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New gear: TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 and 23mm f/1.4

The new TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 for Leica

Shenzhen-based lensmaker TTArtisan has taken the social media wraps off two new lenses that bring its lineup to a total of eight full-frame and six sub-frame optics. The new additions include a lightweight, compact 28mm f/5.6 prime for Leica M-mount and a bright 23mm f/1.4 prime that will be offered in several APS-C mirrorless mounts.

Meet the TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 prime lens

The new TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 for Leica
TTArtisan’s latest M-mount offering has a lot in common with Leica’s own 28mm f/5.6 lens. TTArtisan

The M 28mm f/5.6 is an alternative to Leica’s own Summaron-M 28mm f/5.6 prime, which is the brand’s smallest M-mount lens. It retails for around $3,000.

Like the Summaron (whose design dates back to the mid-1950s), the TTArtisan lens is entirely manual in operation. It’s also roughly the same size and weight and shares similar retro stylings.Also like its Leica rival, it should function well as a discreet, wide-angle walkaround optic, perfect for street photography.

It slots into TTArtisan’s M-mount lineup between the TTArtisan 21mm f/1.5 and the 35mm f/1.4 in terms of focal length but is the first with a maximum aperture smaller than F2.8.

M 28mm f/5.6: Optical design

The TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 has a slightly more complex optical formula than its aged Leica forebear, with a total of seven elements in four groups. Among these, there are two high refractive index elements and one low dispersion element; both should help tame aberrations. By way of comparison, the Leica has six elements in four groups and makes no use of modern glass formulations.

M 28mm f/5.6: Aperture

The new TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 for Leica
This compact 28mm f/5.6 lens should be perfect for daytime street photography. TTArtisan

This modern TTArtisan lens uses a six-bladed aperture diaphragm, yielding an aperture range of f/5.6-f/22. By contrast, its much older Leica rival has an eight-bladed aperture. While more blades tend to result in rounder/prettier bokeh, you’ll likely be hard-pressed to notice the difference in real-world shooting. The f/5.6 maximum aperture limits shallow depth of field opportunities. That said, the Leica version may offer more pleasing sunstars when stopped down.

M 28mm f/5.6: Focus

As a fully manual lens, you’ll need to focus it yourself. But again, the generous depth of field offered by the f/5.6 maximum aperture negates the need for precise focus in the first place. The minimum subject distance is 3.3 feet (1.0m). And a focus depth scale on the lens barrel should help users set focus on the fly.

M 28mm f/5.6: Build quality

The new TTartisan M 28mm f/5.6
It may not be a Leica lens, but it sure looks good attached to a Leica body. TTArtisan

It might not be from Leica but the TTArtisan 28mm appears to offer a solid build quality nonetheless. The body is made from chrome-plated brass and it sports a focus lever similar in design to the original Leica. The lever has an automatic lock at infinity focus that’s released by pressing on it.

Dimensions of both lenses are nearly identical, with a barrel size of 2.0 inches by 0.75 inches (51 x 19mm) for the TTArtisan while the Leica comes in at just a few hundredths of an inch (1mm) shorter with its lens cap removed. The TTArtisan is a good half-ounce (14g) lighter, though, tipping the scales at 5.3 ounces (151g).

Up front, the TTArtisan lens accepts 37mm threaded filters versus the 34mm filters used by the Leica. TTArtisan also includes a removable lens hood in the product bundle.

TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6: Pricing & availability

Pricing or availability for the TTArtisan M 28mm f/5.6 has yet to be announced. Based on the sub-$800 pricing for all of its other M-mount lenses, though, it’s likely to prove vastly more affordable than the Leica Summaron-M 28mm f/5.6.

