Posted on Leave a comment

10 Top Lighting Tutorials That Explore Light In All Its Forms

10 Top Lighting Tutorials That Explore Light In All Its Forms

Here are 10 top tutorials where ‘light’ is mentioned somewhere in the title so you have access to top tips on flash, natural light, low light, winter light and everything in between in one handy place.

| 
General Photography

Indoor Portrait

 

If you’re looking for lighting advice, be it for capturing portraits on a sunny day or shooting landscapes in summer, we probably have a tutorial to help you.

 

1. Five Top Tips On How To Control & Work With Natural Light

Natural light is often the only light available to us when we are out shooting. But far from being an untameable beast, there are several ways that you can control it to achieve your desired photo.

 

2. Photographing Low Light Portraits

Working with just one light, or indeed natural light at dusk, is a great way to create moody portraits that can be full of character. It’s a perfect technique for shooting subjects who are a little older as low light can really exaggerate lines and wrinkles but don’t let this put you off photographing low light portraits of younger members of your family.

 

3. Six Top Natural Light Portrait Tips For Beginners

Get back to basics and make the most of natural light by capturing portraits without flash or studio lights.

 

4. Five Top Tips On How To Use Window Light For Indoor Portraits

Daylight is free and it is wonderful for portrait work as not only is it flattering and photogenic but it’s really easy to work with so it’s a good place for beginners to start. You don’t need a fancy studio, either, as you can pick a location outdoors or simply set-up next to a window in your own home.  

 

5. Three Top Tips On Using Fill-In Flash For Portraits

Fill-in flash can give images that extra bit of ‘pop’ they need as we explain in this article.

 

Indoor Portrait

 

6. A Basic Introduction To Outdoor Photography: 4 Top Outdoor Lighting Tips

Light’s an important tool for photographers and knowing how to make it work to your advantage when capturing photographs outdoors is essential.

 

7. How To Use Built-In Camera Flash Successfully

Flash can give images that extra bit of ‘pop’ they need and many cameras feature several flash modes for you to pick from so we’re going to talk through the various modes available and how they work. 

 

8. Top Portrait Photography Tips That Use Just One Light

With just 1 studio light, the COOPH team demonstrate how you can create different/unique portraits by manipulating how the light falls to enhance portraits and, as a result, greatly improve your overall results. 

 

9. Three Top Tips On Controlling And Using Flare In Your Photos

If you’ve ever taken photographs with the sun in front of you, you’re likely to have experience flare, which probably spoilt your photograph. However, there are several things you can do to remove it or if you’re feeling creative, you can use it in your shots to add a little romanticism, mystery and warmth to your work.

 

10. Nine Portrait Photography Light Hacks In 90 Seconds

We’ve got 9 lighting hacks to share with you which you can use the next time you’re capturing portraits.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition  

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

dudler’s latest blog : goodbye to all that?

dudler's latest blog : art, snap or reportage

Profile

Goodbye to all that?

28 Jul 2021 9:31AM  
Views : 52
Unique : 48

11864_1627461070.jpg

I’m not sure how many blogs I have written since the start of the pandemic, but I suspect at around 400. And looking for signs that normality might be returning, I’m particularly pleased that I shall be writing full-size articles for EPZ again. You can see the first one HERE.

So my output of blogs will be reducing, though as I’ve promised a few people, I will be continuing to write them from time to time. As I’ve said more or less from the start, I welcome ideas that people would like explored in this format. After my initial run through of the photographic alphabet, it’s often been a struggle to find something to write about. But a morning walk has often inspired me.

That’s all for today, but there will be more blogs to come!

11864_1627461091.jpg

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

dudler’s latest blog : it?s all about me

dudler's latest blog : art, snap or reportage

It’s all about me

25 Jul 2021 2:12AM  
Views : 81
Unique : 69

11864_1627175561.jpg

Anyone who writes articles or blogs will realise but it’s all about them. Of course, it’s the same with pictures – every picture we take reflects our own likes and dislikes, our prejudices and preferences.
I keep going back to the late Roger Hicks’ pieces in Amateur Photographer. They reflect his experience as a writer, as a photographer, and as a human being. In that sense, they’re all about him: but he’s always rather in the background. Every one of them is a careful analysis of a single picture and he’s incredibly wide-ranging in the material he draws on.

Often, there’s something about the technical side of the picture, the depth of field or the shutter speed, and how this was essential to the overall effect that the picture creates. Always, the piece is literate and humane: Hicks treats every human being with the same respect, and uses language in the way that would draw the approval of any English teacher. He gives details of the historical context of the picture, of what it might have meant that the time that it was taken and what it means now. He reflects on why the photograph might have been taken and the resources needed to produce it.

