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9 Bad Weather Photography Tips

9 Bad Weather Photography Tips

Landscape

Photo by David Pritchard

 

 

1. ‘There’s No Such Thing As Bad Weather’

Top landscape photographer John Gravett once said: “There is no such thing as bad weather – only different types of lighting,” and he couldn’t be more correct. Just because the light’s dull doesn’t mean you still can’t capture good shots, you just have to think a bit differently. The same goes for rain which, in fact, can help you capture cracking landscapes. Try to not leave the door with the mindset that you’ll be battling bad weather instead, think how you can use it to your advantage. 

 

2. Dress For The Weather

Staying dry will keep you in a more positive frame of mind so make sure you have waterproof clothing protecting you from head-to-toe. Without it, you’ll just get soaked when it’s raining which will just make you miserable and taking photos will probably not be at the top of your list. A coat with a hood, waterproof trousers and a good pair of boots should keep you dry. A decent pair of socks and layers will keep you warm but it’s down to personal choice if you wear a pair of gloves or not as fleece gloves will just become sodden and not pleasant to wear. 

 

3. Take The Right Bag

You can buy water- and weatherproof camera bags that’ll keep your gear dry, plus many styles of camera bag now come with a waterproof cover built-in. If you’re using a bag that doesn’t have this feature, it’s really worth spending a few pounds and investing in one. After all, a waterproof cover is cheaper to buy than new equipment! Check out our complete guide to camera bags.

 

4. Protect Your Camera And Lenses

Many companies are now bringing weather-sealed equipment to the market, but it’s always worth adding a waterproof cover just in case. You can purchase rain sleeves which fit over your camera and lens, plus some are made to measure for your specific kit. Some photographers have used plastic bags to protect their gear in the past but obviously, this isn’t the best method and will certainly not work in heavy downpours.

On wet weather days when it’s humid, you can get condensation build-up on the inside of the cover as too can putting damp hands inside the cover to adjust your lens, which means water will be sat against your kit so do pack a cloth you can wipe your kit with if needs be. 

 

5. Take A Tripod Out With You

Lighting levels will be lower on cloudy, rainy days which means exposures will be longer so a tripod is an essential piece of kit. Plus, if you’re using a rain cover, they don’t tend to fit round camera straps very well so using a tripod is your best option. 

 

6. Pack A Lens Cloth

You may want to capture rain-filled images, but this doesn’t mean you want water droplets to sit on your lens. Rain on your lens will spoil your shots so do take the time to dry the lens before hitting the shutter button. If you’re going to be out for a longer period of time you’ll want to pack several lens cloths as you won’t achieve much if you try and dry a lens with an already damp cloth.

 

 

Mountains

Photo by David Pritchard

 

7. Choosing Lenses 

Landscapes aren’t just about wide-angle lenses as telephoto lenses can really help you capture some interesting images. In a previous article, John Gravett said: “Rain is wonderful at creating recession, in landscape pictures. Using a telephoto lens to compress perspective along with the recessive nature of the weather can create some truly striking images.”

 

8. Try Working In Black & White 

A shot that looks dull and boring in colour can be transformed into a great moody mono. Plus, you’ll be able to emphasise texture and tones, enhancing the mood and elements in your shots by shooting in black and white. 

 

9. Foreground Interest

Adding foreground interest to landscape images is something that should always be considered and this becomes even more important when shooting in the rain, as John Gravett explains: “Landscapes can often look moody and impressive when photographed in bad weather. Similarly, they can also look pastel and delicate – particularly when shooting over lakes or bodies of water. I generally try to include some foreground interest or dark element within the picture as a contrast to the overall light tones of a drizzly day. Make sure your expose “to the right” – firstly, it will maximise your data, and secondly, it will give you a high key feel rather than a dull, grey overcast look; that alone will make your thumbnails on your computer more appealing….Heavy rain can totally obscure background elements in a landscape, changing the emphasis from the overall landscape to elements in the foreground, which can so often get overlooked.”

