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6 Top Tips On Architectural Photography At Night

6 Top Tips On Architectural Photography At Night

Buildings at night

 

When buildings are illuminated at night their shapes and features are enhanced in a very different way than by daylight and it’s a great time to take photographs. The most challenging thing is getting the exposure and colour balance right, which we’ll help with, otherwise, the standard rules of composition apply which we’ll cover briefly first.

 

1. Composition – Don’t Forget The Basics 

When shooting upwards expect the building to slope inwards at the top, especially when a wide-angle lens is used. Move to a higher position to reduce the distortion or use a special shift lens that’s designed to correct perspective but these are expensive and aren’t really a sensible option for the casual shooter.

Try to include the whole building by using a wider angle lens or stepping back to a more suitable viewpoint. Choose the position carefully. The same building could be shot head-on, at an angle of, say, 3/4 or by using a telephoto to capture a section with a more graphical feel. Don’t forget you can zoom with your feet as well as your lens, too. When it comes to focusing, manual is your best option. 

 

2. Exposures

When the sun goes down the light changes in two ways; firstly the exposure time required increases and secondly the colour of the light becomes warmer. Let’s first look at the exposure. In low light, the shutter speed that’s necessary to ensure a good exposure will usually be too long to avoid camera shake when hand-holding the camera. Using a tripod enables you to shoot at these long exposure times of between 1/15sec and several seconds or even minutes. If you don’t have a tripod you can usually find a wall, lamppost or tree to support the camera, which can help considerably. Or you can try switching to a higher ISO as most cameras now cope well in the higher ranges. This means that in low light situations, such as shooting buildings at night, you can take photos with minimal noise or blurring. You’ll also want to put your camera’s self-timer into action or use a remote release if you have one as even pressing the shutter button can introduce shake that’ll leave your with blurry shots. Consider using the Mirror Lock-up function, too which can be accessed via your camera’s menu. 
 

3. Metering

Low light can also fool the camera’s meter and this happens because it looks at the mass of dark and tries to compensate to make it mid-grey. By doing so, you get an exposure time that is too long for all the illuminated parts of the scene, such as neon lights, street lights or spotlit areas of a building as they become grossly overexposed.

To avoid this, you need to compensate for it. As a guide, use your exposure compensation setting to reduce the exposure by a couple of stops when most of the area is in darkness and by one stop when the building has a medium coverage of illumination.

 

4. Colour Balance

Illuminated buildings offset against a dark sky can look great, but you have to be careful with the colour as there can be a slightly orange or yellow cast created. Buildings illuminated by artificial light can also be problematic, depending on the lighting used in them. Two popular types are Fluorescent and Tungsten. Fluorescent tend to be used inside in offices and Tungsten in spotlights that part illuminates buildings.

With digital cameras, you can preview the image to check the colour balance and if it doesn’t look right, just change the white balance setting you’re using. Cloudy will warm your shots up while the Tungsten options will give your images a more blue tone. 

 

5. Security

Take care when carrying a camera around at night, especially if you’re venturing off the beaten track. Keep alert and where possible, take a friend with you.

 

6. What To Capture 

Look for tall buildings you can shoot from. From up high you’ll be able to shoot skylines as well as focus on single buildings. For something different, try to shoot the same location in daylight and in the evening. You’ll soon see how buildings have a very different feel at night. Cropping in on illuminated buildings can make the image more striking and reduce the black from the surrounding, unlit areas. To give streetlights a ‘starburst’ use a small aperture which will also give you front-to-back sharpness in your shots too. Exposure times will be longer but if you have your tripod, this won’t be an issue. If people are still exploring the city you can use them to add more interest to your shots. Get creative with silhouettes against well-lit structures or how about using slightly longer shutter speeds, say 1/2 a second, to blur the movement of people who pass through your shot. Don’t increase your exposure times too much if you want to keep the patterns people create passing through your images though as anything above 15 seconds will probably remove them from your image. Bridges can be used to draw the eye through the image to a particular structure or focus your attention on famous buildings and landmarks which are guaranteed to be lit-up at night.