Meet the TTArtisan APS-C 23mm f/1.4 prime lens, too

The new TTArtisan APS-C 23mm f1.4
The 23mm f/1.4 will be available in a range of APS-C mounts. TTArtisan

The other new lens unveiled by TTArtisan slots in between the existing TTArtisan APS-C 17mm f/1.4 and 35mm f/1.4 lenses. The 23mm focal length is equivalent to 35mm after accounting for the APS-C crop factor. And like the lenses that sit beside it, the 23mm also has an f/1.4-f/16 aperture range. Barrel dimensions are 2.4 inches by 1.6 inches (60 x 40.5mm).

We can’t yet say for certain which mounts it will be offered in. Though the company’s press materials do show the lens used with Canon EF-M, Fujifilm X, Micro Four Thirds, and Sony E-mount bodies. TTArtisan does also make lenses in Canon RF, Leica L, and Nikon Z mount. And it will be interesting to see if they offer a version of the 23mm f/1.4 in any of those.

TTArtisan APS-C 23mm f/1.4: Pricing & availability

Further details, including pricing and availability, have yet to be revealed. However, given that the company’s other APS-C primes retail in the range of $73-$149 before shipping, we can likely expect this lens to be extremely affordable indeed.

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Nikon Z 28mm f/2.8: affordable full-frame wide angle

Nikon Z 28mm f/2.8: affordable full-frame wide angle

November 18, 2021

Nikon has announced a lightweight wideangle prime for its Z system full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8. The lens can also be used on the APS-C sensor Nikon Z 50 and Nikon Z fc cameras, on which it will offer a 42mm equivalent angle of view. Indeed it was initially offered as a cosmetically reworked ‘SE’ version in a kit with the Z fc. It joins the recently announced Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 in this new strand of the firm’s lens line-up.

Nikon Z 28mm f/2.8: affordable full-frame wide angle 1

Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 on the Nikon Z 5

This compact, lightweight optic is said to be the smallest yet in the Z-mount arsenal, at 43mm in length and just 155g. It has a minimum focus distance of a mere 19cm, and accepts 52mm filters. A 7-bladed diaphragm is on board promising ‘soft, natural bokeh’.

As with other Nikon Z lenses, the manual focus ring can do double duty as a control dial for changing exposure settings such as aperture, ISO or exposure compensation. Impressively for such an affordable optic, Nikon has sealed it to provide protection against dust and water. The firm also says that the lens is ideal for video thanks to the use of a quiet stepping motor for autofocus, and reduced focus breathing.

Nikon Z 28mm f/2.8: affordable full-frame wide angle 2

The Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 measures just 43mm in length

The Nikon Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 will cost £249 and is expected to appear in the shops sometime in December.

Nikon Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 full specifications:

  • Price  £249
  • Filter Diameter  52mm
  • Lens Elements  9 (2 aspherical)
  • Groups  8
  • Diaphragm blades  7
  • Aperture  f/2.8 – f/16
  • Minimum focus  19cm
  • Length  43mm
  • Diameter  70mm
  • Weight  155g
  • Lens Mount  Nikon Z
  • Included accessories  Front and rear caps

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Nikon Unveils the Light and Compact 28mm f/2.8 Z-Mount Lens

Side profile of the nikon 28mm f/2.8 lens

Side profile of the nikon 28mm f/2.8 lens

Nikon has announced the new Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 lens for its Z-mount. Designed for both crop-sensor APS-C and full-frame mirrorless cameras, the lens promises to be fast as well as small and compact.

The 28mm f/2.8 is designed to be small and compact. It has a total length of about 1.7-inches and weighs 5.46 ounces (155 grams) which makes it the smallest and lightest among the Nikkor Z prime lenses. Nikon says that it believes the lens to be ideal for detailed photos and videos of food, DIY crafts, and fashion as well as everyday snapshots, group portraits, landscapes, and cityscapes. Basically, the lens is small, wide, and fast, which also makes it nimble and versatile for a variety of use cases.