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9 Ways To Stop Unsightly Backgrounds Spoiling Your Shots

9 Ways To Stop Unsightly Backgrounds Spoiling Your Shots

Daisy

 

Before you take your shot, take a good look around the viewfinder to make sure everything that’s in the frame needs to be. If it doesn’t, here are a few ways you can remove the unwanted object(s) and some ideas on what things you should avoid capturing in your frame.

 

 

What Should I Be Looking Out For? 

 

1. Check The Frame For Unsightly Objects

Items such as rubbish bins, dead trees, shopping trolleys in rivers and broken benches do have significance and a place in some photographs but most of the time they’re on the ‘try to avoid list’. You don’t want a microwave or mattress spoiling your idyllic landscape shot. 

 

2. Make Sure Poles Aren’t Sticking Out Of Heads

If you’re shooting portraits outdoors make sure you don’t position your subject so it looks like they have a lamppost, telephone pole, tree or any other object sticking out of the top of their head. In some cases, it can look quite amusing but more often than not it’s just a distraction.
 

3. Look Out For Distracting Highlights

Areas of an image that are overexposed or particularly bright will draw the eye away from what it should be looking at to it. To stop this, make sure the image is exposed correctly and look out for reflective or other bright surfaces that could cause you problems. The same goes for particularly shadowy areas, too.

 

4. Be Careful With Bright Colours

As with highlights, if you have an object that’s brightly coloured that isn’t your main focus of the shot it can pull the eye to it. Yellowjackets that officials wear at races and other events are a good example of this. Most of the time you won’t want them to be the focus of the shot, but they will be in the background and their bright coloured jackets stand out like spotlights, pulling the focus of the image to them.

5. Be Aware Of Busy Backgrounds

When you’re shooting portraits, of any kind, unless the background adds to the shot you’ll probably want to blur it out of view. This is true for macro work too such as when you’re working in the garden, focusing on one flower that’s sat against a background of garden equipment and other distracting objects.

 

Autumn leaf with bokeh background

 

How Do I Fix The Above Problems? 

 

1. Move Your Subject

If you can’t move the object that’s causing the problem the easiest way to get the empty background you’re looking for is to move your subject. This doesn’t mean picking a new location to shoot in as moving them a couple of steps to the left or right of where they first stood could fix your problem.

 

2. Move Yourself

If you have to shoot against the particular part of the background you positioned your subject against then pick up your kit and move yourself so the object that’s causing the distraction is no longer in the frame.

 

3. Change Angle

Can you shoot from higher up or lower down? You may find a change in angle gives you a new take on a shot that’s overdone. This technique works particularly well for flowers as you can use the sky as a clutter-free background for your images if you’re garden’s full of distracting objects.

 

4. Create Your Own Background

For small subjects such as plants, you can use pieces of card and material as backgrounds for your shots, hiding the scene in front of you behind it.

 

5. Use A Different Focal Length

If you’ve got a variety of lenses to hand or have packed a zoom lens, try cropping in to remove whatever is distracting the eye.

 

 

Jet

 

6. Change Orientation

If you don’t have a variety of focal lengths to-hand try switching from landscape to portrait orientation.

 

7. Blur The Background

If you don’t need the background to be in focus use a wider aperture to throw it out of focus. If you’re using a compact camera switch to macro mode for close-up work as your camera will select a larger aperture so the background’s thrown out of focus. If you’re shooting portraits with a compact select Portrait Mode as, again, your camera will know it needs to use a larger aperture so the background’s out of focus.

 

8. Use Foreground Detail As A Frame

If it’s branches and leaves that are causing you problems why not blur them to create a soft, out of focus frame for your image? For more tips on framing take a look at our previous article: Ten Top Ways To Use Frames In Your Images.
 

