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What are the best bridge cameras?

What are the best bridge cameras?

If you’ve never heard of bridge cameras, it may be because they’re often called by different names. Superzooms is one common alternative term, or ultra-zoom, while these clever cameras are even referred to as ‘all-in-ones’ too. The general classification is that the camera is fitted with one fixed lens that covers a focal length from wide-angle to 400mm, although as you’ll see, some bridge cameras in our round-up offer much, much longer focal lengths.

This means photographers can switch from capturing wide-angle landscapes, to mid-telephoto portraits, to long lens wildlife and travel imagery with just the twist of the lens barrel. Such versatility makes bridge cameras popular with those who travel as they don’t have to pack a bag full of lenses, but the cameras are also popular with wildlife photographers, especially birders who really need those longer focal lengths.

Of course, there are compromises with bridge cameras that don’t exist with DSLRs such as burst rates and focusing speeds and this previously caused a lot of people to overlook bridge cameras. However, technology has caught up rapidly and now bridge cameras can be fast, reliable and versatile, which is why we’ve rounded up the best options you can buy to help you make an informed buying decision…

Best Nikon Ultra Zoom: Nikon Coolpix P950

Nikon Coolpix P950 – 83x zoom

Price: £799

Launched in January 2020, the P950 is built around a 16-megapixel sensor and boasts an 83x optical zoom magnification, giving an huge equivalent focal length of 24-2000mm – yep, you did read that correctly – from the fixed lens that features a variable maximum aperture of f/2.8-6.5. This huge focal length is obviously the headline feature but there’s a lot more to this camera, too.

The P950 benefits from Optical Vibration Reduction to help keep shots steady – especially at longer focal lengths and those shooting stills will be pleased to hear you can capture RAWs as well as JPEGs, affording more potential when editing the files in software such as Lightroom.

Nikon Coolpix P950 Vari-angle Screen

Scenes can be lined up using the 3.2-inch LCD, which benefits from a vari-angle design and the P950 is fairly speedy, offering a maximum burst rate of 7 frames per second. What’s more, those wanting to capture film as well as stills will be pleased to hear the P950 records videos in ultra high-quality 4K.

What we like:
Huge focal length
Vari-angle LCD
Fast burst rate

Best Sony Ultra-Zoom: Sony RX10 IV

Fastest Shooting: Sony Cybershot RX10 IV

Price: £1599

Although it sits at the higher end of the price scale, the RX10 IV is the perfect example of how new technology can supercharge a bridge camera. At the heart of the RX10 IV is a 1.0-type sensor that delivers an impressive 20-megapixels of resolution, and upto 24fps continuous shooting. This is a high figure for a bridge camera and will allow photographers to not only make big prints of their images, but also crop into frames without overly compromising image quality.

A 25x optical zoom results in an equivalent focal length of 24-600mm – more than enough to prove effective in the bird hide although not as long as Nikon’s P950. That said, the fixed lens is fairly fast, with a variable aperture of f/2.8 at the wide end and f/4 at the long end.

Sony Cyber-shot RX10 IV RearAn advanced autofocus system enables the camera to lock onto subjects in just 0.03 seconds but the RX10 IV’s most impressive feature is perhaps the video specifications – not only can the camera capture footage at 4K quality, but the Sony also offers a feature that shoots footage at 1000fps in short bursts to capture ultra slow-motion sequences.

What we like:
High resolution
Impressive video functions
Fast lens

Longest Canon Zoom: Canon Powershot SX70HS

Widest lens: Canon Powershot SX70 HS

Price: £549

If you’re on the lookout for a bridge camera that gives maximum bang for your buck, the Canon SX70 HS should definitely be on your shortlist. This sub-£500 camera offers a huge 63x optical zoom, which results in an equivalent focal range of 21-1365mm from the f/3.4-6.5 fixed lens.

With a 20-megapixel sensor and Canon’s powerful DIGIC 8 processor, the SX70 HS is an impressive all-rounder and also features an ISO range of 100-3200 along with a fast burst rate of 10 frames per second (5.7fps with continuous AF).Longest Canon Zoom: Canon Powershot SX70HS

What’s more, the SX70 HS is also a lot more portable than other bridge cameras, tipping the scales at just 608g and the design and shape of the SX70 HS is a lot more like a typical DSLR. Photographers can line up compositions using the 3-inch vari-angle LCD, which also comes in useful when capturing 4K video and users can quickly transfer content to smart devices thanks to the built-in Wi-Fi.