The Nikon 28mm f/2.8 attached to a Nikon Z5, top view

Nikon 28mm f/2.8 lens top view

The lens is constructed of nine elements in eight groups, two of which are aspherical elements. It features a maximum reproduction ratio of 0.2x, a close minimum focus distance of 0.63 feet (0.19 meters) and has a maximum angle of view of 53-degrees on DX-format cameras and 75-degrees on FX-format cameras. It has an aperture range of f/2.8 through f/16 through a seven-bladed diaphragm. The lens accepts screw-on filters via its 52mm front element, features internal focusing, and supports both auto and manual focus.

The Nikon 28mm f/2.8 lens attached to a camera and held by two hands

On autofocus, Nikon says that the 28mm f/2.8 lens uses a “multi-focusing system” that realizes natural rendering across the entire shooting range as well as allows for fast and accurate autofocus control. Nikon does not specifically note what kind of autofocus motor the lens uses, however. Nikon adds that the lens was made with video recording consideration in mind, and as such promises that it has extremely quiet operation, stable exposure, and effective focus breathing compensation.

A Nikon camera and lens held up to a woman's eye

The lens is dust and “drip” resistant and functions such as aperture and exposure compensation can be assigned to the control ring. Finally, Nikon notes that the lens differs cosmetically from the previously announced NIKKOR Z 28mm f/2.8 SE lens in that it features a “modern” black finish.

Graphic showing the weather sealing points on the 28mm lens

Below are a few sample images taken with the lens, provided by Nikon:

Environmental portrait of a woman at a rocky beach

Portrait of a woman with a large sea shell held to her ear

Top down photo of a bouquet of yellow flowers

A hand holding up a coral colored scallop shell against a blue sky background

A portrait of a person laughing with the sun behind their hair

A portrait of a woman against a reflective background

The Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 lens is scheduled to be available in December for $300, however global supply chain issues likely mean that widespread availability can vary.

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New Voigtlander 28mm F/2.8 Aspherical SL IIs Color-Skopar Lens

New Voigtlander 28mm F/2.8 Aspherical SL IIs Color-Skopar Lens

The Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 Aspherical SL IIs Color-Skopar is a wide-angle lens designed specifically for full-frame Nikon F mount cameras.

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Interchangeable Lenses

Voigtlander 28mm F2.8 Aspherical SL IIs COLOR-SKOPAR

 

The Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 Aspherical SL IIs Color-Skopar is the latest lens to be added to the SLIIs series of manual focus lenses, for 35mm single-lens reflex cameras, and this one is designed specifically for full-frame Nikon F mount cameras.

The lens barrel is made using extremely durable metal parts with focus rings that are very smooth to operate and indents for aperture and focus knurling give the feel of a classic lens. 

Voigtlander says that the lens provides edge-to-edge sharpness and unmatched clarity for an accurate rendition of your subject matter. Colour and clarity are also said to be ‘extraordinary’ and it focuses close, too, with virtually no vignetting. 

The lens mount is interchangeable with Nikon Ai-S with built-in CPU. In addition to the built-in CPU, the lens also has an Ai coupler, so that it can be used on a wide range of camera bodies from the old film cameras of yesteryear through to the latest digital single-lens reflex cameras.                         

Paying homage to lenses from the sixties and seventies, the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 Aspherical SL IIs Color-Skopar is available with a white or black rim and is priced at £499.

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Nikkor Z 28mm F/2.8 SE Lens Review

Nikkor Z 28mm F/2.8 SE Lens Review

Nikkor Z 28mm F2/8 SE
 

Nikon have form when it comes to retro styling, first with the Df F mount body, and now with the Z fc and a small number of retro-styled lenses. We have looked at the 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 and now examine in detail the new Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 SE, a Special Edition lens that currently is only available as part of the Z fc SE kit in the UK. It is available separately in the USA. The new lens totally mimics the appearance of classic Nikon F SLR manual focus lenses, although it is in fact an AF lens. Not only does it appeal on a retro level, but its hidden secret is that it is in fact a full-frame optic. So let’s look at the new lens, using not only the APS-C 20.9 MP Nikon Z fc body but also the 45.7 MP Nikon Z 7 II.