9. Experiment With Longer Shutter Speeds In Cities

If you’re working in a place that’s full of people and you don’t want them in your shot, use longer exposures to remove them. This works particularly well at night and is the same technique photographers use to capture light trails in night shots.

The problem with using longer shutter speeds in the daytime is the amount of light that will reach your camera’s sensor and you can end up with very overexposed shots. But try using a small aperture such as f/22 and find a location which is slightly shaded and experiment to see if it’ll work. Using an ND filter will also help you get the slower shutter speeds you need. If you’re photographing city streets at night and only want the lights, traffic and buildings to appear in the shot, this technique works particularly well at removing people from the scene.

 

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How To Prepare For Amazon Prime Day 2021 – 9 Top Tips & Tricks On Finding The Best Deals

How To Prepare For Amazon Prime Day 2021 - 9 Top Tips & Tricks On Finding The Best Deals

Amazon Prime

 

Amazon Prime Day 2021 will begin on 21 June 2021 which means it’s not too far away, so, are you ready for one of the biggest online shopping events, exclusively for Amazon Prime members, to begin? This includes simple things like ensuring your account is up-to-date with your correct details and knowing how to find the best deals quickly so you don’t miss out on bargains. There are other things you can be doing in the lead-up to Prime Day 2021, as well as on the actual shopping day, which we’ve listed, in a bit more detail, below. 

Don’t know what Amazon Prime Membership is? Have a read of this: Our Guide To Amazon Prime

 

1. Get Prime Membership 

Amazon Prime

 

Obviously, you need to be an Amazon Prime Member to be able to access all of the deals on Prime Day and if you sign-up for Prime membership right now, you can use the 30-day free trial which means you can access all of the Prime Day deals without actually parting with any extra cash – result!

 

2. Download The Amazon Shopping App

 

App

The Amazon shopping app is available for both iOS and Android devices which means you can shop on the go and never miss a deal while you’re away from home. With features such as push notifications on specific deals and 1-click ordering, the app makes it really easy to make purchases on Prime Day (as well as throughout the year). 

 

3. Check Billing & Shipping Information

 

Settings

 

It seems obvious but make sure your billing information is correct so you’re not messing around updating delivery addresses etc. on Prime Day. You can also turn on 1-Click ordering if you want to which lets you associate a credit, debit, or AmazonStore Card with addresses you ship to frequently so you can place orders with a single click of a button. 

 

4. Get Deal Notifications & Watch Deals

 

Get Deal Notifications & Watch Deals

 

With your iPhone or Android smartphone, you can select upcoming deals and pop them on a watch list. You’ll then receive notifications as soon as one of your ‘watched deals’ becomes available. This feature is particularly useful for lighting deals that have a specific start time.  

On desktops, you can download the Amazon Assistant so you can get notified when deals that you’re watching go live. Plus, you can create wish lists, shortcuts, track your orders and create product comparisons. 

 

Set A Reminder 

Those with echo devices can ask Alexa to remind them about Prime Day or you could just set a notification in your smartphone’s calendar. 

 

Start Early

Shopping List

If there are particular items you’re interested in buying, add them to your list/basket ahead of Prime Day and you’ll quickly be able to see if they’ve been discounted or not. 

 

5. Look For The Prime Day Badge

Look For The Prime Day Badge

When you search for products over on Amazon during Prime Day, the products included in the Prime Day deals will have a Prime Day badge on them so you can easily see which items will be discounted when you’re browsing through product lists. 

 

 

6. Browse Smartly

Amazon shopping categories

 

If you really want to, you can scroll through hundreds of offers but you’re better off browsing by interest (we’re guessing ‘photography’ might be a popular one with you guys) or use the category filters to drill down to the products you actually want to see/buy. 

 

7. Get Others looking For Deals

 

Share Prime benefits

A perk of Prime membership is that you can share some benefits of it within your household and this includes access to Prime Day shopping. A household is considered to be ‘up to two adults and four children.’ 

