one that stands out more than others?

They all do, but I especially enjoyed Africa; the people, the landscapes and animals were so different from what I expected.

Do you have a favorite photographer?

I admire many photographers including: Sebastian Salgado, Yusuf Karsh, Imogen Cunningham, Joseph Koudelka, Henri Cartier-Bresson, W.Eugene Smith, Dorothea Lange, Andre Kertesz, Julia Margaret Cameron, Dora Mar, Sheila Metzner, Olivia Parker, Marie Cosindas, Jerry Ulsman and Brigitte Carnochan.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Do you work mostly in color?
I used to prefer black and white but now I also use color. I continue to love and use sepia tones.

What are your current and future projects?

I am working on a series of portraits of older people and friends. Scanning my negatives, organizing my digital images and learning to hand color my photographs.

What inspires you?

People, art, literature and things that are new to me.

What are your other passions?

Literature is very important to me. I read every day both fiction and nonfiction. I also enjoy music and traveling.

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Remembering Michael © Judi Iranyi

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : project renovation

johnriley1uk's latest blog : cool activities on the streets of manchester

Project Renovation

17 Aug 2020 12:19AM  
Views : 154
Unique : 118

Quite the opposite concept to my other long term project, Project Decay, is Sue’s long term project renovating the doll’s house that her Dad made some years ago. It’s been played with and partially restored many times over the last 30 years or so, but now is in need of a “final” restoration before any Great Grandchildren arrive. We’re not old enough for that yet, and the Grandchildren are too young, so there should be plenty of time. So, I decided today to make a record of the interior of the rooms whilst they are in their “derelict” state, and then keep up that record over the coming months.

First off, let’s look at some images shot with the Pentax K-3 II with the 10-17mm Fisheye zoom lens. This enables us to really get in close, include all the interior of the rooms, which are barely 15cm (6 inches) across, and also get a real sense of being in there.

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Then, in an attempt to get further into the rooms for an even closer look and, hopefully, an increased sense of being within a room rather than just looking in, I turned to the Pentax Q-S1 with its own 3.2mm Fisheye lens.
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As you can see, there’s a fair bit of work to be done, but it will happen and in a couple of months perhaps we can have another look to see how it’s progressing.

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Master Urban Abstract Photography With These 8 Tips

Master Urban Abstract Photography With These 8 Tips

Capture something you may not have normally noticed by shooting abstracts in the town or city where shapes and colour will become your focus rather than big buildings and busy streets.

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Architecture

Building

 

To help you give your urban photography an abstract feel, here are 8 top tips on what, how and where to take your photos when out exploring a town or city. 

 

1. Focus On What’s Interesting

When you find something that catches your eye, think about how you can compose the shot to take the subject away from its surroundings so it becomes abstract rather than a great city shot with several interesting elements. The key to capturing an image that works is to create an image out of something ordinary that you wouldn’t normally see while still creating an appealing shot.

 

2. More Than One Point Of Interest

When you have a subject that has multiple points of interest you have the opportunity to capture various elements, some which may not have seemed so obvious as working in an abstract way at the start.

 

3. Create Scale

Just because you’re capturing abstracts doesn’t mean you always have to work up-close. Think of it as cropping out unwanted elements rather than using your lens to zoom in. Use surrounding elements to emphasise size but still frame the image so the building’s surroundings are removed, giving emphasis to its shapes and patterns rather than it having context. 

 

4. Use Colour

By using a single bright colour in a shot that’s mostly of the same shades can give the viewer of the image a point of focus that can also be used to guide and lead the eye to other points in the shot. This is even more so when the area is limited and contrasts so greatly with the rest of the image. Strong blocks of colour can also work well but you don’t want one to overpower the other so the viewer doesn’t pay attention to the rest of the frame. 

 

Door

 

5. Look For Shadows 

This isn’t something our eyes tend to see but when arranged in the frame properly, they can be a great subject matter on their own or enhance the shapes/patterns of an object you’re making your point of focus. 

 

6. Lines Work Well

 If you want to use lines in your image, try to find a location that gives you a shot that has lines that vary in size and colour. Bolder lines can have more impact than small, faint ones and do remember they will still guide the eye through the shot and tell the viewer where they should be looking. Don’t think lines have to be straight either as a curved line will still guide the viewer’s eye. 