 

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6 Top Tips On Taking Photos From Heights

6 Top Tips On Taking Photos From Heights

It doesn’t matter if you climb a mountain or simply stand on a ladder, gaining height will help create a different perspective for your photos.

| 
Architecture

Cyprus

 

The beauty with photography is you’re not restricted with how you can take a photograph. You can play with as many lights as you can afford, add filters, gels and play with numerous other gadgets to alter the look of your photograph. But even though there are all these toys waiting to be played with, one of the simplest ways to change the way your image looks is to get up high.
 

1. Gear Choices

A telephoto lens is useful for pulling distant scenes to you while a wide lens is great when you’re trying to get a whole town/city in the shot. A tripod’s also handy if you’re using longer lenses but not always a necessity and they won’t be allowed in some locations. If shooting at night, a camera with good low-light capabilities will come in handy. 

 

2. Locations

Don’t look for your nearest skyscraper, get in a lift, ride to the top floor and start snapping shots of the city. You’ll cause more trouble than it’s worth, and there are plenty of other places that don’t have huge panes of glass between you and the view.

If you’re away you probably have a balcony you can get a few shots from or if your hotel has a roof terrace head up there with your kit and set up somewhere out of the way. Just ask if it’s OK to do this first otherwise you could raise a few eyebrows. Look out for observation decks, bridges and even the big wheels that are popping up in cities. These usually take an hour to complete a full circle giving you ample time to get a few cracking shots.

 

3. New Look

Shooting straight down on a building that’s been photographed hundreds and hundreds of time will instantly make your shot stand out and it will give you the opportunity to include the nearby streets to highlight the shapes and patterns not usually seen. You’ll also be able to see how shadows are elongated and help add texture to your image. If you’re not far enough away from the town/city all the buildings could appear to be all on the same level so you’ll have nothing that distinguishes between foreground or background interest. To combat this problem look for something you can have in your foreground to help break up the shot.

 

Cyprus
 

4. Not So High

If heights aren’t your thing why not try climbing a few steps or even standing on a wall to escape the standard view we usually see in shots. Looking over the bannister of a spiral staircase, for example, works well but it is something that’s overdone and a little clichéd so be warned. Try taking a walk up a hill in the countryside near a city and you’ll be able to shoot down to capture a cityscape.
 

5. Close-Up Work

Look out for buildings which stand out and use your telephoto lens to home in on them. These could be well-known landmarks, churches or even football stadiums.
 

6. Keep Your Feet On The Ground

If you want a series bird’s eye view why not try a spot of kite photography? Some have even tried throwing their camera up in the air to put a unique twist on photography from a height. Although, this isn’t something we’d recommend doing! 

   

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6 Top Tips On How To Photograph Stairs & Steps Creatively

6 Top Tips On How To Photograph Stairs & Steps Creatively

Stairs and steps can make really interesting, often graphical, photos so next time you’re waiting to climb a staircase, why not have a think about how you could photograph it?

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Architecture

Stairs

 

Stairs and steps may sound boring, however, when you start thinking about the materials they’re made from and the shapes and styles that exist, you’ll soon realise there’s plenty of steps to keep you and your camera occupied. Be it a graphical shot of an industrial set of steps leading up the side of a metal structure or a spiral staircase in a grand house, if you keep your eyes open, you’ll soon realise there are many interesting sets of steps and stairs around you that will make an interesting image. Here are a few tips to get you thinking about how you can capture shots of these subjects next time you’re out exploring with your camera. 

 

1. Gear Suggestions

A wide-angle lens will exaggerate the twists and turns of a spiral staircase while a telephoto lens is good for bringing staircases on the outside of buildings to you. Pack a polariser for stairs against glass or reflective surfaces and a tripod would be handy to help you make sure that the stairs are perfectly straight.

 

2. Guide The Eye

As stairs take you somewhere they’re naturally a great way to lead you into and through an image. They can be used to guide the eye to a particular feature or you could hide the last part of the staircase to leave the viewer wondering where the stairs may go to. Lines are a great way to lead the eye into the image and you don’t get a better line than a long bannister so use them to your advantage.

