Posted on Leave a comment

Give Your City Shots A Creative Twist With These 6 Top Tips

Give Your City Shots A Creative Twist With These 6 Top Tips

Thanks to high rise buildings, there are plenty of reflections offering us an alternative view to capture with our cameras in towns and cities up and down the country.

| 
Architecture

Sky reflected in windows

 

Thanks to modern architecture that favours glass and steel over bricks and mortar cities are full of reflections which give us an alternative way to photograph the places we live in.

 

1. Take A Walk 

You probably already know where you can find buildings with good reflective qualities in your town, but it’s still worth having a walk around at different times of the day to find out when it’s the best time to shoot.

 

2. Time Of The Day 

Surprisingly, with modern buildings bright sunlight can work really well so don’t think your hunt for reflections is only limited to early and late parts of the day. However, weekend mornings are a good time if you don’t want people in your shots but if there are people around, which may include security guards, and they ask you what you’re doing just polity tell them as it’s easier than having an argument and then them calling the police.

If you get a particularly spectacular sunset it’s worth hanging back as the colours look really good when reflected in modern glass. The same goes for blue skies and white fluffy clouds. In fact, if you have a building that stands away from the rest of the high risers you can almost lose it in the sky.

 

3. Make The Ordinary Look Fab

Reflections are a great way of making the ordinary look extraordinary too and items we see every day such as trees, colourful signs and lamp posts suddenly turn into an abstract image of wavy lines, shapes and colour. They also give you the opportunity to photograph a well-known building in a different way.

 

Pizza Shop

 

4. Where To Stand

You can photograph the building almost straight on to produce a simple reflection or see if there’s the opportunity to line up a shot where the real building meets the reflection so you can create a whole building from the two halves. The contrast of old vs new is something that’s always worked well and it’s not something that should be ignored here. A big, glass skyscraper reflecting an old, battered, slightly wonky pub can look really great.

 

5. Converging Vertical Issues

Don’t get too hung up about converging verticals as with some modern buildings they can create an interesting composition. It may distort your reflection though so it’s best to just experiment and see.

 

6. Go Wide & Add Detail 

If you do opt for using wides try giving your image a little foreground detail to fill what can be a big empty space and if you find you have a problem with glare at any time, just adjust your position until it’s no longer in the shot.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

6 Ways To Challenge Yourself & Improve Your Photography In The Process

6 Ways To Challenge Yourself & Improve Your Photography In The Process

Flower

 

If you’re looking for a way to improve your photography skills then a challenge is probably right up your street. To give you some inspiration on how you can challenge yourself next time you’re heading out with your camera here are 6 shooting suggestions that’ll get your grey matter working a little harder: 

 

1. Use One Lens /Focal Length

Basically, we want you to select one lens, yes just one, go for a walk, visit a museum etc. and see what images you can capture. Try to make it a lens you’ve not used for a while as this should make your work even harder. 

A lens with a fixed focal length would be our choice for this but if you only have a zoom take that along and pick just one focal length to use. If you don’t, it won’t be much of a challenge!

Before you start snapping away you really need to think about what you’re going to photograph because without a zoom your focal length is limited so rather than relying on the lens to do the work you have to get those grey cells warmed up and your feet moving to find a position/shot that works.
 

2. Limit The Shots You Take

As memory cards are reasonably priced and can hold hundreds if not thousands of images, it’s easy to just click the shutter button continuously and pick the best shots when you’re back home. However, by taking just one shot of each subject you plan on photographing you’ll have to really think about your composition, framing etc. as you don’t have the option of having another shot to correct your mistakes with. If you find this too restricting try setting a shot limit before you head out of the door and make sure you stick to it. By doing so you should be able to improve the quality of the images you take as you’ll be finding the best shots through planning and careful thought. 

 

3. Photograph Just One Colour

Pick a colour, it can be any colour, and stick with it. It can be similar objects or totally different subjects, but their colour must link. You can write down a colour then make a note of possible subjects that fit the theme or just head out and search for potential subjects with your camera in-hand. The final results can give you a great set of images that you can also use in a panel for your wall. 