 

7. Shoot Through Other Objects

If you find a rain-covered window or even a water feature that can be used to capture a distorted reflection thanks to the ripples in the water, use them to your advantage. Keep an eye out for coloured glass, reflective buildings and any other items you think will give your city shots that abstract feel you’re searching for. 

 

8. People Like Patterns & Symmetry 

As humans, we like to see repeating patterns and symmetrical objects so take advantage of this. Patterns can guide the eye across an image as well as make your abstract shot more interesting thanks to the shapes they create. 

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 August 2020

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 August 2020

The week 2 winner of our popular daily challenges which take place in our forum has been chosen. Read on to find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung this time.

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Competitions

Heron

© Mstphoto

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to Mstphoto (Day 14 – ”Long Exposure) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 9

Crop Fields

 

Day 10

Tourist’

 

Day 11

Negative Space

 

Day 12

Letters

Back In Time.

 

Day 13

People

Show Judges

 

Day 15

Pattern

Cleg / Horse fly

 

Day 16

Vignettes

 

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

 

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
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Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK,
WEX

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Remembering 19th-Century Daguerreotypist Thomas Easterly ~ Photography News

Remembering 19th-Century Daguerreotypist Thomas Easterly ~ Photography News

October 3, 2018 /Photography News/ Born 209 years ago today, on October 3, 1809, Thomas Martin Easterly was one of the most prominent and well-known daguerreotypists in the Midwest United States during the 1850s, with his studio becoming one of the first permanent art galleries in Missouri.

By 1844, Easterly had begun practicing photography taking outdoor photographs
of architectural landmarks and scenic sites in Vermont. Among his
earliest daguerreotypes, made a decade before outdoor photography was
popular or profitable, those of the Winooski and Connecticut rivers are the only known examples to be self-consciously influenced by the romantic landscape paintings of the Hudson River School
artists. He was also the first and only daguerreotypist to identify his
work using engraved signatures and descriptive captions.

Ruins of the Great St. Louis Fire, 17-18 May 1849. Daguerreotype by Thomas M. Easterly, 1849. Source: Missouri History Museum Photographs and Prints Collections
Ruins of the Great St. Louis Fire, 17-18 May 1849. Daguerreotype by Thomas M. Easterly, 1849. Source: Missouri History Museum Photographs and Prints Collections
No-Che-Ninga-An, Chief of the Iowas, 1845
No-Che-Ninga-An, Chief of the Iowas, 1845
Lynch's Slave Market, 104 Locust Street, 1852, by Thomas Martin Easterly. According to the National Parks Service, "there were constant reminders of the horrors of slavery in antebellum St. Louis. One of the worst involved the open sales of slaves at various places along the city’s busiest streets, which was an accepted community practice. Regular slave auctions and sales were held in several places, most notably at the slave market run by Bernard M. Lynch on Locust Street between Fourth and Fifth. This market was moved in 1859 to Broadway and Clark Streets. Lynch’s “slave pens” were former private residences with bars placed on all the windows to secure them like prisons. Slaves were herded off steamboats and up the street to the slave houses, then sold to persons, especially after 1840, from outside St. Louis, mostly from the western counties in Missouri or further down the river. Families were broken up, with children taken from mothers, fathers sold down the river, husbands and wives separated. And all of this was done in full view of crowds wishing to buy and passersby going about their daily business." Source: Missouri History Museum.
Lynch’s Slave Market, 104 Locust Street, 1852, by Thomas Martin Easterly. According to the National Parks Service, “there were constant reminders of the horrors of slavery in
antebellum St. Louis. One of the worst involved the open sales of slaves
at various places along the city’s busiest streets, which was an
accepted community practice. Regular slave auctions and sales were held
in several places, most notably at the slave market run by Bernard M.
Lynch on Locust Street between Fourth and Fifth. This market was moved
in 1859 to Broadway and Clark Streets. Lynch’s “slave pens” were former
private residences with bars placed on all the windows to secure them
like prisons. Slaves were herded off steamboats and up the street to the
slave houses, then sold to persons, especially after 1840, from outside
St. Louis, mostly from the western counties in Missouri or further down
the river. Families were broken up, with children taken from mothers,
fathers sold down the river, husbands and wives separated. And all of
this was done in full view of crowds wishing to buy and passersby going
about their daily business.” Source:
Missouri History Museum.