Nikon Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 SE Handling and Features

Nikkor Z 28mm F2/8 SE
 

For the styling of the lens, it was back to the original blueprints for Nikon and the illusion is complete. The knurling of the manual focus ring, the silver ring behind that and the general shape are all genuinely Nikon F in appearance. Of course, we lose an aperture ring or meter coupler, but otherwise, traditionalists just might relate with enthusiasm to the overall ethos of the design.

Weighing in at just 160g, clearly, this is a lens using plastics extensively, including the mount. However, plastic can be a totally effective choice. There is no provided lens hood, always a shame, but there is a standard 52mm filter thread; the traditional Nikon size. The lens is dust and drip-resistant, a welcome decision.

The control ring can be set to control focus, aperture, exposure compensation or ISO. The feel of the ring seems very similar to what would be expected from any of the old F lenses, silky smooth. There are no other controls on the lens, everything else being controlled from the camera. There is therefore no AF/MF switch. There is also no option for VR (Vibration Compensation) and that function is blanked out in the camera menus. However, in-camera VR such as with the Nikon Z7 II works just fine.

Nikkor Z 28mm F2/8 SE

AF is driven by two stepping motors and is very fast, very quiet and very reliable. The focusing ring can be used to tweak the focus position after AF. Focusing is down to 0.19m, or 0.63 feet, for a maximum magnification of 0.2x, 1:5. This is close, but no closer than many traditional 28mm lenses.

Lens construction is 9 elements in 8 groups, including 2 Aspherical. IF (Internal Focusing) means the dimensions of the lens do not change. The diaphragm comprises 7 rounded blades.

The lens is only sold as part of the Z fc SE kit in the UK, although available separately in the USA. Of particular interest is that although it is supplied as part of a kit with an APS-C format camera body, it is in fact a full-frame lens. It works just as well with the Z 7 II body and the opportunity was taken to test it out on both DX and FX formats. The FX-format results in the native 28mm focal length as intended, a very useful wide-angle; the DX-format results in a “35mm-format equivalent” of 42mm. In terms of field of view, that 42mm is very close to the theoretical “standard lens” which for full-frame would be 43mm.

Either as a wide-angle, or as a slightly wide standard, depending as detailed above on the format, this is a totally lovely lens to use. It looks great, it works faultlessly and the results will speak for themselves. What’s not to like?

 

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Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 3

Cosina has announced the Voigtlander Color-Skopar 28mm f/2.8 SL II S Aspherical lens for Nikon F-mount. This all-metal manual lens is an homage to Nikon’s film lenses from the 1960s.

The Voigtlander Color-Skopar 28mm f/2.8 SL II S is described by Cosina as a wide-angle lens with sharp image quality from edge to edge. The focusing unit is equipped with a helicoid ring with a long extension which allows it to achieve a minimum focusing distance of 0.15 meters (about 5.9 inches). The lens features seven elements in six groups and uses one double-sided aspherical element.

As mentioned, the Voigtlander Color-Skopar 28mm f/2.8 features an all-metal body, focus ring, and aperture ring and includes a large carved finger grip in what Cosina describes as a “knurled” pattern made with precision cutting. this was done not only for the aforementioned nostalgia factor but also for the feeling it provides during manual operation.

As mentioned, the focusing mechanism is entirely manual. Cosina says that by adopting an all-metal helicoid unit that has been processed and adjusted with high precision and high-quality grease, the lens produces what it calls “appropriate torque.” In short, focusing feels smooth yet firm and allows for precise adjustments.