 

Flower

4. Focus On One Subject 

Instead of taking many photos of a variety of subjects why not spend a day, or longer if you wish, photographing just one subject. Take a tree, for example, you can photograph the whole thing, get in close with a macro lens, capture shots of leaves, stand further back with a wide-angle lens and capture it in its landscape etc. Visit your subject at different times of the year or at different times of the day and pay attention to how the light changes and when it’s at its best. Venture out on foggy mornings, when the clouds are grey or when snow has covered the ground. You’ll end up with lots of images and not all will be great but there will be some gems and they could be from ways you’ve not considered photographing a particular subject before. 

 

5. Get Out Of Your Comfort Zone

It’s easy to stick with the familiar but by getting away from what you’re used to, you’ll discover new things and improve as a photographer in the process. So, if you tend to shoot landscapes, why not try photographing portraits instead? You’ll be shooting with different settings, lenses and in different ways, learning as you go and expanding your creativity. You’ll pick up new tips and more than likely learn more about the settings/options your camera has to offer, too. 

 

6. Enter A Photography Competition

If you’re out taking photos that are specifically for a competition you’ll probably think that bit longer about composition, lighting etc.to improve your chances of getting your hands on the top prize. It’s also a good way to find new subject inspiration for your shots as a vast number of themes are used in competitions right across the web as well as in magazines.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Improve Your Battle Re-Enactment Photography With These 6 Simple Tips

Improve Your Battle Re-Enactment Photography With These 6 Simple Tips

We are heading back in time to capture the sights and sounds of a battle taking place at castles and other historical venues around the country.

| 
Portraits and People

Improve Your Battle Re-Enactment Photography With These 6 Simple Tips 1

 

The chances of us ever getting the opportunity to travel back in time to witness one of the many historical conflicts that the world’s seen is very slim. However, the sound of guns firing and an army marching can still be heard at battle re-enactments right across the country and they’re the perfect place for a photographer to snap a few images of times long gone.
 

1. What Gear Do I Need? 

You need a good, long lens as for safety reasons, you won’t be able to get right among the action. But also pack your wide lens for opportunities after the battle’s over. Spare memory cards, batteries and protective gear for yourself and your camera should also have a place in your bag. Take your tripod along too as in the middle of a battle when you’re trying to track the action, having your camera on a tripod will make life much easier. If it’s a popular event, you may find a monopod is easier to manage and won’t take up as much room.

 

2. Safety First

Before we talk about technique, we must mention safety. Safety is the number one concern of all the people taking part and the event organisers. You must obey the rules and if you’re not allowed in certain areas please don’t ignore the ropes and barriers that are put in place. They’re there to protect you and the people around you and stepping over them to get a better photo will only upset the proceedings.

 

3. Arrive Early

Battle re-enactments are popular events and crowds are challenging at the best of times and that’s before you’ve got your camera out! If you can, arrive early or stay later than the main crowd to maximise your chances of getting a collection of good shots.

 

4. Do Your Research

Prior to the main event familiarise yourself with the battlefield and find the best positions to photograph from. Find a spot that gives you a good viewpoint of the whole field and don’t forget about the background – you’ll be very annoyed when you get home if your brilliant battle shot is ruined by a burger van sitting in the background.

 

5. Capture Portraits

At some events, there will be a camp which you can walk around, soaking up the sights and sounds of the past. There will be plenty of people who often do expect to be photographed but do remember it’s always polite to ask permission first. It will also give you the chance to tell them a little bit about yourself and explain what you’re trying to achieve. This will also give you the chance to make sure the little details are correct. You’ll be surprised how asking someone to fasten a shirt higher or move a strand of hair out of the way will make a big difference to your final image.
 

6. Follow The Action

Once the battle begins, stick to your chosen position and make sure all of your attention is on the action. As your camera’s on a tripod you can use it as a spotting scope to home in on the action. Make sure you listen to the people who are part of the re-enactment too as the orders they shout out will help you know where you need to focus on the field. You’ll find fast shutter speeds are needed and make sure you have your panning technique perfected before you arrive so you don’t miss a shot.
 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Improve Your Close-Up Portraits With Our 6 Top Tips

Improve Your Close-Up Portraits With Our 6 Top Tips

Our faces may be made up of the same components but the expressions, shapes, lines, tones and marks that decorate them all tell a unique story that’s waiting to be photographed.

| 
Portraits and People

Model

1. What Gear Should I Use? 

To feel connected to the person in the image, you need to get in close without invading personal space the easiest way to do this is with a telephoto zoom. Working hand-held is fine but if you prefer you can use a tripod
 

2. Be Polite

If you’re not working on a portrait shoot, it’s always polite to ask when photographing someone, especially when your focus is their face. After all, you don’t want them to suddenly turn around and scowl at you because they didn’t know you were taking their picture.
 

