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topsyrm’s latest blog : 52 for 2021 week 46 foggy day – haytor quarry

149719_1637487508.jpg

52 for 2021 Week 46 Foggy day – Haytor Quarry

21 Nov 2021 10:01AM  
Views : 54
Unique : 49

This week, once again accompanied by Mrs T, I headed off in rather misty/drizzly conditions to our “Plan B” destination, Haytor Quarry armed with my Fuji GFX 50S.

Main Quarry.

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Just inside the entrance.

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The original plan was to go out to Brat Tor (Widgery Cross) then out to Bleak House back via Arms Tor, however, the weather wasn’t good for such a long walk on open Moor particularly since the purpose of these walks is photography and visibility was very poor. I had packed my Bronica film kit for the long walk but when I looked out in the morning I knew I would need to re-pack more weather resistant kit.

This view from home looking over to the high Moor we can normally see Tors.

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Having re-packed and arrived at the Haytor Visitor Centre the weather was deceptively clear.

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As we set off up to the Quarry entrance I looked back and saw what was following, good decision I thought.

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I took this shot on my X-T2 as we were walking up to the entrance.

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And this one about 30 seconds later……….

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All day the weather came in and out bringing drizzle on the wind which was mostly in our faces/lenses making photography difficult at times.

Anyway we soon arrived at the entrance, the drizzle had passed through again.

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Inside the Quarry there is lots to photograph but again that drizzle kept getting in the way, I would shoot something with the X-T2 as a safety shot then set up the GFX on the tripod for the main shots, often by the time I had the tripod out and GFX mounted the drizzle would hit us again, it was as if it was waiting for the GFX. Also the wind inside the Quarry although less strong didn’t have a main direction it was swirling annoyingly ending up on the lens front filter.

I like to use the GFX’s 65×24 Panoramic aspect ratio with the 23mm lens for these type of shots.

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Sometimes though a little more top and bottom works just as well.

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There’s lots of evidence of the quarrying like this old equipment.

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And the jagged nature of the rock faces (I thought these looked a bit like faces).

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Nature is taking it back though.

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The upper slopes have well established scrub and trees.

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We set off back to the car again the weather was coming in and out, I took this shot just out of the Quarry.

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And this one about a minute or so later, the squall having moved through.

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Once again as we went down to the car the mist was up on Haytor Rocks.

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A couple of minutes later it was gone again, the story of the day really.

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Anyway, that’s all for this week folks, no Ponies or wildlife again, sorry. As always comments welcome.

Tags:
Dartmoor
Landscape and travel
Dartmoor Photowalk
Haytor Quarry

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Remembering controversial photographer F. Holland Day ~ Photography News

Remembering controversial photographer F. Holland Day ~ Photography News

July 8, 2018 /Photography News/ Born 154 years ago, on July 8, 1864, Fred Holland Day was a dedicated aesthete and well-known figure in turn-of-the-century Boston. He was one of the earliest advocates of Pictorial photography in America and, like Alfred Stieglitz (with whom he corresponded until they had a serious disagreement around 1902), he tirelessly wrote articles, mounted exhibitions, and encouraged like-minded photographers who supported the medium’s artistic potential.

'Youth sitting on a stone'', 1907, F. Holland Day. Model is the Italian Nicola Giancola.

Day’s life and works had long been controversial, since his photographic subjects were often nude male youths. Pam Roberts, in F. Holland Day (Waanders Pub, 2001; catalog of a Day exhibition at the Van Gogh Museum) writes: “Day never married and his sexual orientation, whilst it is widely assumed that he was homosexual, because of his interests, his photographic subject matter, his general flamboyant demeanor, was, like much else about him, a very private matter.”

Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book ''Suffering the ideal''.

Day spent much time among poor immigrant children in Boston, tutoring them in reading and mentoring them. One in particular, the 13-year-old Lebanese immigrant Kahlil Gibran, went on to fame as the author of The Prophet.