There is usually something about the composition of the image, and there’s often a comment about how it fits into the work that the photographer was produced over a period of time. In the article in front of me now, he writes ‘it is recursive: the photographer takes the pictures, and the pictures influence the photographer.’

You can produce a checklist of these things that Roger Hicks seemed to put into every article with the appearance of effortless grace, but writing something in the same way, covering all of these points is far, far harder. The many writers who have filled the last page of Amateur Photographer since Roger Hicks died have generally failed abysmally. One or two of them have come close to the high standard that the set. But many of them seemed to have got lost in a well of their own experience.

Hicks had been a professional write for most of his adult life, and an AP columnist for a good while before the start of the Final Analysis column that excites my admiration so much. His writing is never less than competent, and he and his wife, Frances Schultz, take the credit for numerous photographic books where they were contracted to provide text as part of a publisher’s series of themed volumes. His AP columns were the ultimate product of many years’ accumulation of knowledge and understanding, and they often achieve wisdom, I believe.

The nature of a blog is that it starts from the writer’s experience: and I have no other way to see the world but from where I stand and threw my eyes. That doesn’t mean that I have to become fixated on my own experience or feelings, unless they of the subject of the blog. I hope that by setting out what I see as the extreme professionalism of Roger Hicks’ writing I shall remind myself of what I need to do, and possibly suggest a better way for the terminally self-involved (if they ever read other people’s blogs).

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

4 Top Tips All About Exploring The Urban Jungle

4 Top Tips All About Exploring The Urban Jungle

We have some city photography advice to share with you today that will ensure you’re armed with all of the advice you need for a successful shoot in your local town.

| 
Architecture

Sheffield

 

For many of us, when we decide to get out and about with our cameras we automatically turn to the countryside. But with the majority of the population living within easy reach of a major Town or City, is that really the right decision? It’s great fun just walking around a city taking shots of literally everything but if you want to capture great images you need to go with a plan and a bag of kit including a couple of lenses and a tripod.

 

1. Think About Your Equipment

Building

 

Don’t take lots of equipment just in case you might miss a shot, rather modify your subject matter and shooting style to suit the kit you have with you. This minimalist approach to shooting can help improve your success ratio.

2. Don’t Get Overwhelmed 

London

 

Cities have so much variety to offer the photographer that it’s easy to become overwhelmed with the choice. My favoured approach is to pick one or possibly two themes and then explore an area looking to fulfil this self-imposed brief. 

 

3. Stay Safe

London

 

Where possible I like to shoot with a second person, especially if going out of the main shopping areas. Camera equipment is expensive and pulling out a new DSLR with a huge lens makes you stand out. Whilst I often like to carry my gear in a backpack I will also use a shoulder bag which I always ensure has my head through the strap as well as my shoulder. This makes it easily accessible and less of a target for potential thieves.

 

4. Theme Choices 

Sheffield

 

Dereliction is a popular choice and you don’t always need to leave the main area. The above shot also demonstrates how buildings reflect the way we live with the covering of posters, which is another possible theme.

There are many old and new iconic buildings and these can produce some great images especially if the light is right. Watch out also for the past icons that have become worn and faded. 

Patterns are another great subject. Cities are literally awash with patterns everywhere you look. For example, a simple set of steps and handrails probably won’t win any prizes but it’s the perfect example of how patterns can be found in the simplest of objects. 

Follow your common sense and you will have a great day and capture some wonderful images.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

You can Save £120 On An Adobe Creative Cloud All App Subscription

You can Save £120 On An Adobe Creative Cloud All App Subscription

For a limited time, Adobe is giving you the opportunity to save £10 per month, £120 a year, on a Creative Cloud subscription which features Photoshop and other photo editing apps.

| 
Adobe Photoshop CC in Offers

You can Save £120 On An Adobe Creative Cloud All App Subscription 1
 

Adobe is running a sale on its popular Creative Cloud (CC) plan where you can get access to the full line-up of creative apps for £39.95 per month – a saving of £120 a year (usually priced at £49.94 per month). 

The subscription includes Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom along with other apps for design, video and web. In fact, there are over 20 apps included for desktop, mobile and iPad but Adobe Elements doesn’t feature – you’ll have to purchase this as a standalone product from online stores such as Amazon where it’s available for just under £40. 

The CC offer ends on 13 July so there are only a few days left to save yourself quite a substantial amount of cash. 

 

 

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

dudler’s latest blog : going all the way

dudler's latest blog : art, snap or reportage

Going all the way

25 Jun 2021 2:08PM  
Views : 43
Unique : 38

11864_1624626436.jpg

Whatever you do, there’s going to be a temptation to REALLY push it. See how fast you can go round the corner, or get up the stairs. Find out who can flonk a dwile furthest, maybe, or fling a wellie. If you’re a musician, turn the volume up to 11 (or, like Paganini, break three of the strings on your violin on purpose, so that you can show off how much you can do with a single string (and your bow).