3. Eyes Need To Be Sharp

To really pick out the details that make a portrait captivating blur your background and always, always make sure the eyes are in focus. To stop the portrait looking lifeless make sure there’s a catch light in the eyes. A small burst of flash or having a light source behind the camera, facing the subject will help you do this.
 

4. Make Conversation 

Most people when they’re asked if they can have their photo taken become quite self-conscious and will grin like the Cheshire cat until you’ve finished. To combat this, you need to talk to them, and this is not only about what you’re trying to achieve but also ask them, about their life, what they do etc. Keep this conversation going, giving them pointers, and if it helps, compliments while you snap away. This will help them relax and soon they’ll have forgotten about the lens they have pointing their way.

Model

 

5. Give Guidance 

If you can, position your subject at a 45-degree angle and get them to turn their head to the camera as this can produce flattering results. However, directing them to look away, down or up will convey a completely different tone in the image. A sombre expression on a face that’s looking away from the camera can appear reflective while someone looking up or into the distance will have a sense of determination and strength.

 

6. Think About Backgrounds 

Your subject always has to be the centre of attention so if you do want to use surrounding scenery make sure it compliments the portrait and isn’t distracting. Back-lighting the subject can help with this as you’ll get a halo-like effect on your subject’s hair and body which will help them stand out from your background. If you’re using the sun as your backlight you’ll need to bounce light into the image to stop your subject appearing as a silhouette. To rectify this, bounce light onto your subject’s face with a reflector or you could use fill-in flash but you’ll need to make sure it’s stopped down so your portrait still looks natural.

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Take Better Photos At The Beach With These 6 Top Tips

Take Better Photos At The Beach With These 6 Top Tips

Coast

 

When the sun’s out us Brits pack the car up with buckets, spades, the dog and family members and head to the beach. But as well as eating ice cream and playing the odd game of cricket or rounders take some time out to take a few beach photos. It doesn’t even have to be a gloriously sunny day for photography either as waves crashing against the sea wall will look just as good as a family snap on the front.

 

1. Gear Suggestions

You won’t need a huge bag full of your fancy gear – you’ll have enough to carry with all of the cool boxes and beach gear anyway! Your interchangeable lens camera and a zoom lens are fine or even a point-and-shoot camera will be enough if you’re really lacking on space. Make space in your bag for a hotshoe flash for when the sun begins to set and if you’re worried about saltwater or sand getting into your camera put it in waterproof housing or if you’re using a point-and-shoot make it a waterproof one. Pack a blower to gently remove grains of sand that will land on your lens and have a microfibre cloth ready to wipe away sea spray.

 

2. Capturing Portraits

It’s most likely that your number one subject at the beach will be your family but you don’t always have to take shots of them grinning like Cheshire cats at you. Candids of them resting, playing in the sand, swimming or eating ice cream will work just as well, if not better than a posed, family portrait.

 

3. Lighting Tips 

Make sure you pay attention to where the sun is. It may work well for the sun to be behind you but this will only make your subject squint. Instead, move your subject into the shade of a brolly or have the sun behind them and use flash to fill in the shadows. Also, if you can, avoid taking photos at midday as the light’s harsh and causes long shadows.

 

Beach

 

4. Check Your Backgrounds

Keep away from distracting backgrounds and make sure you take a good look around the viewfinder before you take your shot as the odd bit of rubbish, which can spoil a shot, is easy to miss when you’re surrounded by so many interesting things. Make sure your subject fills the frame to stop attention going elsewhere and even though it may sound a little clichéd, silhouette shots of people do work well. Try using a telephoto lens to help you compose tightly and have your tripod to hand for those longer, evening exposures.

 

5. Don’t Forget Your Basic Beach Shots 

As well as people shots try a sweeping shot of the sea and beach, stretching out for miles. Early morning or later in the evening after all the tourists have gone will give you an empty beach to work with. However, not everyone has kids who will get out of bed early so if the only shot you can take is full of brollies and windbreakers in the afternoon do it. A busy beach, particularly if there’s not even standing room left, will always get a smile or you could try to clone them all out if you prefer a more natural shot.

 

6. Capturing Sunset Scenes 

Sunsets are, of course, a holiday snapshot favourite but as the sun’s not setting until late on you may want to head off for some food then return to the beach later once your stomach’s full.