Kahlil Gibran in Middle Eastern costume with leopard skin and staff, seated, ca. 1898, F. Holland Day. 1 photographic print on 2 mounts: platinum print. Forms part of the Louise Imogen Guiney Collection. Anonymous gift to the Library of Congress, 1934.
Kahlil Gibran in Middle Eastern costume with leopard skin and staff, seated, ca. 1898, F. Holland Day. 1 photographic print on 2 mounts: platinum print. Forms part of the Louise Imogen Guiney Collection. Anonymous gift to the Library of Congress, 1934.

Probably his best-known work is an 1898 series of more than 250 photographs portraying the Passion of Christ, in which he posed as Jesus, training for the role by losing weight and letting his hair and beard grow. What is usually shown from this series is the group known as “The Seven Last Words of Christ,” seven portraits that refer to Jesus’ statements from the time of his crucifixion until his death. In each photograph Mr. Day, in character, assumed what he felt were facial expressions consonant with Jesus’ ordeal.

The Last Seven Words of Christ, 1898, F. Holland Day
The Last Seven Words of Christ, 1898, F. Holland Day
Day often made only a single print from a negative. He used only the platinum process, being unsatisfied with any other, and lost interest in photography when platinum became unobtainable following the Russian Revolution.

F. Holland Day died on November 12, 1933.

Since the 1990s Day’s works have been included in major exhibitions by museum curators, notably in the solo Day retrospective at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in 2000/2001 and similar shows at the Royal Photographic Society in England and the Fuller Museum of Art. Art historians are once again taking an interest in Day, and there are now significant academic texts on Day’s homoerotic portraiture, and its similarities to the work of Walter Pater and Thomas Eakins.

Day’s house at 93 Day Street, Norwood, Massachusetts is now a museum (The F. Holland Day House & Norwood History Museum), and the headquarters of the Norwood Historical Society.

Saint Sebastian, 1906, F. Holland Day
Saint Sebastian, 1906, F. Holland Day

Beauty is Truth, Truth is Beauty, 1898, F. Holland Day
Beauty is Truth, Truth is Beauty, 1898, F. Holland Day

Black man with diadema, ca. 1897, F. Holland Day
Black man with diadema, ca. 1897, F. Holland Day

No title, ca. 1900, F. Holland Day
No title, ca. 1900, F. Holland Day

Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book Suffering the ideal.
Male nude, F. Holland Day. Source: Scan from the book Suffering the ideal.

Tony Costanza in sailor suit, seated, leaning on pillows, 1911, F. Holland Day
Tony Costanza in sailor suit, seated, leaning on pillows, 1911, F. Holland Day

Portrait of Edward Carpenter, the early gay rights activist, F. Holland Day
Portrait of Edward Carpenter, the early gay rights activist, F. Holland Day

Amercian poet and essayist Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920) in Saint Barbara costume with laurel wreath, pearls, book and (pencilled-in) halo, 1893, F. Holland Day
Amercian poet and essayist Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920) in Saint Barbara costume with laurel wreath, pearls, book and (pencilled-in) halo, 1893, F. Holland Day

Woman (Julia Arthur) in Middle Eastern (Salome?) costume, ca. 1895, F. Holland Day
Woman (Julia Arthur) in Middle Eastern (Salome?) costume, ca. 1895, F. Holland Day

 

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fenfotos’s latest blog : autumn colours on a grey day

292240_1636998912.jpg

Autumn Colours on a Grey Day

15 Nov 2021 6:12PM  
Views : 44
Unique : 38

Yet another grey overcast Sunday morning. It is the time of year when it barely seems to get light, and doesn’t inspire one to go out, let alone take photographs. Fishermen used to call conditions like this sprat weather, in the mistaken belief, it was the best time to catch sprats.

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I originally intended that I would write an entry every week. But I have rather missed that target over the last three weeks, partly due to other commitments. But, also, like all the best bad workmen, I will blame my tools. My Olympus is still out for repair (six weeks and counting), so I am left using my Panasonic TZ70. Now the TZ70 is very good in bright conditions, but really struggles in the murky, overcast, grey, low light, which has been the norm for the last couple of weeks.