This can be both good and bad: for a jockey or a racing driver, it may lead to a career-ending risk. For an artist, it may mean another week not paying the rent and eating, because the client didn’t want a picture that far ahead of the curve. The trick is to avoid silly risks, but to explore your capabilities thoroughly…

11864_1624626502.jpg

And it works differently for different technologies. It’s entirely good, for instance, to experiment with the fastest shutter speed on your camera, or the widest aperture (and, come to that, the slowest and the smallest!) With your car, though, it’s worth establishing how fast it goes in the lower gears, once in a while: checking in top gear is not an optimal solution these days, when most cars are capable of a speed of ‘Good afternoon, Sir. Do we know how fast we were going back there? On the whole, they will be wanting to take your licence away for a while for going that fast…’ on a motorway.

I haven’t known how fast any car I’ve owned can go since 1995, and I don’t think I want to try that now: but I have tried every lens I’ve bought at the widest aperture it offers. Fewer, though, at the smallest – but enough of them to know that most lenses are not as sharp at f/22 as wide open!

11864_1624626482.jpg

So I invite you to try your widest aperture, your highest ISO, and possibly the one of the set of cheap close-up lenses that you decided was too awful to consider (these days, they tend to be cheap, cheerful, and in sets of four – +1, +2, +4 and +10 Dioptre). +10 will blow your mind, but may show you things that you can’t see any other way…

Off you go now – even if it’s a wet weekend. High ISO works well indoors. And after your walk on the wild side, you can go back to shooting at f/8 understanding three new reasons why it suits you best.

11864_1624626464.jpg

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : all aboard at astley green!

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Profile

All Aboard at Astley Green!

6 Jun 2021 11:32AM  
Views : 111
Unique : 98

After many delays and a lot of hard work the small passenger train at Astley Green Colliery Museum, now Lancashire Mining Museum, is now up and running. So yesterday Sue and I went to see if there were any tickets available. It is now running on a first come first served basis, so no pre-booking necessary, and we secured two tickets at £3.00 each for 2.45pm. The trains are running again today, today being 6th June 2021, so if you get a chance do have a go. It’s not a long ride, but it’s a good bit of fun and the kids will love it, even us grown up kids. We had a ex-British Rail expert on hand who entertained those waiting for the driver to arrive and being ex-British Rail he was well rehearsed with the excuses for the delay….or was he having fun with us? It works well anyway and soon our driver came along and squeezed himself into his seat, first taking the engine to turn it round and then off we went.

One pleasant ride through what was colliery land but is now countrified with grasses and trees, another change of end for the engine, and then back to Astley Green. That was worth £3.00 and very enjoyable as a ride as well as being happy to support all the hard work that had been done at Astley Green to bring it all this far. The site was buzzing with visitors, something not seen for a very long time.

22471_1622975329.jpg

22471_1622975341.jpg

22471_1622975351.jpg

22471_1622975360.jpg

22471_1622975369.jpg

22471_1622975378.jpg

22471_1622975387.jpg

22471_1622975396.jpg

22471_1622975404.jpg

22471_1622975412.jpg

22471_1622975421.jpg

22471_1622975430.jpg

22471_1622975438.jpg

22471_1622975446.jpg

22471_1622975454.jpg

22471_1622975462.jpg

For these shots I used the Pentax MX-1 compact.

There are no comments here! Be the first!

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Exclusive Regatta Offer: Save 17% On All Regatta Jackets

Exclusive Regatta Offer: Save 17% On All Regatta Jackets

Whether you need a waterproof coat for a visit to the coast or something a bit more insulated for those longer hikes, you can be outdoor ready for less this week with 17% off Regatta Jackets.

| 
Offers

Regatta Jacket

We’ve teamed up with outdoor clothing specialist Regatta to give those who need a new coat or jacket the chance to save 17% all this week.

This offer applies to all jackets and a wide variety of jackets are available for Men, Women and Children with prices (before discount) starting as little as £13.15 for a Men’s Stormbreak Lightweight Waterproof Hooded Jacket. For those looking for something with a bit more protection from the rain, there’s the Birchdale Waterproof Jacket priced at £59.95 before the discount is applied. 

To save 17% on your new jacket, use our exclusive code: JACKETS17 at the checkout before the end of 24 May 2021. 