If you do plan on photographing the sun as it sets DO NOT look at it through the camera lens and wait until it’s very low in the sky and diffused by the haze caused by pollution or clouds. If the sun’s your main focus, have it slightly off centre to make your final image more compositionally pleasing and don’t forget that having foreground as well as background interest works well in sunset shots.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

How To Take Better Travel Photos – 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today

How To Take Better Travel Photos - 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today

Travel and holidays give us so many opportunities to photograph exotic locations, interesting people and other subjects we might not see at home. With this in mind, we’re sharing 6 travel-themed tutorials for you to peruse before your next trip.

| 
Landscape and Travel

How To Take Better Travel Photos - 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today 2

 

As we dream of jetting off to warmer climates in search of sea, sun and some scenic shots to photograph, we thought we’d put together a collection of top travel tutorials you really should have a look at before you head off with your case packed and photographic gear ready.

 

1. How To Improve Your Travel Photography Portraits Instantly

We share our tips on how to successfully photograph the people who live in the place you’re travelling to with kit advice, tips on framing and more. 

 

2. Six Awesome Travel Food Photography Tips For That Perfect Instagram Shot

As well as portraits and shots of beaches why not take a few photos of the plates of food you purchase? After all, getting your smartphone out before you chow down is the normal thing to do nowadays, isn’t it?

 

3. How To Photograph Ruins in 5 Easy Steps

Historical ruins such as churches, castles and abbeys decorate our countryside and seaside towns but you’ll also find a few smaller, but still impressive ruins closer to home. Walls, arches and columns are still dotted around a few towns and villages which are still photogenic even if there’s not much of the structure left to photograph. If you’re off on your travels, have a look online and at local tourism centres to find out what ruins are near to where you’re staying.

 

How To Take Better Travel Photos - 6 Top Tutorials For You To Read Today 3

 

 

4. How To Keep Shooting During Those Hot, Sunny Days

If you’re heading off on holiday here are a few tips to help you keep taking photos when it’s hot outside. Plus, as well as looking after your gear, don’t forget to look after yourself. It may seem obvious now, but it’s easy to get away with taking photos and the small things such as reapplying sunscreen and having a drink of water can be forgotten.

 

5. Ten Safety Tips For When Traveling With A Camera 

Here’s a quick list of quick but essential tips to help you keep your camera safe while on holiday. 

 

6. Learn To Convey A Sense Of Place And Culture With Your Travel Shots

When shooting travel images, as well as showing people back home that you had a really great time and that it was sunny every day, try capturing shots that convey a sense of place and culture as well. 

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

6 Top Tips On Photographing Trees & Leaves

6 Top Tips On Photographing Trees & Leaves

Park

 

We have plenty of woodlands to photograph and as rain showers are common at this time of year, greens will be more vibrant so now is a perfect time to photograph them. Plus, you can use these tips in Autumn, Winter and Spring, too, giving you a plethora of images to capture. 

 

1. Gear Suggestions

Tree

 

You can use a variety of lenses from wide-angle to shorter telephotos, you could even use a compact camera if you so wish. Make sure you pack a sturdy tripod as light can be low in dense woodland areas and, plus you’ll need one for macro work you’ll find a polarising filter handy as they boost colours and reduce reflections if you happen to be near water. If you’re headed for a long-ish walk consider taking a backpack as these bag styles offer plenty of room for outdoor essentials as they tend to have side mesh pockets for water bottles and smaller compartments for guides, food etc. Invest in a remote release or, if you prefer, make use of your camera’s self-timer for close up work and have a lens cloth to hand to wipe any smears or smudges off your lens.

 

2. Head For The Woods

Woods

 

We’re never too far away from trees, in fact, many of us will have them in our gardens or on our streets. But even though we have good specimens close to home, to get really cracking shots, you need to venture to the woods or local gardens. Woods are welcoming for photographers but some gardens and other sites don’t allow tripods so check before you lug it all that way. For shots of groups of trees, step back and photograph the whole woodland scene or crop in for a more arty feel.

 

3. Time Of Day

Leaves on a tree

 

Even under the forest canopy light in the middle of the day can cause too much contrast so you’re much better off heading out early or waiting for the sun to drop a little. Don’t think you should stay in on overcast days either as these are perfect for some close-up photography.