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 4

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 5

Cosina says the lens is designed with nostalgia and functionality in mind, and the multicolored aperture stops and focus markers are akin to the film lenses designed by Nikon from the 1960s and 1970s. Cosina says that one aesthetic option is a tribute to the SLR interchangeable lenses that were produced by Nikon from 1965 through 1974 that feature a silver rim. Nicknamed “Sakishiro” and “Sakijiro” (“jiro” means black and “shiro” means white in Japanese), both are options for the color of the rim.

Cosina says that it works with a variety of Nikon bodies. It is compatible with Nikon Ai-S with a built-in CPU and also has an Ai coupler. The company says that this makes it possible to use with a variety of cameras from the old-fashioned film SLRs to the latest DSLRs.

Below are a few sample photos taken with the lens and provided by Cosina:

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 6

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 7

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 8

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 9

Cosina Launches the Voigtlander 28mm f/2.8 SL II S for Nikon F-Mount 10

The Cosina Voigtlander Color-Skopar 28mm f/2.8 SL II S Aspherical lens is scheduled to be released in October in Japan for 65,000 yen (about $595) for either the black or silver-rimmed version. The optional lens hood will be sold separately for 5,000 yen (about $45). The company did not specify pricing or a release date for North America.

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Nikon Z fc Stock Remains Low, but 28mm f/2.8 Kit to Come in October

Nikon Z fc Stock Remains Low, but 28mm f/2.8 Kit to Come in October

Nikon Z fc Stock Remains Low, but 28mm f/2.8 Kit to Come in October 11

Nikon has issued a third apology over the low stock of the Nikon Z fc camera, but does end on a positive note as it also has said that the previously delayed special edition 28mm f/2.8 kit will become available in October.

The retro-inspired Nikon Z fc was announced in late June to considerable positive feedback from fans. Unfortuantely, the ongoing parts shortage that is affecting all consumer electronics companies has hit Nikon particularly hard. The company — which had already been struggling to meet 2020 orders for the Z7 II camera — was overwhelmed by demand for the Z fc.

Less than a week after the Z fc was officially announced, the company issued an apology that stated it would likely be “some time” before those who pre-ordered the camera would receive it, and even longer for those who did not to see the camera on store shelves.

Two weeks later, Nikon issued another apology, this time with regard to the Z fc 28mm f / 2.8 Special Edition Kit. The company stated that it was initially planning to make this kit available in late July, but due to overwhelming demand was forced to postpone the release indefinitely.

Now, nearly two months later, Nikon still says that the number of Z fc units it is able to produce is low, but it can say that it plans to finally release the Special Edition kit next month. Below is the full company statement, translated as spotted by Nikon Rumors.

Thank you for your continued patronage of Nikon products.

The release date of the APS-C size (Nikon DX format) mirrorless camera “Z fc 28mm f / 2.8 Special Edition Kit”, which was announced as undecided, has been decided on October 1st (Friday). We sincerely apologize for the delay in the release.

Since the “Z fc 28mm f / 2.8 Special Edition Kit” has received a large number of reservations, it may not be possible to deliver it to some customers who have already made reservations on the day of release. In addition, it may take some time for the products to be delivered to customers who make reservations in the future, as they will be delivered in sequence.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused to customers who are waiting for this product.

We will do our utmost to deliver the product as soon as possible, and we appreciate your understanding.

In short, Nikon is planning to finally release the kit, but its numbers will be limited and even those who pre-ordered it the day it was announced are not guaranteed to receive it in October.

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Hands-on With the Nikon Z fc and NIKKOR Z 28mm f/2.8 SE

Hands-on With the Nikon Z fc and NIKKOR Z 28mm f/2.8 SE

There is considerable buzz around Nikon’s latest camera and it’s easy to see why. Here is a hands-on look at it, paired with the wide-angle prime you can buy with the body as part of a package.