 

3. Spirals

Stand at the top or bottom of a spiral staircase with your wide-angle lens and you can get a great but rather overdone shot of the spiral shape twisting up. Try getting someone to stand or lay at the bottom or carefully peek over the bannister at the top and use the spiralling stairs as a frame.

 

Double staircase

 

 

4. Movement And Size

For your more normal staircases use your wide-angle lens to exaggerate the grandeur of a particularly wide, long set of stairs or use a slow shutter speed if you’re in a city and blur the movement of city-goers as they pass through your shot. Zoom in and fill the frame with repeating patterns of stairs to exaggerate their size which will also give your image a more graphical feel. 

 

5. Reflections

Some staircases go up the outside of buildings so use your telephoto lens to bring them to you. This lens is also great if your stairs are reflected to give you symmetry in your shot. Try to stand so you’re in the centre of the stairs and reflection to enhance the pattern.

 

6. Be Different

For something different try to shoot through the spindles to the other side of the staircase or if you’re outdoors, use them to frame a single building or a shot of showing part of the city. Try altering your angle, shooting lower down to emphasise the height and/or the number of steps in front of you. Many cameras now have vari-angle LCD screens which allow you to frame your subjects from multiple angles with ease. Which means you won’t have to get down on your knees or crouch when capturing low-angled shots. Use light and shadows to add depth, shapes and another level of interest to your shots and experiment with colour, too as turning an image black & white can really make the viewer focus on the shapes and textures of an image when the colour’s stripped away. 

 

Stairs

   

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Create Great Bokeh By Following These 6 Simple Tips

Create Great Bokeh By Following These 6 Simple Tips

Want a bit of Bokeh in your images? Take a look at this article for a few simple but effective tips for the next time you’re photographing portraits.

| 
General Photography

Portrait

 

Bokeh is the term used to describe how good the out of focus blur, which is usually in the background, looks. Good bokeh will show attractive out of focus highlights and how the lens you’re using is designed and the shape of its aperture play an important role in creating bokeh that works. Different apertures and how far you are from your subject also affect how good the bokeh will look in your shot.

 

1. Lens Choices

The shape of your lens aperture will change depending on how many blades are used and what shape they are. These blades are what open and close to let more/less light through onto the sensor. The more blades there are, the rounder the opening will be which can mean the shape of the out-of-focus highlights in the background of your shot (the bokeh) will be more circular. Generally, the more expensive lenses have more blades and as a result, they generally create bokeh that’s more pleasing. Longer lenses tend to produce better results too, however, some lenses will produce better bokeh in some situations than others so try putting your lens to the test, shooting close up portraits against a background that has highlights that can be thrown out of focus.
 

2 Depth Of Field

You may think that using the maximum aperture will give you the best results but sometimes it’s worth using a slightly smaller aperture so you can still make out some of the shapes in the background of the shot. Make sure you focus on your subject at the front of the frame too so everything behind can fall nicely out of focus. Putting a little distance between your subject and the background will also help enhance the effect. If you don’t have a subject in the foreground and are going for a more abstract shot you’ll need to focus manually.

 

Portrait
 

3. Play With Shapes

You don’t just have to settle for circular out of focus highlights as you can use black card and a pair of scissors to change the shapes that appear. You need to decide on a shape cut it out of the card then fast the card around your lens like you would a lens hood. Try to not make your shapes too small or complicated as they won’t stand out very well in your final shot.
 

4. Get Out At Night

During the evening, the glow coming from various colourful lights in towns and cities make perfect backgrounds for this technique. Just remember to use a longer lens with a wide aperture, focus on your subject and everything in the background of your shot should glow. Keep an eye on your shutter speeds when working in low light as if you drop too low it can cause the lights in the background to blur rather than glow so you may need to increase your ISO.