What we like:
Value-for-money price-tag
High resolution
Lightweight dimension


Panasonic Lumix FZ1000 IIBest Panasonic: Panasonic Lumix FZ1000 II

Price: £750

Although a little older than other cameras in this round-up (the FZ1000 II was launched back in early 2019), this interesting bridge camera still has a lot to offer. The 1-inch MOS Sensor delivers 20-megapixels of resolution while a 16x optical zoom offers an equivalent focal length of 25-400mm, which is at the lower end of what you would expect from a bridge camera’s focal length but is still enough to help capture wildlife imagery without the need to get up close to subjects.

Panasonic Lumix FZ1000 II Rear

As you’d expect from Panasonic who have a rich pedigree in stabilising technology, the FZ1000 II benefits from a 5-axis In Body Image Stabilisation (IBIS) system that helps keep shots sharp, particularly at longer focal lengths where shake can be more prevalent.

Image can be lined up via the 3-inch touch-sensitive vari-angle LCD or by using the Electronic Viewfinder (EVF), which features a 2360k dot resolution. With 4K video specifications, the FZ1000 II is also fairly lightweight and portable, tipping the scales at only 810g.

What we like:
Advanced stabilisation
Vari-angle LCD
Lightweight

Longest optical zoom: Nikon Coolpix P1000

Longest zoom: Nikon Coolpix P1000

Price: £899

The P1000 can rightly hold claim to the ‘king of focal lengths’ title as this impressive camera offers an incredible 125x optical zoom that delivers an equivalent focal length of 24-3000mm – that is a remarkable feat and also opens up new creative possibilities as the P1000 can be used to excellent effect when capturing astrophotography, along with wildlife imagery, travel photography and pretty much everything in between.

Granted, the 16-megapixel sensor isn’t as high as other cameras in this round up, but this is a camera for somebody who prefers focal length over resolution. The P1000 benefits from a big 3.2-inch LCD that employs a vari-angle design to aid low/high compositions and there’s also an Electronic Viewfinder (EVF) with 2,360k-dot resolution.

Nikon Coolpix P1000 Rear

Vibration Reduction to help keep shots steady while movies can be captured in 4K quality. Stills can be captured in RAW and JPEG format and with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, content can be quickly transferred to smart devices such as phones or tablets.

What we like:
Incredible focal length
Big LCD
Bluetooth

Classy Bridge Camera: Leica V-Lux 5

Best Leica Ultra-Zoom: Leica V-Lux 5

Price: £1000

Be honest, did you know Leica made a bridge camera? Well, they do and the V-Lux 5 not only benefits from that classic Leica design, but also offers a 1-inch sensor that delivers 20-megapixels of resolution. The fixed lens serves up a 16x optical zoom which results in an equivalent focal length of 25-400mm with a variable maximum aperture of f/2.8 to f/4.

The advanced autofocus system enables photographers to lock onto subjects in 0.1 seconds and images can be lined up via the 3-inch vari-angle screen or using the Electronic Viewfinder. The V-Lux 5 can be charged on the go, via a USB connection, which will appeal to photographers who are traveling and therefore away from mains power for lengthy periods.

Classy Bridge Camera: Leica V-Lux 5

Other noteworthy features include an impressive maximum burst rate 12 frames per second, which will help wildlife photographers capture split-second moments and the ability to shoot 4K video.

What we like:
2 Year Warranty
High resolution
Fast burst rate

Best Canon with large sensor: Canon Powershot G3x

Canon Powershot G3 X

Price: £780

Some people may be put off by the bulk of a bridge camera, but it doesn’t have to be this way. You’ll notice the Canon G3 X looks more like a compact camera rather than the DSLR shape of cameras like the P1000, but this portable pocket rocket can still offer a versatile focal range of 24-600mm from the variable max F2.8-5.6 aperture 25x optical zoom lens, which will cover everything from wide-angle landscapes to long lens travel photography.