 

8. Other Ways To Shop Prime Day

Shop with Alexa: Prime members can discover deals by asking “Alexa, what are my Prime Day deals?”

Amazon Hub: Free for Prime members, customers also have the alternative, convenient option to pick up and return their Amazon packages through Amazon Hub a contactless, click and collect service.

 

9. Sign-Up To ePz’s Newsletter & Visit Us On Prime Day

ePHOTOzine will be covering the whole of the shopping event, bringing you the best deals in photography, smartphones and photography accessories so you don’t have to go hunting for the deals. 

Look out for our ‘Amazon Prime Day 2021’ news that will have up-to-date offers and discounts, plus we’ll be using our social media channels to bring you the best deals as soon as we find them. You’ll also want to make sure you’re signed up for our newsletters so you can get all of the best photography deals delivered to your inbox. 

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Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
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It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Christmas Prize Draw Day 9 – Win InPixio Photo Editing Software! Eclipse HDR Pro & Photo Ultimate up for grabs!

Christmas Prize Draw Day 9 - Win InPixio Photo Editing Software! Eclipse HDR Pro & Photo Ultimate up for grabs!

Enter today’s Christmas Prize Draw for the chance to win 1 of 2 copies of InPixio Eclipse HDR Pro or 1 of 2 copies of InPixio Photo Studio 10 Ultimate!

| 
Competitions

Christmas Prize Draw

InPixio Photo Studio 10 Ultimate & Eclipse HDR Pro

 

Enter today’s Christmas Prize Draw for the chance to win either Photo Studio Ultimate 10 or Eclipse HDR Pro from Inpixio! We have two copies of each up for grabs! 

 

Photo Studio 10 Ultimate

Photo Studio 10 Ultimate delivers professional photo editing & photo organizing features, spectacular special effects and professional-quality photo projects – all together in one powerful editing suite.

Photo Studio 10 Ultimate makes it easier than ever to unlock the power of your digital camera.

Crop, straighten and fix colour, brightness and redeye imperfections in one click. This is photo editing software made easy! Smooth skin, remove dark circles, brighten teeth & more. Enhance, restore and repair old pictures. Plus many, many more features.

 

Eclipse HDR Pro

Eclipse HDR Pro puts you back in control of your photos. There has never been a faster or easier way to create professional HDR images.

With full control over lighting and exposure, you can achieve a new level of creativity with your RAW and HDR projects. Easily re-expose your images without compromising on detail and colour. Eclipse HDR provides full resolution tone mapping in real-time. No halo, no colour shift, just balanced and natural-looking HDR images

This easy-to-use software is perfect for enhancing all kinds of photographs including landscape, interior, panorama, architecture and real estate to name just a few.

 

Find out more about InPixio software 

 

Christmas 2020 Prize Draw Calendar

InPixio Photo Studio 10 Ultimate & Eclipse HDR Pro

Win Photo Studio Ultimate 10 or Eclipse HDR Pro

Photo Studio 10 Ultimate makes it easier than ever to unlock the power of your digital camera, while Eclipse HDR Pro puts you back in control of your photos – there has never been a faster or easier way to create professional HDR images.

Find out more about InPixio software

 

Enter below to be in with a chance of winning Photo Studio Ultimate 10 or Eclipse HDR Pro from InPixio!

P.S. a huge ‘thank you’ to all of our members for being part of our amazing community and to those clients who have supported us through these unprecedented circumstances. It’s been a tough year, so ‘thanks’ – we couldn’t have made it through 2020 without you! 

Wishing you all a lovely Christmas and here’s hoping 2021 will be healthy and happy all round. 

The ePHOTOzine Team.