 

4. Patterns And Textures 

Tree trunk

 

Single trees look good isolated but if you’re in the middle of the woods it’s better to get closer. Look lower and you’ll be able to add some texture to your images by focusing on the trunk. Make sure you look for patterns in the bark then turn your attention to bigger patterns searching for lines of trees that create strong, symmetrical images.

 

5. Other Objects 

 Sculpture

 

Look for man-made objects such as benches or even statues too as these will contrast well against the soft colours of nature.

 

6. Leaves

Branch

 

If you have a bright blue sky look up at the canopy and concentrate on the leaves. Greens contrast well against a blue sky or you could crop in and really focus on the details of the veins. Just make sure you’re not photographing ones that have been half-chewed by a bug! A 100mm macro lens will get you in close enough but if you want to create more detailed shots try using an extension tube or coupling rings on two lenses.

When you’re out looking for leaves don’t pick up ones that are too thick as light won’t shine through them enough and select ones that have different patterns otherwise your job will get a little repetitive.
 

Photographing Leaves At Home

On rainy days, you can shoot images of leaves in the comfort of your own home. You just need a lightbox or you could use a window and tape your leaf to it. You can shoot one leaf, making the patterns created by the veins your focus or try placing a collection of leaves together to create a busier look. You’ll see that backlight highlights the leaves’ shape beautifully and really punches the veins out. You’ll also find the colour appears to be more vibrant, and as there’s no breeze, you can take all the time in the world to frame and get your shot right.

Do clean the leaf with a little water before you photograph it and make sure you dry it gently as you don’t want it to split. Finally, once you’ve shot your images, run them through some editing software to check for imperfections before you hit print. 

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

6 Top Tips On How & Why To Capture Creative Abstract Photos Of Water Bubbles

6 Top Tips On How & Why To Capture Creative Abstract Photos Of Water Bubbles

I know the first thing some people will ask: ‘why?’ Well, to be fair, that is a perfectly sound question and yes, why bother standing in a stream and shoot water bubbles. To me, it is because you can and with digital there is no cost. It is also a nice break from the usual blurred water shots that many of us love. So, while you are out there doing waterfalls, spend a few minutes afterwards trying this subject.
 

“It is fun, challenging and you may even like the results. In fact, if you want some abstracts to hang up, this technique is worth trying”, ePHOTOzine.

Of course, you can shoot water bubbles in the bath, should you feel that way inclined. However, this idea is water bubbles in a babbling brook or at the foot of a waterfall. Health and safety point here: Please take care on slippery rocks and obviously take care of your kit.

6 Top Tips On How & Why To Capture Creative Abstract Photos Of Water Bubbles 4

 

1. Take A Support

You could, of course, use a tripod and position the camera so it is pointing down. Tripods that have a centre column that can be swung round to horizontal make it easier to shoot down onto the water’s surface as well as offering more support than working hand-held will. Do make sure your tripod is secure and balanced so it won’t fall over, camera first into the stream or river you’re photographing.
 

2. Pick The Right Lenses

Lens-wise, try your lens’s macro feature or use a macro lens. A macro lens used close up is perfect, but there won’t be a great deal of depth-of-field at such fast shutter speeds. Setting a high ISO is an option, but that depends on the noise performance of your camera.

3. Dress Appropriately

Wear sturdy boots, making sure they are waterproof if you’re planning on standing in a stream. Wellies or waders mean that you have more freedom regarding camera position but you can just find a suitable spot by keeping your feet dry and standing on a rock or something. You’ll also need a warm, waterproof jacket, particularly at this time of year when a rain shower is a common thing. Various jackets and photographer’s vests are available on the market.
 

4. Choose The Right Shutter Speeds

Find yourself a good spot in the stream. This can be in a sunbeam or it can be in the shade. However, very fast shutter speeds are the order of the day, so check the lighting and if you are getting 1/1000sec or more, great. It is an opportunity to explore those speeds of 1/2000sec and 1/4000sec. As with blurring flowing water, try different shutter speeds. Flash is worth a try too.

  

5. Let’s Talk About Focus And Exposure

Exposure and focusing are technical challenges. Your camera is not going to manage to autofocus – water bubbles do not hang around waiting for your AF to kick in. The best thing is to focus manually and then change the camera position to get sharp focus. The reject rate will be high.