Despite being a little older than other cameras in this round-up, the G3 X (launched back in 2015) still offers an impressive resolution of 20-megapixels, which should be plenty to make big A3 prints from the files. Features include optical image stabilisation, a 3.2-inch tilting touch-sensitive LCD and a built-in ND filter, just in case you want to try your hand at some long exposures.

Best Canon with large sensor: Canon Powershot G3x

While the video specifications top out at Full HD rather than 4K, the G3 X does include ports for both headphones and an external mic so enhanced audio can be captured and monitored and this makes the G3 X a left-field choice for a videographer’s B-camera to capture footage from a great distance.

What we like:
Small size
Decent resolution
Built-in ND filter

Further reading
What are the best mirrorless cameras you can buy
What are the best DSLRs you can buy?

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dudler’s latest blog : black rock cottage and ashness bridge

dudler's latest blog : art, snap or reportage

Black Rock Cottage and Ashness Bridge

9 Aug 2021 11:02AM  
Views : 60
Unique : 53

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I’ve written before about what I call the Ashness Bridge problem. Today, yet another beautiful picture of Black Rock Cottage in Glencoe has reminded me of the difficulty of taking new and creative images of famous – or joining notorious – beauty spots. I suppose that the same problem may exist with well known models.

And with one short sentence I had eased the problem of illustrating this blog, because now I can include studio pictures of models… Although I do feel bound to use at least one or two shots of those well-known beauty spots.

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I suppose the biggest thing is the way that pictures of places like these isolate the beauty, and insulate it from the mundane surroundings. My abiding memory of Ashness Bridge is of a Kensington tractor negotiating the humpback bridge with undue caution, underlining the painfully obvious fact that the driver didn’t understand the width of their vehicle. (I have a firm belief that every owner of a sports utility vehicle should have to drive it once a month on a competitive off-road course involving mud, rocks, and a degree of panel damage.)

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Black Rock Cottage used to be romantically sited in Glencoe, well away from the main road. The construction of a ski lift a little further up the side road that it’s on has taken a bit of the gilt from the gingerbread. I’d actually been looking for the cottage for years on the odd occasions when I drove through Glen Coe, and had always failed to find it because I was looking for a place that didn’t exist anymore, isolated on the floor of the Glen. The very existence of a side turning near it meant that I didn’t see it until 2014.

When I got there, found somewhere to park that didn’t block the road, and set about exploring with my camera, I found that the standard view misses an important feature – the gate across the entrance.
Anyway, here’s the real view from the road, and a couple of portraits of models who are pretty well known in the studio photography world. Have a great week!

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Timelapse Film Shows Journey of a Bridge Traveling Through Rotterdam

Timelapse Film Shows Journey of a Bridge Traveling Through Rotterdam

A team of professional photographers had the rare opportunity to record a timelapse of the Suurhoff Bridge as it sailed through the Rotterdam city center towards its final installation location.

Bas Stoffelsen — owner of The Timewriters — is a professional timelapse photographer from the Netherlands who told PetaPixel that he was asked by the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure to create a timelapse documenting Suurhoff Bridge’s (“Suurhoffbrug”) journey as it took a slow river cruise through the heart of Rotterdam.

The bridge, which is a 656 long tied-arch bridge, headed for its destination near the Dutch city’s busy port area, where, after arriving almost one week later, it was installed alongside an already existing bridge that currently carries traffic to and from the Maasvlakte port area.

To capture the journey, Stoffelsen and his team used self-made “timeboxes,” which are waterproof housings outfitted in this case with Canon EOS Rebel T7 — also known as the EOS 2000D — and a computer with a 4G connection to control the timelapse. For the lens, a wide-angle Sigma 10mm f/2.8 was used to allow them to capture as much of the scene as possible.

The bridge has to turn on a few occasions, so the team used two cameras to ensure that the forward movement was always visible. Overall, each camera shot around 40,000 photos at an interval of three seconds throughout the journey and installation, which is approximately 26 minutes of footage at 25 frames per second.