Save 17% With Regatta*

 

*It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these affiliate links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

dudler’s latest blog : learning all over again

dudler's latest blog : art, snap or reportage

Learning all over again

2 May 2021 11:41AM  
Views : 53
Unique : 47

11864_1619952065.jpg

I’ve had my new reading glasses – my first pair ever – for a few days, and I am finding them interesting, as they say in China. As in ‘may you live in interesting times!’

I’ve realised that while I know my way around the keyboard on my computer, I tend to look down at it a lot. This is disorientating with glasses on, so I am going to have to learn to type without looking down. In general, I’m sort of OK with this, but my wayward habits are very much on display!

11864_1619951940.jpg

I know where the keys are, and have a good idea of the relationship between them, so that I have typed this sentence without looking down. However, I have realised why experienced touch typists, like my sister, always use the same finger for the same key! (That’s one of my bad habits: although I use all my fingers, some of them have been interchangeable!)

But it’s magical watching the text appear without looking at the keys. And it made me think on, as they say. I do better than this with my car and my camera, and usually with the TV remote… I seem to be going slower than usual, but with no more typing mistakes.

Typists come in several varieties. My favourite is the type (see what I did there?) who looks around the keyboard for the second T in letter. Basic fail.

11864_1619951954.jpg

I quite quickly graduated to the next level, of confidently moving my left index finger around the keyboard, and then two index fingers. Around this time, PCs happened, and started to get into the office. About that time, too, a sensible government would have added touch typing to the basic skills taught in every primary school. Didn’t happen here: I wonder if any country got it right?

Things lingered on until around 1990, when the move to having computers in every office got to Coventry City Council, and it was realised that it wasn’t entirely a rubbish idea to let auditors (and everyone else) type letters and memos as well as spreadsheets. The typists were unhappy, but managements everywhere realised that this would unblock logjams when everyone wanted things typing at the same time.

11864_1619951975.jpg

And while this war was raging all over the world of work, my pragmatic boss and I went another way. He’d learned to type young, being a thorough sort of person. (He actually put the monitor on a cupboard beside his desk, and typed without looking at it or the keyboard. That’s an admirable level of competence and confidence: he looked at the source material and notes he was working from.) I hadn’t, so was interested in getting a little better. Some wonderful person in Training and HR lent me a disc called ‘Two Fingers to Touch Typing’ – and for me it succeeded, more or less, where my sister’s formal typist course book failed.

TFTTT was experiential, and didn’t rely on repetitive exercises. It accepted that users would already be typing, badly, with a couple of digits, and weaned us off the habit, a finger at a time. The exercises were fun and amusing so that they didn’t involve massive boredom, and were short, so they could be fitted into a spare half hour in the working day. However, I never learnt to not look at the keys, in the succeeding 30 years.

‘And what has that got to do with me?’ I hear you ask. Well… If you look down to check which pedal to push to slow the car down, you may want to pause for thought. More to the point for a blog on Ephotozine, you may want to be sure that you know which ring operates the zoom, and where the second control wheel on your camera is. And for pity’s sake, put that touch screen away! That really IS the same thing as looking at the keyboard.

11864_1619951992.jpg

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : all weather shooting with pentax

johnriley1uk's latest blog : cool activities on the streets of manchester

All Weather Shooting with Pentax

28 Oct 2020 4:48PM  
Views : 130
Unique : 105

Today it’s the turn of Pentax, and a look at the newest 50mm lens, the high-end HD Pentax-D FA 50mm f/1.4 SDM AW, the AW standing for All Weather, a step up from WR or plain old Weather Resistant. Well I needed it, that’s for sure. I’ve always said that water/dust resistance opened up all sorts of possibilities and this was the chance to literally put my own kit to the test as I coupled the lens up with my own K-1 body and ventured out into a very wet and blustery day at Pickering.

We were having an ADAPS trip out to the 1940s weekend, but we were already on holiday and had a cottage in Pickering for the week, so we met up with everyone there. In the rain. And the rain and the rain. It reminded me of a similarly wet trip with ADAPS to Whitby one April a few years ago. So it was put to the test for sure, and the new 50mm lens proved to be a beauty, and so it should be for the price. It also proved its All Weather credentials, and these days I can’t really imagine buying a new lens that doesn’t have that feature. Of course, if we didn’t venture out in the rain then it wouldn’t matter, but as we do it gets to be rather more essential.

So here’s some pictures, plus a few from a drier shoot a bit closer to home.

22471_1603903524.jpg

22471_1603903540.jpg

22471_1603903558.jpg

22471_1603903572.jpg

22471_1603903584.jpg

22471_1603903599.jpg

22471_1603903616.jpg

22471_1603903628.jpg

22471_1603903641.jpg

22471_1603903660.jpg

22471_1603903672.jpg

22471_1603903682.jpg

Source link