 

Portrait

 

5. Other Suggestions

Try shooting close-up portraits against a background of foliage where the speckles of light can be turned into out of focus highlights. Sun glinting off water and glass can also be turned into blurry circles of light too. You can also use fairy lights indoors to create out of focus coloured circles.
 

6. So Remember:

  • Use a longer focal length
  • Switch to a wider aperture
  • Focus on your subject
  • Put a little distance between your subject and the background
  • Backgrounds with individual, glowing points of light work well

 

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Give Your City Shots A Creative Twist With These 6 Top Tips

Give Your City Shots A Creative Twist With These 6 Top Tips

Thanks to high rise buildings, there are plenty of reflections offering us an alternative view to capture with our cameras in towns and cities up and down the country.

| 
Architecture

Sky reflected in windows

 

Thanks to modern architecture that favours glass and steel over bricks and mortar cities are full of reflections which give us an alternative way to photograph the places we live in.

 

1. Take A Walk 

You probably already know where you can find buildings with good reflective qualities in your town, but it’s still worth having a walk around at different times of the day to find out when it’s the best time to shoot.

 

2. Time Of The Day 

Surprisingly, with modern buildings bright sunlight can work really well so don’t think your hunt for reflections is only limited to early and late parts of the day. However, weekend mornings are a good time if you don’t want people in your shots but if there are people around, which may include security guards, and they ask you what you’re doing just polity tell them as it’s easier than having an argument and then them calling the police.

If you get a particularly spectacular sunset it’s worth hanging back as the colours look really good when reflected in modern glass. The same goes for blue skies and white fluffy clouds. In fact, if you have a building that stands away from the rest of the high risers you can almost lose it in the sky.

 

3. Make The Ordinary Look Fab

Reflections are a great way of making the ordinary look extraordinary too and items we see every day such as trees, colourful signs and lamp posts suddenly turn into an abstract image of wavy lines, shapes and colour. They also give you the opportunity to photograph a well-known building in a different way.

 

Pizza Shop

 

4. Where To Stand

You can photograph the building almost straight on to produce a simple reflection or see if there’s the opportunity to line up a shot where the real building meets the reflection so you can create a whole building from the two halves. The contrast of old vs new is something that’s always worked well and it’s not something that should be ignored here. A big, glass skyscraper reflecting an old, battered, slightly wonky pub can look really great.

 

5. Converging Vertical Issues

Don’t get too hung up about converging verticals as with some modern buildings they can create an interesting composition. It may distort your reflection though so it’s best to just experiment and see.

 

6. Go Wide & Add Detail 

If you do opt for using wides try giving your image a little foreground detail to fill what can be a big empty space and if you find you have a problem with glare at any time, just adjust your position until it’s no longer in the shot.

 

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6 Ways To Challenge Yourself & Improve Your Photography In The Process

6 Ways To Challenge Yourself & Improve Your Photography In The Process

Flower

 

If you’re looking for a way to improve your photography skills then a challenge is probably right up your street. To give you some inspiration on how you can challenge yourself next time you’re heading out with your camera here are 6 shooting suggestions that’ll get your grey matter working a little harder: 

 

1. Use One Lens /Focal Length

Basically, we want you to select one lens, yes just one, go for a walk, visit a museum etc. and see what images you can capture. Try to make it a lens you’ve not used for a while as this should make your work even harder. 

A lens with a fixed focal length would be our choice for this but if you only have a zoom take that along and pick just one focal length to use. If you don’t, it won’t be much of a challenge!

Before you start snapping away you really need to think about what you’re going to photograph because without a zoom your focal length is limited so rather than relying on the lens to do the work you have to get those grey cells warmed up and your feet moving to find a position/shot that works.
 

2. Limit The Shots You Take

As memory cards are reasonably priced and can hold hundreds if not thousands of images, it’s easy to just click the shutter button continuously and pick the best shots when you’re back home. However, by taking just one shot of each subject you plan on photographing you’ll have to really think about your composition, framing etc. as you don’t have the option of having another shot to correct your mistakes with. If you find this too restricting try setting a shot limit before you head out of the door and make sure you stick to it. By doing so you should be able to improve the quality of the images you take as you’ll be finding the best shots through planning and careful thought. 