Because the journey took multiple days and the lighting constantly changed dramatically as a result, Stoffelsen says the team couldn’t shoot in manual, and a lot of post-production work was specifically focused on getting rid of the visible “flicker” that can occur during complex timelapses. The two needed to make sure the film was as smooth as the ride itself.

Timelapse Film Shows Journey of a Bridge Traveling Through Rotterdam 1

To solve the problem of powering the timeboxes — as each uses approximately 15 watts — they relied on a complete battery trailer, which was hoisted aboard the bridge to ensure that there isn’t a moment when the equipment runs out of power.

Most long-term timelapse boxes either rely on wired power (which would be complicated here without the battery trailer) or solar power. Stoffelsen says that any alternative options the team had considered wouldn’t be good enough, especially because the journey was delayed for a week due to bad weather, and the timeboxes were already installed by that time. Furthermore, because the equipment was already installed, the cameras were out of reach because once they went up, no one was allowed to access their location.

The team made sure that everything was set up and checked ahead of the departure, and hoped that nothing went wrong as is often the case with long-term timelapses, but especially so with this mobile situation. Stoffelsen noting that even something as unfortunate as bird waste or anything else that might cover the camera would dramatically affect the viability of the final footage.

Luckily, the footage came out just as they hoped, especially because a project as grand as this does not happen particularly often, Stoffelsen says.

“First off all, a bridge under a bridge… and then, there is the view. Height is key in this story. The higher you can hang your cameras the better the view, and even for the port of Rotterdam, these kinds of transports through the centre-area are rare.”

The Timewriters have had a past timelapse project of a boat sailing through the Dutch waterways featured on PetaPixel earlier in 2021, but for several other timelapse videos filmed by the company, make sure to check out The Timewriters’ website or YouTube channel.

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : a bridge not too far

johnriley1uk's latest blog : cool activities on the streets of manchester

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A Bridge Not Too Far

3 Dec 2020 9:24AM  
Views : 87
Unique : 67

We’ve had a look at various compact cameras, and there’s a lot to be said for travelling light. We walk further and explore more places without a huge camera bag or backpack dragging us down. Of course there are quality and verstility issues, which is why we do it, but for general image making that allows for most subjects to be tackled in one lens, the compact is hard to beat. Unless of course it’s the Bridge Camera. Now we have a little more bulk and weight but more scope than most for long telephoto shots, ultra close-ups and sometimes more control over exposure modes and other features. We started off with bridge cameras, using the excellent Fuji S602 Pro, with its 3MP sensor that pretended to be 6MP, but which sold us on digital image making. Those first bridge cameras cost us over £600 each, a staggering amount really for what they were.

The shelves have no bridge cameras on them now that are actually in use and the last one was the Pentax X90. The DSLR has firmly taken over, in this houehold anyway. But I did have a look at the X90 images and I’ll share those with you now. There is clearly some potential in the do-anything bridge camera, along no doubt with its macro to ultra-telephoto aspirations.

We start off with an early morning visit to the metal bridge over the canal at Worsley.
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Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year

Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year

Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 3

This past weekend, the Royal Meteorological Society unveiled the winners of the fifth annual Weather Photographer of the Year competition, selecting an overall winner, Young Weather Photographer of the Year winner, and a People’s Choice winner from over 7,700 submissions.

The top prize went to photographer Rudolf Sulgan for his 2018 photo of a blizzard on the Brooklyn bridge. The photo shows people struggling against the blowing snow to visit the landmark, but for Sulgan, the shot represents more than a timely press of the shutter.

“I made this image in 2018, during a strong blizzard as El Nino’s periodic warming of water often disrupts normal weather patterns,” says Sulgan. “My main concern and inspiration is that my images hopefully do a small part in combating climate change.”

Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 5
Photo by Rudolf Sulgan | 2020 Weather Photographer of the Year

The title of Young Photographer of the Year, meanwhile, was awarded to 17-year-old Kolesnik Stephanie Sergeevna of Russia. Her photo, titled “Frozen Life,” shows a green leaf frozen in a block of ice—a little summer trapped inside a block of winter.