Exposure can be tricky because you have a bright, sunlit bubble against a dark background, and the scene is constantly changing. Like focusing, taking the manual option is worth serious thought. Meter manually, shoot some frames and make adjustments. Once you have metered for a particular lighting situation, it is time to start shooting.
 

6. Don’t Stop Shooting

Shoot lots. You are not going to get the perfect picture in a couple of frames. You will find that the micro landscape in front of you is never the same twice – miss a shot and you are not going to get another identical shot. Put in a positive way, every shot you take will be unique – no question. You can also play around with your images in Photoshop, flipping images to create interesting patterns etc. 

 

6 Top Tips On How & Why To Capture Creative Abstract Photos Of Water Bubbles 5

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

6 Awesome Travel Food Photography Tips For That Perfect Instagram Shot

6 Awesome Travel Food Photography Tips For That Perfect Instagram Shot

Gyros

 

 

It’s coming up to that time of year when many families start to think about jetting off to warmer climates or simply heading to the Britsh coast to escape reality for a while. An accessory that’s guaranteed to be packed is a camera but instead of just capturing shots of family members in pools and on the beach, why not turn your attention to food photography and capture some mouth-watering images of the plates you’re served and stalls you pass on trips. 

 

1. Where Will You Be Taking Your Photos? 

Where you’re working can sometimes determine what equipment you can use. If you’re in a busy restaurant there’s probably not room for a tripod so you’ll have to work hand-held or use a smaller support that can fit on the table. But if you’re out in the street photographing food stalls and the people who run them, they’ll be more room to use a tripod, although if you plan on moving around a lot, you’ll probably better taking a monopod with you as they’re easier to walk with and take up less room.
 

2. Think About Presentation 

Restaurants want to impress you so food is, generally, presented and displayed well already which means you don’t have to play the role of the designer. Do look out for attractive produce though, particularly if you’re at a hotel where you can serve yourself. Make sure fruit isn’t bruised and colours are vibrant. If you’re photographing meat make sure it’s not overcooked and lookout for herbs and pepper grinders as a sprinkling of pepper or a few green leaves can make your photograph looking more appetising. Also, look out for crumbs and sauce that may be sat on the side of the plate as this can distract the viewer.

 

Pancakes

 

3. Consider Using Repetition 

If you can pick your own food, repetition works well and three items on a plate will often look better than two. Don’t think you always have to centre your subject and if you’re working with tall items such as ice creams and coffees in glasses, switch your orientation to portrait.

 

4. Backgrounds Shouldn’t Distract

Try and keep your background uncluttered but if you’re in a busy restaurant where this isn’t possible, just use a wide aperture to throw the background out of focus or you could try placing a plain jacket/cloth over a chair and positioning so it sits in the background of your shot. If the chairs are too low use the back of a menu, so long as it’s plain, as your background, placing it behind your plate. If it’s coloured make sure there’s no colour cast on your food/plate, particularly if the crockery is white and a shallow depth of field will help keep all attention on the food in the foreground of your shot.

Don’t forget to take some wider shots of the serving area too. In hotels particularly you’ll find several buffet carts, chefs preparing food and guests deciding what to eat which can make interesting shots. 

 

Pastries

 

5. Stick To Natural Light

Use natural light where possible so if you can pick where you sit, choose a window seat or better still, sit outside. You need to avoid using direct flash as your food won’t look very appetising so make sure you’ve switched it off, particularly in low light situations where some flashes will automatically fire.

 

6. Get Out On The Street 

Away from restaurants, you can find small stalls, especially in markets, that make and sell food. If you want to snap a few shots of the stallholder it can help if you actually show some interest in the food they are producing. It’s not always advised to eat the food they’re cooking but you can ask them questions and spend some time actually appreciating their skill. If you’re working close up never shoot without asking permission first and if they say no, just move on to another stall instead of arguing with them. For those who do agree, fill the frame with their face as you’ll find they’ll create plenty of interesting expressions when concentrating on getting their creation perfect.

If your subject is working under a canopy your camera can get confused by the brighter space that surrounds them and your shot can end up a little dark. If this is the case, just lock your exposure and recompose the shot.

 

6 Awesome Travel Food Photography Tips For That Perfect Instagram Shot 6

If the weather’s not playing ball or you’re on a street that’s shaded from the sun don’t be tempted to use your flash as this can destroy the feeling/atmosphere you’re trying to create. Just try using a wider aperture or a higher ISO and if you find the higher ISOs make your shot a little grainy, try turning the shot black and white as it can work rather well.