 

3. Photograph Just One Colour

Pick a colour, it can be any colour, and stick with it. It can be similar objects or totally different subjects, but their colour must link. You can write down a colour then make a note of possible subjects that fit the theme or just head out and search for potential subjects with your camera in-hand. The final results can give you a great set of images that you can also use in a panel for your wall. 

 

Flower

4. Focus On One Subject 

Instead of taking many photos of a variety of subjects why not spend a day, or longer if you wish, photographing just one subject. Take a tree, for example, you can photograph the whole thing, get in close with a macro lens, capture shots of leaves, stand further back with a wide-angle lens and capture it in its landscape etc. Visit your subject at different times of the year or at different times of the day and pay attention to how the light changes and when it’s at its best. Venture out on foggy mornings, when the clouds are grey or when snow has covered the ground. You’ll end up with lots of images and not all will be great but there will be some gems and they could be from ways you’ve not considered photographing a particular subject before. 

 

5. Get Out Of Your Comfort Zone

It’s easy to stick with the familiar but by getting away from what you’re used to, you’ll discover new things and improve as a photographer in the process. So, if you tend to shoot landscapes, why not try photographing portraits instead? You’ll be shooting with different settings, lenses and in different ways, learning as you go and expanding your creativity. You’ll pick up new tips and more than likely learn more about the settings/options your camera has to offer, too. 

 

6. Enter A Photography Competition

If you’re out taking photos that are specifically for a competition you’ll probably think that bit longer about composition, lighting etc.to improve your chances of getting your hands on the top prize. It’s also a good way to find new subject inspiration for your shots as a vast number of themes are used in competitions right across the web as well as in magazines.

 

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Improve Your Battle Re-Enactment Photography With These 6 Simple Tips

Improve Your Battle Re-Enactment Photography With These 6 Simple Tips

We are heading back in time to capture the sights and sounds of a battle taking place at castles and other historical venues around the country.

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Portraits and People

Improve Your Battle Re-Enactment Photography With These 6 Simple Tips 1

 

The chances of us ever getting the opportunity to travel back in time to witness one of the many historical conflicts that the world’s seen is very slim. However, the sound of guns firing and an army marching can still be heard at battle re-enactments right across the country and they’re the perfect place for a photographer to snap a few images of times long gone.
 

1. What Gear Do I Need? 

You need a good, long lens as for safety reasons, you won’t be able to get right among the action. But also pack your wide lens for opportunities after the battle’s over. Spare memory cards, batteries and protective gear for yourself and your camera should also have a place in your bag. Take your tripod along too as in the middle of a battle when you’re trying to track the action, having your camera on a tripod will make life much easier. If it’s a popular event, you may find a monopod is easier to manage and won’t take up as much room.

 

2. Safety First

Before we talk about technique, we must mention safety. Safety is the number one concern of all the people taking part and the event organisers. You must obey the rules and if you’re not allowed in certain areas please don’t ignore the ropes and barriers that are put in place. They’re there to protect you and the people around you and stepping over them to get a better photo will only upset the proceedings.

 

3. Arrive Early

Battle re-enactments are popular events and crowds are challenging at the best of times and that’s before you’ve got your camera out! If you can, arrive early or stay later than the main crowd to maximise your chances of getting a collection of good shots.

 

4. Do Your Research

Prior to the main event familiarise yourself with the battlefield and find the best positions to photograph from. Find a spot that gives you a good viewpoint of the whole field and don’t forget about the background – you’ll be very annoyed when you get home if your brilliant battle shot is ruined by a burger van sitting in the background.

 

5. Capture Portraits

At some events, there will be a camp which you can walk around, soaking up the sights and sounds of the past. There will be plenty of people who often do expect to be photographed but do remember it’s always polite to ask permission first. It will also give you the chance to tell them a little bit about yourself and explain what you’re trying to achieve. This will also give you the chance to make sure the little details are correct. You’ll be surprised how asking someone to fasten a shirt higher or move a strand of hair out of the way will make a big difference to your final image.
 