“The photo is of a leaf stuck in the ice. Figuratively, this is a print of summer on winter. It looks like frozen life. Time seems to have stopped for this leaf,” says Srgeevna. “It’s difficult to take photos in low temperatures and I couldn’t work too long. Another problem was finding the best way to take the photo, and I think I finally found it.”

Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 7
Photo by Kolesnik Stephanie Sergeevna | 2020 Weather Photographer of the Year

Finally, the last of the top prizes was the “Public Favorite.” Once the shortlist of 26 images was revealed, the contest put them all to a vote; 11,275 votes later, photographer Alexey Trofimov from Siberia emerged victorious.

His image, titled “Baikal Treasure,” shows blocks of vibrant blue ice being pushed up out of lake Baikal, the world’s deepest and largest freshwater lake.

“On the first day we arrived at Cape Kotelnikovsky, where I was attracted by ice hummocks and a snow cover,” recalls Trofimov. “It was noon, not really my photo time. But the light that the sun gave, refracting in blocks of ice, caught my attention and made me take this picture.”

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Photo by Alexey Trofimov | 2020 Weather Photographer of the Year

According to the Royal Meteorological Society, the giant blocks of ice are a result of the uneven freezing of the lake.

As the temperature drops through winter, the uneven freezing of the lake results in some blocks being pushed up, which are then sculpted by the wind, sublimation, melting and refreezing. Lake Baikal is renowned for its many ice formations and their turquoise appearance.

Scroll down to see the full shortlist, including runners up in both the Main and Youth competitions, and if you want to learn more about the contest visit the Royal Meteorological Society website where you’ll find an educational “weather caption” to accompany each shot.

Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 11
Tea Hills by Vu Trung Huan
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 13
Surf’s Up by Emma Rose Karsten
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 15
Sa Foradada Storm by Marc Marco Ripoll
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 17
Lavaredo’s Gloria by Alessandro Cantarelli
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 19
Ridgeline Optics by Richard Fox
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Pinnacles of Light by Richard Fox
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 23
Mammatus Outbreak by Boris Jordan
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 25
Halo by Mikhail Kapychka
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 27
Predawn Thunderstorm over El Paso, Texas by Lori Grace Bailey
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 29
Steel Star by Yuriy Stolypin
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 31
Just Walking in the Rain by Adrian Campfield
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 33
Cell with Rainbow by Šime Barešić
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Winter sunset by Ivica Brlić
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 37
El Chaltén by Francisco Javier Negroni Rodriguez
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Under The Rainbow by Joann Randles
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Dam Wet by Andrew McCaren
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 43
Trees & Fog by Preston Stoll
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 45
Small Tornado by Hadi Dehghanpour
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Frosty Bison by Laura Hedien
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Before a Storm by Mikhail Shcheglov
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Monster by Maja Kraljik
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A Thirsty Earth by Abdul Momin
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 55
Final Stand by Tina Wright
Brooklyn Bridge Blizzard Photo Wins Weather Photographer of the Year 57
The Red Terror by Tori Jane Ostberg
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Dream by Sabrina Garofoli

Image credits: All photos credited individually, used courtesy of the 2020 Weather Photographer of the Year Contest.

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A Very Different Take On The Humber Bridge Wins ‘Photo Of The Week’

A Very Different Take On The Humber Bridge Wins 'Photo Of The Week'

A photo of the Humber Bridge with a surrealist twist has been crowned ePHOTOzine’s ‘Photo of the Week’.

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Out of this world By Satiny

‘Out of this world’ By Satiny

 

The impressive Humber Bridge has been given a creative and eye-catching edge in this week’s ‘Photo of the Week’ (POTW). 

Titled, ‘Out of this world‘ the photo is a brilliant example of how shape and form can create something much more interesting than ‘just another bridge photo’. In fact, if you don’t read the image’s description, you could be mistaken that the bridge is some sort of spacecraft hovering over the sea or indeed, as someone else suggested, the great staircase working its way towards heaven through the low-lying clouds that hide the end of the bridge. We love a photo that gets the imagination ticking and this photo certainly does that! Plus, the central positioning, overall framing and point of view just make a really interesting photo that’s further elevated by the post-production techniques applied. 

It’s different, eye-catching and certainly worthy of its ‘POTW’ title. 