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9 Bad Weather Photography Tips

9 Bad Weather Photography Tips

Landscape

Photo by David Pritchard

 

 

1. ‘There’s No Such Thing As Bad Weather’

Top landscape photographer John Gravett once said: “There is no such thing as bad weather – only different types of lighting,” and he couldn’t be more correct. Just because the light’s dull doesn’t mean you still can’t capture good shots, you just have to think a bit differently. The same goes for rain which, in fact, can help you capture cracking landscapes. Try to not leave the door with the mindset that you’ll be battling bad weather instead, think how you can use it to your advantage. 

 

2. Dress For The Weather

Staying dry will keep you in a more positive frame of mind so make sure you have waterproof clothing protecting you from head-to-toe. Without it, you’ll just get soaked when it’s raining which will just make you miserable and taking photos will probably not be at the top of your list. A coat with a hood, waterproof trousers and a good pair of boots should keep you dry. A decent pair of socks and layers will keep you warm but it’s down to personal choice if you wear a pair of gloves or not as fleece gloves will just become sodden and not pleasant to wear. 

 

3. Take The Right Bag

You can buy water- and weatherproof camera bags that’ll keep your gear dry, plus many styles of camera bag now come with a waterproof cover built-in. If you’re using a bag that doesn’t have this feature, it’s really worth spending a few pounds and investing in one. After all, a waterproof cover is cheaper to buy than new equipment! Check out our complete guide to camera bags.

 

4. Protect Your Camera And Lenses

Many companies are now bringing weather-sealed equipment to the market, but it’s always worth adding a waterproof cover just in case. You can purchase rain sleeves which fit over your camera and lens, plus some are made to measure for your specific kit. Some photographers have used plastic bags to protect their gear in the past but obviously, this isn’t the best method and will certainly not work in heavy downpours.

On wet weather days when it’s humid, you can get condensation build-up on the inside of the cover as too can putting damp hands inside the cover to adjust your lens, which means water will be sat against your kit so do pack a cloth you can wipe your kit with if needs be. 

 

5. Take A Tripod Out With You

Lighting levels will be lower on cloudy, rainy days which means exposures will be longer so a tripod is an essential piece of kit. Plus, if you’re using a rain cover, they don’t tend to fit round camera straps very well so using a tripod is your best option. 

 

6. Pack A Lens Cloth

You may want to capture rain-filled images, but this doesn’t mean you want water droplets to sit on your lens. Rain on your lens will spoil your shots so do take the time to dry the lens before hitting the shutter button. If you’re going to be out for a longer period of time you’ll want to pack several lens cloths as you won’t achieve much if you try and dry a lens with an already damp cloth.

 

 

Mountains

Photo by David Pritchard

 

7. Choosing Lenses 

Landscapes aren’t just about wide-angle lenses as telephoto lenses can really help you capture some interesting images. In a previous article, John Gravett said: “Rain is wonderful at creating recession, in landscape pictures. Using a telephoto lens to compress perspective along with the recessive nature of the weather can create some truly striking images.”

 

8. Try Working In Black & White 

A shot that looks dull and boring in colour can be transformed into a great moody mono. Plus, you’ll be able to emphasise texture and tones, enhancing the mood and elements in your shots by shooting in black and white

 

9. Foreground Interest

Adding foreground interest to landscape images is something that should always be considered and this becomes even more important when shooting in the rain, as John Gravett explains: “Landscapes can often look moody and impressive when photographed in bad weather. Similarly, they can also look pastel and delicate – particularly when shooting over lakes or bodies of water. I generally try to include some foreground interest or dark element within the picture as a contrast to the overall light tones of a drizzly day. Make sure your expose “to the right” – firstly, it will maximise your data, and secondly, it will give you a high key feel rather than a dull, grey overcast look; that alone will make your thumbnails on your computer more appealing….Heavy rain can totally obscure background elements in a landscape, changing the emphasis from the overall landscape to elements in the foreground, which can so often get overlooked.”