Another option is to use a tripod and slower shutter speeds which will blur the movement of anyone who passes through your shot, however, if you’re focusing on someone who is moving between a chopping board and a stove, the blur can emphasise the speed they’re working at. The slower shutter speeds can also be used to capture a few closer shots of flames, just make sure you don’t burn yourself and don’t catch any hot plates and pans by mistake.
 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

6 Top Tips On How To Photograph Boats

6 Top Tips On How To Photograph Boats

Boat

 

 

Due to the size of the UK, we’re usually not a million miles from the coast where you’ll find fishing boats and tourist boats galore to photograph. Further inland, there are rivers with boats, canal and inland waterways or even water-sports centre where you can capture action-packed images as well as shots of pedalos and canoes.

 

1. What Kit Should I Choose? 

For most boat photography a standard zoom of the 35-80mm range is fine. It’s usually wide enough to get the whole boat in shot and long enough to crop in on sails, hull, lifebuoy on the side or other finer detail. You may prefer a longer lens 80-200mm if the boat is further away or to shoot small detail like mini flags, portraits of crew etc. and a lens with a close focus ability is good for detail in ropes, paintwork etc. when the boat is moored.

A polarising filter is a must to ensure reflections are reduced on the paintwork and to deepen a blue sky and cut down on reflections in the water. A graduated filter is useful if the boats are set against a bright sky, although watch for darkening of the mast and upper sails on yachts and such like.

If you plan on shooting panoramic photos of harbours and marinas, pack your tripod. 

 

2. Head To A Harbour 

Harbours conjure up picturesque scenes with colourful boats offset against beautiful blue skies, reflected in the waters below.  To get this sort of picture you need a sunny day with still waters. Use a polarising filter to make the colours more saturated and choose viewpoints without too much clutter. A single boat in the foreground makes a more impressive shot than one where several boats are fighting for your attention.

 

Boats

 

3. Wait For The Tide 

As the tide goes out you can photograph moored boats grounded in mud, or on the beach. Use the mooring ropes as a lead-in up through the photo. A small aperture is needed to ensure everything from the front of the rope to the distant boat is sharp. Shots will be more dramatic if you shoot from a low angle and include a brooding sky. Use a graduated grey or ND filter to darken the sky.

 

4. Walk Along A River Bank 

If you aren’t near a coastal location you may have a river running nearby that has boats on it. You may get sailing boats, small cargo boats, river authority working boats or even barges. There will usually be speed limits of around 5mph which means that you don’t need to worry about panning skills or the need for ultra-fast shutter speeds to shoot boats on rivers. For more impact shoot from a low angle (at the side of the river on a low bank point is best). Try to include interesting landmarks in the background, trees or the odd building at the edge of the frame to hold the viewer inside that frame and focused on the boat.

If there’s a bridge find a position where you can use that as a frame as the boat passes under, but watch the exposure. The light under the bridge will be lower than the outside so it’s easy to underexpose if your meter picks up the brighter area as the important part. Switch to spot metering where possible and take a meter reading from the sidewall of the bridge and use that as the starting point.

 

Boat on a river

 

5. Make A Canal Your Focus

Canals run through many countries too. With these, you not only have boats to photograph but also the activities surrounding them. Barges are usually hand-painted and are very colourful. They often have matching watering cans or flower pots that are crying out to be photographed.  Shoot with a telephoto and wide aperture to blur the background. Focus on small areas of paintwork for patterns and interesting window displays. Find a spot where there’s a lock and then you can photograph the activity as the barge is taken to the next water level.

 

6. Interested In Watersports? 

For those who prefer a little more action consider a day out at a water-sports centre. These locations are usually on man-made lakes around the country and offer sports enthusiasts opportunities to sail, water-ski or jet-ski. It’s at these locations where you can shoot the speed. For the best results, it helps if you pan with the craft.

Experiment with the shutter speed to get the right amount of motion. Follow the boats and shoot as it reaches a central point of your pan. This will blur the background but if you are keeping at the same speed as the boat as you pan it will be sharp. Try to avoid moving the camera up or down as you pan.

Some have rapids for canoeing. here a fast shutter speed can be used to get the water droplets frozen as they splash around the canoe. Take shots as the canoeist comes up from a 360 roll water will be dripping off his face and he’s likely to have a great air gasping expression.

 

Boats
 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link