I’ve got to say, this camera is really appealing to me. While I haven’t ever owned a Nikon (digital) camera, I have used several. I’ve never been particularly entrenched in the view that the brands I own are the best, however, and I enjoyed using a Nikon. I did feel one negative towards it and most of their line-up, and forgive me for this Nikon fans: they’re boring. I don’t know if it’s the styling, the branding, the good but not particularly innovative spec sheets, but I just have never felt much magnetism there.

Well, consider that changed. The Nikon Z fc mirrorless body is firstly, gorgeous. Vintage styling is forever appealing to me and I know I’m not alone, but they’ve taken it one further with the Z fc. There are so many dials for so many settings that the nod to their film cameras is much more than an aesthetic decision. I love this move and the camera is just perfectly situated as a back-up body or walkaround camera. It’s under $1,200 for the body and 28mm lens, it has a good crop sensor, its form factor is shockingly small, and it can shoot UHD 4K video. Sign me up.

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Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 12

Cosina-Voigtlander has announced what it is touting as the brightest lens for interchangeable lens photography on the market: the Super Nokton 29mm f/0.8 Aspherical designed specifically for micro four-thirds.

The lens’ 29mm focal length is equivalent to a 58mm lens in the 35mm format, and the company promises it offers incredible out of focus areas thanks to the wide-open f/0.8 aperture.

Voigtlander’s latest comes in just a hair faster than the previous fastest operating lens, the Handevision/Kipon Ibelux 40mm f/0.85 Mark II. The fastest lens ever made is the Carl Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33, but that lens was created as a publicity project for the company and wasn’t ever completed as a commercially available, working lens. One could argue that there are a few other unusual lenses that have been made faster, but they lack widespread availability or are simply test cases. You can read more about those here.

As far as what will be a widely-available, fully functioning lens, Voigtlander currently is the fastest out there.

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 15

Obviously, Voigtlander touts the wide-open f/0.8 aperture as the lens’ biggest selling point, promising shallow focus and beautiful bokeh when the aperture is open and the ability to capture photos in incredibly low light.

Cosina, Voitlander’s parent company, says that the lens uses a unique grinding aspherical surface for the optical system, which the company claims makes it possible to design the lens with glass that has a higher melting point than typical molded aspherical elements. Because of this, Cosina says that they were able to achieve high image quality even at the widest aperture and also were able to keep the lens small and compact.

As it is a manual-focus lens, there are scant few notable features other than an aperture de-click switch, a nice feature which should make this lens enticing to video shooters and photographers alike – especially considering micro four-thirds tends to be very popular for video production.

Below are images taken with the new lens shared by Voigtlander. All were captured at f/0.8:

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 18

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 21

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 24

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 27

Voigtlander Unveils Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8: The Fastest Working Lens 30

The Super Nokton 28mm f/0.8 Aspherical will be available for pre-order some time in December for $2,100.

(via 43 Rumors)

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : going wide with a 28mm lens

johnriley1uk's latest blog : cool activities on the streets of manchester

Going Wide with a 28mm Lens

26 Oct 2020 10:25AM  
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Unique : 110

Once upon a time I could afford a cheap 35mm lens, but that wasn’t very wide nor did I find it very exciting. Then I discovered the cheap 28mm lenses, better but with quite poor quality sometimes. Eventually the Vivitar 28mm f/2.5 offered something a little better.

Today I’m looking at the images I shot with the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.4, using the Nikon D810 body. Here we have a very different beast, in quality, speed and price. 28mm really doesn’t feel all that wide these days, but it does still need some care with composition to get the best out of it. I’m going to delve now into the images I shot for the EPZ review and see how I now feel about them, processed anew.

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If I have a lens for review and I’m going away, then I just take it with me and use it as my kit for the day somewhere. As I would be spending the day shooting images for pleasure anyway, it makes no difference to continue with the review process. My conclusion is that, great lens as it may be, 28mm is not quite wide enough for my personal taste, but almost acceptable as a general purpose lens. No doubt Ricoh would agree, as their fixed focal length GR cameras use a 28mm-equivalent lens.

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