As an example, my lead image of Lode Mill is definitely not straight out of camera. The SOOC jpg is shown below. It took a lot of work in RawTherapee to produce the image at the top of this entry. This was not a view of the mill that I had noticed before, but now realise, that in spring and summer the poplar trees at the front of the mill would be in leaf and hide the mill from view. As it is, I think the bare branches give the illusion of a building cocooned in the woodland.

292240_1636998946.jpg

One of the features of RawTherapee is that there always more than one way to achieve anything. This can be confusing for someone just starting to use it, particularly, since documentation is not the strongest feature of the application. But, it can be interesting to compare results. For the image at the top of this entry, I used the haze removal function. For the image below, I did not, but tweaked various other adjustments. The difference is small, and by and large the colours look the same, but with haze removal, the trees in front of the mill, and the detail on the white boarding on the mill, stand out more.

292240_1636998975.jpg

Looking through the other photographs I took on Sunday, it is very noticeable that those taken at the longer focal length, like the picture of Lode Mill, are very much duller than those taken at a wide angle. So I will restrict this entry to just three others which were acceptable without any further processing.

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The leaves on the oaks have turned a rather beautiful copper colour which more than rivalled the surrounding beech trees. I did take some shots of the beech, but they suffered from the general dullness that affected the picture of the mill. As this blog is about getting good results out of camera, I have left them out of this entry.

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I think there are some unsung heroes of the autumn. For instance, some bramble leaves turn a lovely deep red. I noticed yesterday, that the reed beds had turned a light copper colour, giving an attractive edge to the ditches. There is almost an infinite ways of framing a shot of massed vegetation like this, and I invariably walk away thinking that I did not get the best one.

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Finally, I found this tree framed by yellow leaves rather attractive.

Tags:
Autumn colours
Lode mill

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Romani Holocaust Remembrance Day (7 powerful photos) ~ Photography News

Romani Holocaust Remembrance Day (7 powerful photos) ~ Photography News

Deportation of Sinti from southwest Germany, May 22, 1940. The Sinti were escorted by foot through the village under police surveillance.
Deportation of Sinti from southwest Germany, May 22, 1940. The Sinti were escorted by foot through the village under police surveillance.
August 2, 2018 /Photography News/ The Romani Holocaust (also known as the Porajmos or the Romani genocide) was the effort during World War II by the government of Nazi Germany and its allies to exterminate the Roma (Gypsy) people of Europe.

Declared “racially inferior” by German authorities in the 1940s, much like the Jews, the Roma were victims of a determined campaign by the Nazis to herd them into ghettos and labor camps, and ultimately to kill them. By the war’s end, the Roma were believed to have lost anywhere between 300,000 and 1,500,000 people across central and western Europe through starvation, disease, mass shootings and gassing. 

In 2011 the Polish Government passed a resolution for the official recognition of the 2nd of August as a day of commemoration of the genocide.

Romani woman with German police officer and Nazi psychologist Dr Robert Ritter
Romani woman with German police officer and Nazi psychologist Dr Robert Ritter
Eva Justin making a caste of the face of a Rom, Racial Hygiene Centre
Eva Justin making a caste of the face of a Rom, Racial Hygiene Centre

Deported Roma children in Transnistria, near Tiraspol
Deported Roma children in Transnistria, near Tiraspol
Romani Holocaust Remembrance Day (7 powerful photos) ~ Photography News 1
A Serbian gendarme serving the Serbian puppet government led by Milan Nedia escorts a group of Roma to their execution, 1941
A Serbian gendarme serving the Serbian puppet government led by Milan Nedia escorts a group of Roma to their execution, 1941
Romani Holocaust Remembrance Day (7 powerful photos) ~ Photography News 2
Roma people were not allowed to participate in the 50th anniversary commemmoration of the liberation of Auschwitz in January 1995, where thousands of Sinti and Roma were murdered in the Holocaust.