6. Follow The Action

Once the battle begins, stick to your chosen position and make sure all of your attention is on the action. As your camera’s on a tripod you can use it as a spotting scope to home in on the action. Make sure you listen to the people who are part of the re-enactment too as the orders they shout out will help you know where you need to focus on the field. You’ll find fast shutter speeds are needed and make sure you have your panning technique perfected before you arrive so you don’t miss a shot.
 

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Improve Your Close-Up Portraits With Our 6 Top Tips

Improve Your Close-Up Portraits With Our 6 Top Tips

Our faces may be made up of the same components but the expressions, shapes, lines, tones and marks that decorate them all tell a unique story that’s waiting to be photographed.

| 
Portraits and People

Model

1. What Gear Should I Use? 

To feel connected to the person in the image, you need to get in close without invading personal space the easiest way to do this is with a telephoto zoom. Working hand-held is fine but if you prefer you can use a tripod
 

2. Be Polite

If you’re not working on a portrait shoot, it’s always polite to ask when photographing someone, especially when your focus is their face. After all, you don’t want them to suddenly turn around and scowl at you because they didn’t know you were taking their picture.
 

3. Eyes Need To Be Sharp

To really pick out the details that make a portrait captivating blur your background and always, always make sure the eyes are in focus. To stop the portrait looking lifeless make sure there’s a catch light in the eyes. A small burst of flash or having a light source behind the camera, facing the subject will help you do this.
 

4. Make Conversation 

Most people when they’re asked if they can have their photo taken become quite self-conscious and will grin like the Cheshire cat until you’ve finished. To combat this, you need to talk to them, and this is not only about what you’re trying to achieve but also ask them, about their life, what they do etc. Keep this conversation going, giving them pointers, and if it helps, compliments while you snap away. This will help them relax and soon they’ll have forgotten about the lens they have pointing their way.

Model

 

5. Give Guidance 

If you can, position your subject at a 45-degree angle and get them to turn their head to the camera as this can produce flattering results. However, directing them to look away, down or up will convey a completely different tone in the image. A sombre expression on a face that’s looking away from the camera can appear reflective while someone looking up or into the distance will have a sense of determination and strength.

 

6. Think About Backgrounds 

Your subject always has to be the centre of attention so if you do want to use surrounding scenery make sure it compliments the portrait and isn’t distracting. Back-lighting the subject can help with this as you’ll get a halo-like effect on your subject’s hair and body which will help them stand out from your background. If you’re using the sun as your backlight you’ll need to bounce light into the image to stop your subject appearing as a silhouette. To rectify this, bounce light onto your subject’s face with a reflector or you could use fill-in flash but you’ll need to make sure it’s stopped down so your portrait still looks natural.

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Take Better Photos At The Beach With These 6 Top Tips

Take Better Photos At The Beach With These 6 Top Tips

Coast

 

When the sun’s out us Brits pack the car up with buckets, spades, the dog and family members and head to the beach. But as well as eating ice cream and playing the odd game of cricket or rounders take some time out to take a few beach photos. It doesn’t even have to be a gloriously sunny day for photography either as waves crashing against the sea wall will look just as good as a family snap on the front.

 

1. Gear Suggestions

You won’t need a huge bag full of your fancy gear – you’ll have enough to carry with all of the cool boxes and beach gear anyway! Your interchangeable lens camera and a zoom lens are fine or even a point-and-shoot camera will be enough if you’re really lacking on space. Make space in your bag for a hotshoe flash for when the sun begins to set and if you’re worried about saltwater or sand getting into your camera put it in waterproof housing or if you’re using a point-and-shoot make it a waterproof one. Pack a blower to gently remove grains of sand that will land on your lens and have a microfibre cloth ready to wipe away sea spray.

 

2. Capturing Portraits

It’s most likely that your number one subject at the beach will be your family but you don’t always have to take shots of them grinning like Cheshire cats at you. Candids of them resting, playing in the sand, swimming or eating ice cream will work just as well, if not better than a posed, family portrait.