In the fall of 1845, Easterly traveled to the Midwest United States and toured the Mississippi River
with Frederick F. Webb as representatives of the Daguerreotype Art
Union. The two gained some notoriety from their photography of the
criminals convicted of the murder of George Davenport
in October of that year. Iowa newspapers reported that Easterly and
Webb had achieved a “splendid likeness” of the men shortly before their
execution.

Easterly soon became popular for his portraits of prominent residents of St. Louis and visiting
celebrities which were displayed in a temporary gallery on Glasgow Row. One of these portraits was that of Chief Keokuk taken March 1847. He also took a daguerreotype of a lightning bolt, one of the first recorded “instantaneous” photographic images, while in St. Louis. This was later recorded in the Iowa Sentinel as an “Astonishing Achievement in Art”. Before returning to Vermont in August 1847, the St. Louis Reveille described his as an “unrivaled daguerreotypist”.

Easterly was brought back to Missouri by John Ostrander,
founder of the first daguerreotype gallery in St. Louis, in early 1848.
Preparing for an extended “tour of the south”, Ostringer asked Easterly
to manage his portrait gallery. Esterly would continue running the
gallery when Ostringer died a short time later. Many of his unique streetscapes
depicting mid-19th-century urban life were taken from the window’s of
Ostringer’s gallery. In June 1850, he married schoolteacher Anna Miriam
Bailey and settled in St. Louis permanently. 

Daguerreotype portrait of Enoch Long, circa 1855, Thomas Easterly. Source: Missouri Historical Society
Daguerreotype portrait of Enoch Long, circa 1855, Thomas Easterly. Source: Missouri Historical Society

By the
1860s most photographers had abandoned
the daguerreotype process for the
albumen and collodion processes.
Easterly felt that the daguerreotype was
an art form and refused to adopt new
techniques, urging the public to “save your old daguerreotypes for you will never see their like again”. His studio
suffered from declining patronage, and
he himself developed poor health,
probably due to the mercury poisoning
often associated with the daguerreotype
process.  

Despite the declining interest for pictures on silver, he was
able to maintain his gallery until it burned in a fire in 1865. He was
forced to move to a smaller location and continued working in near
obscurity until his death in St. Louis on March 12, 1882.

Daguerreotype Gallery of Thomas Martin Easterly, St. Louis, Missouri, 1851. Author: unattributed. Source: Missouri History Museum
Daguerreotype Gallery of Thomas Martin Easterly, St. Louis, Missouri, 1851. Author: unattributed. Source: Missouri History Museum

After his death, his wife sold most of his personal collection to John Scholton, another noted St. Louis photographer. The Scholton family eventually donated the plates to the Missouri Historical Society
where they remained for nearly a century before being rediscovered
during the 1980s by art scholars studying pre-American Civil War
photography.

Although his reputation was limited to the Midwest during his lifetime, Easterly is considered to have been one of the foremost experts in the field
of daguerreotype photography in the United States during the mid-to-late 19th century.

The most complete appreciation of
Easterly’s life and work, with 233
illustrations is Dolores Kilgo’s book
“Likeness and Landscape: Thomas M.
Easterly and the Art of the
Daguerreotype”
published by the Missouri
Historical Society Press in 1994. An
exhibit of the same name accompanied the
book.

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Photography News, Tips, and Techniques | Digital Camera Reviews

Photography News, Tips, and Techniques | Digital Camera Reviews

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Digital Trends helps readers keep tabs on the fast-paced world of tech with all the latest news, fun product reviews, insightful editorials, and one-of-a-kind sneak peeks.

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Birds of Caparaó

I edited this video during the pandemic. Although I was not fully trapped in the area where I live during lockdowns, I still suffered from depression and discouragement, which significantly delayed my editing process. In the video below, I explain what boosted my encouragement to work on it.

As for the gear, I used the Nikon D500 to capture all footage. The lenses used were Nikon 20mm f/1.8G, 50mm f/1.8G and 200-500mm f/5.6E VR. Filming the birds with a DLSR was quite difficult and required patience, as the time required to raise the mirror for live view mode made me miss many scenes. Sound capture was also very important, so I used a Rode shotgun microphone and the Tascan DR5.

I hope you enjoy the video! As always, I am open for your feedback, comments, questions and criticism.

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