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fenfotos’s latest blog : another grey day

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Another Grey Day

17 Oct 2021 6:43PM  
Views : 569
Unique : 436

Today was yet another grey day. Not quite so bad as last week, when the rain set in almost as soon as we set off on the walk, and I got no usable photographs at all. I did do a little better this week.

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I am still without my Olympus. I am told that it may take a month to repair. So, once again, I am using my Panasonic TZ70, which has made today a real getting to know my equipment day.

I am often quite curious as to why designers make the decisions they do, when the logic of the decision is not at all obvious. For instance, the TZ70 has a ‘Dynamic Monochrome’ mode, which I use for this project. If I use this mode, I have no control over when the flash will fire. I fancied trying daylight flash in the gloom, so tried to set the camera so the flash always fired. This would potentially have made some interesting shots with a highly illuminated foreground against a dark background. I would have thought such a shot was dynamic. But I am denied any such control. Why? The same mode also seems to accentuate the contrast. To get a decent monochrome from a lot of the images I took today, I would definitely need to go back to the raw file and do the conversion myself.

On the plus side, the TZ70 has a tiny sensor ( I believe the crop factor is over 5), which gives great depth of field, which is ideal for macro work. My lead image of a teasel head is a fine example of this.

Perhaps, not surprisingly, given the prevailing lighting conditions, all my successful shots today were made keeping the camera very close to the subject.

292240_1634491423.jpg

This next shot is of some late flowering dandelions. It is the kind of situation that interests me – the different shapes and textures in the undergrowth. Here, the nettles contrast nicely with the grass, while the dandelions themselves provide focus. For someone like me, who is interested in natural history, this is a picture of ecology in action, as the three plants fight it out, each having its own strategy for hogging the light, inhibiting other competing plants, and dealing with marauding herbivores. I have thought of making a false colour image, such as NASA images of a distant planet. I haven’t yet tried though.

292240_1634491481.jpg

This image is also all about differing textures. This field was just a mass of hawkweed (I think). Now late in the season, there are just a few flowers left among the grey feathery seed heads.

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When I first set out, I intended to photograph fungi. But it wasn’t until nearly the end of the walk that I found any. I liked this one with a strong contrast in both lightness and texture to the surrounding ivy.

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My final image if of an inkcap toadstool. Taking this picture made me really miss the fully articulated screen of my Olympus. Not being able (or willing) to lie down on the boggy ground, this image was made with quite a lot of guess work. This is also a nice illustration of the depth of field with the TZ70, sharpness extends for inches beyond the fungus.

Overall, I feel this has been my most successful foray yet.

Tags:
Monochrome
Inkcap
Dof depth of field
Teasel Head
TZ70

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topsyrm’s latest blog : 52 for 2021 week 43 a foggy day on dartmoor

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52 for 2021 Week 43 A Foggy day on Dartmoor

31 Oct 2021 10:33AM  
Views : 340
Unique : 210

This week I was alone again, the weather was unfavourable with heavy fog and rain. I decided to re-visit 2 Quarries near Princetown as I thought they would give me shelter from the weather and I would be able to get some detail shots in them. Once up on the Moor I found the fog was wetter than I had thought and the wind was coming from every direction. No matter which direction I pointed my camera I got moisture drops on the front elements. Hey-ho I pressed on.

Foggintor Quarry Main Entrance.

149719_1635674862.jpg

Surprisingly the car park at the start of Foggintor track was full (I hadn’t realised it was School Half Term) but I found space by the old Pump House. I set off down the track feeling fortunate that the majority of my walk today was on tracks otherwise the 50m visibility would make navigation challenging.

149719_1635674891.jpg

I planned to visit Swelltor Quarry first as I have only been there once before so might spend most of the day there but I had to pass Foggintor Quarry en-route. These are the main derelict buildings outside the Quarry entrance.

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As I got deeper into the Moor the fog got thicker, the track I was on went past the Quarry and I had planned to cut off up the hill directly to it but the visibility made that unwise.