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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9 Top Tips For Better Bridge Photography

9 Top Tips For Better Bridge Photography

Most of us use bridges every single day and while it is true that many – big and small, old and new – of them aren’t worth photographing, there are a great many that are extremely photogenic. These are impressive structures that often dominate the area in which they are situated.

 

Bridge

Photo by David Pritchard

1. Safety First

Before you head off to the nearest suspension bridge with your camera bag, it is worth saying that you should take care and be considerate in your pursuit of bridge images. Park only where you are allowed, stick to recognised pedestrian areas and do not endanger yourself or anyone else – that includes tripping fellow visitors with your tripod.
 

2. Lens Choices 

Anything goes in respect of lens options. Wide-angles can give dramatic lines and obviously work best if you can walk onto the bridge itself so you can wander around looking for bold foreground details. Set a small lens aperture for an extensive depth-of-field to make the most of scenes. Wides are obviously great too, to put a bridge into context with its surroundings if you can’t get back far enough. If you find using a wide-angle lens gives you a shot with too much sky and land in it try shooting in a panoramic format. 

 

Bridge panorama

Photo by David Pritchard

If you want to compress perspective, it is time to fit a telephoto lens. Long lenses are handy too for isolating structure details and the like. Longer lenses give a stronger flattening effect and it can look great when there are lots of lines to compress.
 

3. Think Accessories 

A polariser is worth considering, particularly on sunny days when it can enrich blue skies as well as eliminate glare for saturated colours. Just watch your apertures and shutter speeds.

It is worth having a tripod in the car and although you might not need it for most of the time, it will pay for itself when the lighting levels drop or when you want to use slow shutter speeds to blur traffic.
 

4. When To Go? 

Time of day and lighting are two crucial aspects to consider. Most weather conditions work for bridges although one exception to that is dull, flat, blank sky days. Early morning or late evening are good times when a low sun gives oblique lighting to highlight textures in the scene and the warm lighting adds to the mood. If you make the effort to get there for the evening light you might as well as hang around for twilight and a bit of low light photography. This is where the tripod and remote release are essential. A head torch comes in handy too as the light levels drop away.

 

5. Shoot Detail

As well as overall views of the bridge, do get in close and shoot details too. Nuts and bolts, suspension wires, supports, signs and much more can make for good images. You could even set yourself a mini project and shoot a series of images that sums up the structure. This is a great idea for older structures but works for new bridges too. Look for interesting patterns when working at these close distances which can be turned into graphical, abstract shots.

 

Bridge 

Photo by David Pritchard

 

6. Choose Your Angle

The angle you shoot a bridge at can make it look more powerful. When you see a bridge in the distance consider where else you could go nearer to the bridge or from other angles to get better / different viewpoints. 

 

7. Longer Shutter Speeds

Once daylight has given way to twilight it is time to explore the long shutter speeds of your camera. You could try the B (Bulb) setting where the shutter stays open so long as the shutter button is held down using the remote release. Most advanced cameras have lengthy shutter speed options available, and if you want to shoot longer B is the setting to use, but it is important to make sure your battery has plenty of charge. If the battery fails before the image is finished and saved you will lose it.
 

8. Contrast Can Be A Problem

On a bright day the contrast between the sunlit bridge’s walls and the shadowed arches can be very different. If you take a meter reading from the lit bricks they’ll come out fine but underneath the arches they’ll be no detail as it’ll be black. If you expose for the darker shadow areas the bricks will still be light but they won’t have any detail. To fix this, you can either expose for the highlights (brick) and use flash to fill in the shadow area or bracket the shot.

 

9. Guide The Eye 

You can use bridges as paths that lead the eye through your shot or use colourful lines created by traffic crossing the bridge when captured with slower shutter speeds to guide the eye through the image. You can also use bridge arches as in-picture frames to focus the eye on a particular part of the shot. Just keep an eye on the exposure when doing this to make sure the scene doesn’t appear too dark. 

 

Viaduct : Conisbrough

 

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Amazon US,
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