 

3. Lighting Tips 

Make sure you pay attention to where the sun is. It may work well for the sun to be behind you but this will only make your subject squint. Instead, move your subject into the shade of a brolly or have the sun behind them and use flash to fill in the shadows. Also, if you can, avoid taking photos at midday as the light’s harsh and causes long shadows.

 

Beach

 

4. Check Your Backgrounds

Keep away from distracting backgrounds and make sure you take a good look around the viewfinder before you take your shot as the odd bit of rubbish, which can spoil a shot, is easy to miss when you’re surrounded by so many interesting things. Make sure your subject fills the frame to stop attention going elsewhere and even though it may sound a little clichéd, silhouette shots of people do work well. Try using a telephoto lens to help you compose tightly and have your tripod to hand for those longer, evening exposures.

 

5. Don’t Forget Your Basic Beach Shots 

As well as people shots try a sweeping shot of the sea and beach, stretching out for miles. Early morning or later in the evening after all the tourists have gone will give you an empty beach to work with. However, not everyone has kids who will get out of bed early so if the only shot you can take is full of brollies and windbreakers in the afternoon do it. A busy beach, particularly if there’s not even standing room left, will always get a smile or you could try to clone them all out if you prefer a more natural shot.

 

6. Capturing Sunset Scenes 

Sunsets are, of course, a holiday snapshot favourite but as the sun’s not setting until late on you may want to head off for some food then return to the beach later once your stomach’s full.

If you do plan on photographing the sun as it sets DO NOT look at it through the camera lens and wait until it’s very low in the sky and diffused by the haze caused by pollution or clouds. If the sun’s your main focus, have it slightly off centre to make your final image more compositionally pleasing and don’t forget that having foreground as well as background interest works well in sunset shots.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

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How To Take Better Travel Photos – 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today

How To Take Better Travel Photos - 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today

Travel and holidays give us so many opportunities to photograph exotic locations, interesting people and other subjects we might not see at home. With this in mind, we’re sharing 6 travel-themed tutorials for you to peruse before your next trip.

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Landscape and Travel

How To Take Better Travel Photos - 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today 2

 

As we dream of jetting off to warmer climates in search of sea, sun and some scenic shots to photograph, we thought we’d put together a collection of top travel tutorials you really should have a look at before you head off with your case packed and photographic gear ready.

 

1. How To Improve Your Travel Photography Portraits Instantly

We share our tips on how to successfully photograph the people who live in the place you’re travelling to with kit advice, tips on framing and more. 

 

2. Six Awesome Travel Food Photography Tips For That Perfect Instagram Shot

As well as portraits and shots of beaches why not take a few photos of the plates of food you purchase? After all, getting your smartphone out before you chow down is the normal thing to do nowadays, isn’t it?

 

3. How To Photograph Ruins in 5 Easy Steps

Historical ruins such as churches, castles and abbeys decorate our countryside and seaside towns but you’ll also find a few smaller, but still impressive ruins closer to home. Walls, arches and columns are still dotted around a few towns and villages which are still photogenic even if there’s not much of the structure left to photograph. If you’re off on your travels, have a look online and at local tourism centres to find out what ruins are near to where you’re staying.

 

How To Take Better Travel Photos - 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today 3

 

 

4. How To Keep Shooting During Those Hot, Sunny Days

If you’re heading off on holiday here are a few tips to help you keep taking photos when it’s hot outside. Plus, as well as looking after your gear, don’t forget to look after yourself. It may seem obvious now, but it’s easy to get away with taking photos and the small things such as reapplying sunscreen and having a drink of water can be forgotten.

 

5. Ten Safety Tips For When Traveling With A Camera 

Here’s a quick list of quick but essential tips to help you keep your camera safe while on holiday. 

 

6. Learn To Convey A Sense Of Place And Culture With Your Travel Shots

When shooting travel images, as well as showing people back home that you had a really great time and that it was sunny every day, try capturing shots that convey a sense of place and culture as well. 

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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