All of our POTW winners receive an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter courtesy of Samsung. To be in with a chance of becoming our next POTW winner, simply upload an image to our gallery where you’ll also find all of our past POTW winners.

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9 Top Tips For Better Bridge Photography

9 Top Tips For Better Bridge Photography

Most of us use bridges every single day and while it is true that many – big and small, old and new – of them aren’t worth photographing, there are a great many that are extremely photogenic. These are impressive structures that often dominate the area in which they are situated.

 

Bridge

Photo by David Pritchard

1. Safety First

Before you head off to the nearest suspension bridge with your camera bag, it is worth saying that you should take care and be considerate in your pursuit of bridge images. Park only where you are allowed, stick to recognised pedestrian areas and do not endanger yourself or anyone else – that includes tripping fellow visitors with your tripod.
 

2. Lens Choices 

Anything goes in respect of lens options. Wide-angles can give dramatic lines and obviously work best if you can walk onto the bridge itself so you can wander around looking for bold foreground details. Set a small lens aperture for an extensive depth-of-field to make the most of scenes. Wides are obviously great too, to put a bridge into context with its surroundings if you can’t get back far enough. If you find using a wide-angle lens gives you a shot with too much sky and land in it try shooting in a panoramic format. 

 

Bridge panorama

Photo by David Pritchard

If you want to compress perspective, it is time to fit a telephoto lens. Long lenses are handy too for isolating structure details and the like. Longer lenses give a stronger flattening effect and it can look great when there are lots of lines to compress.
 

3. Think Accessories 

A polariser is worth considering, particularly on sunny days when it can enrich blue skies as well as eliminate glare for saturated colours. Just watch your apertures and shutter speeds.

It is worth having a tripod in the car and although you might not need it for most of the time, it will pay for itself when the lighting levels drop or when you want to use slow shutter speeds to blur traffic.
 

4. When To Go? 

Time of day and lighting are two crucial aspects to consider. Most weather conditions work for bridges although one exception to that is dull, flat, blank sky days. Early morning or late evening are good times when a low sun gives oblique lighting to highlight textures in the scene and the warm lighting adds to the mood. If you make the effort to get there for the evening light you might as well as hang around for twilight and a bit of low light photography. This is where the tripod and remote release are essential. A head torch comes in handy too as the light levels drop away.

 

5. Shoot Detail

As well as overall views of the bridge, do get in close and shoot details too. Nuts and bolts, suspension wires, supports, signs and much more can make for good images. You could even set yourself a mini project and shoot a series of images that sums up the structure. This is a great idea for older structures but works for new bridges too. Look for interesting patterns when working at these close distances which can be turned into graphical, abstract shots.

 

Bridge 

Photo by David Pritchard

 

6. Choose Your Angle

The angle you shoot a bridge at can make it look more powerful. When you see a bridge in the distance consider where else you could go nearer to the bridge or from other angles to get better / different viewpoints. 

 

7. Longer Shutter Speeds

Once daylight has given way to twilight it is time to explore the long shutter speeds of your camera. You could try the B (Bulb) setting where the shutter stays open so long as the shutter button is held down using the remote release. Most advanced cameras have lengthy shutter speed options available, and if you want to shoot longer B is the setting to use, but it is important to make sure your battery has plenty of charge. If the battery fails before the image is finished and saved you will lose it.
 

8. Contrast Can Be A Problem

On a bright day the contrast between the sunlit bridge’s walls and the shadowed arches can be very different. If you take a meter reading from the lit bricks they’ll come out fine but underneath the arches they’ll be no detail as it’ll be black. If you expose for the darker shadow areas the bricks will still be light but they won’t have any detail. To fix this, you can either expose for the highlights (brick) and use flash to fill in the shadow area or bracket the shot.

 

9. Guide The Eye 

You can use bridges as paths that lead the eye through your shot or use colourful lines created by traffic crossing the bridge when captured with slower shutter speeds to guide the eye through the image. You can also use bridge arches as in-picture frames to focus the eye on a particular part of the shot. Just keep an eye on the exposure when doing this to make sure the scene doesn’t appear too dark. 

 

Viaduct : Conisbrough

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Photo Month Forum Competition  

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