149719_1635674986.jpg

I could see the spoil mounds of the quarry through the fog.

149719_1635675006.jpg

I followed the track until it turned back on itself up the now disused access track.

149719_1635675141.jpg

Abandoned along the track were these rather ornate Granite posts, typical of the kind of things these quarries produced in the past.

149719_1635675176.jpg

149719_1635675191.jpg

There were several smaller derelict buildings along the track.

149719_1635675218.jpg

Further along the track was the largest and most recognisable building, probably the Captain’s Quarters.

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I thought this one deserved a bit more exploration.

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There were several mounds of what looked like spoil from the quarrying.

149719_1635675376.jpg

I saw very little “wildlife” but this “Mountain Sheep” seemed to be surveying his patch.

149719_1635675401.jpg

While I was in the thick fog I could hear loud voices in the distance, I couldn’t make out what they were shouting but I thought maybe stock gathering or something.

149719_1635675435.jpg

Then the fog lifted for a moment and I could see what all the noise was about and as if on cue the Huntmaster sounded his horn.
Of course I didn’t have a lens nearly long enough.

149719_1635675471.jpg

There were only these 2 riders so I assume that they were out exercising the Hounds rather than actually following a trail.

149719_1635675533.jpg

I watched them for a while as they went along the old railway track I could just make them out in the distance on the track to the right of the shot, like I said lens too short.

149719_1635675563.jpg

I turned my attentions back to the quarry but the access was such that I needed more visibility to safely get into the inner quarry.

149719_1635675593.jpg

149719_1635675628.jpg

I looked around but it became clear that on my own in these conditions it would be foolish to try to get into the quarry so I headed off back to Foggintor Quarry.

149719_1635675680.jpg

There were many examples of split stone along the way, I had to wonder how much notice the quarries got for closure as they both seemed to have just stopped production and left.

149719_1635675707.jpg

I made my way along the track to the edge of Foggintor Quarry and found a spot to have lunch.

149719_1635675739.jpg

I am much more familiar with this quarry so I was happy to explore, also there were people around so a bit safer all round. I found an entrance I was not familiar with and you could be forgiven for thinking I was back at Swelltor.

149719_1635675772.jpg

There were some soldiers training in and around the quarry so I decided to do a circuit around the top rather than go into the main quarry, these 2 chaps were having lunch, hardly visible in the fog (bottom left quarter of frame).

149719_1635675797.jpg

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These Sheep were looking rather sorry for themselves in the thick fog.

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After my circuit of the tops of the quarry I looked at the ruins that are a feature at the entrance to it.

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149719_1635675912.jpg

149719_1635675931.jpg

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That’s all for this week folks, as always comments welcome.

Tags:
Dartmoor
Landscape and travel
Photowalk
Foggintor and Swelltor Quarries
Foggy day on Dartmoor

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Slideshow: Photos Of The Day For October 2021

Slideshow: Photos Of The Day For October 2021

Did you miss a Photo Of The Day last month? View all of October’s selections in the slideshow below.

Each Photo of The Day is chosen from our Your Work gallery and Contests and is featured on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Visit the galleries to submit your best photos and gain inspiration from the Digital Photo Pro magazine community.

“Sunrise Experience At Borobudur Temple” By Arki_odie

Slideshow: Photos Of The Day For October 2021 3
Next

Originally Published October 27, 2021

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topsyrm’s latest blog : 52 for 2021 week 43 a foggy day on dartmoor

149719_1635674862.jpg

52 for 2021 Week 43 A Foggy day on Dartmoor

31 Oct 2021 10:33AM  
Views : 73
Unique : 66

This week I was alone again, the weather was unfavourable with heavy fog and rain. I decided to re-visit 2 Quarries near Princetown as I thought they would give me shelter from the weather and I would be able to get some detail shots in them. Once up on the Moor I found the fog was wetter than I had thought and the wind was coming from every direction. No matter which direction I pointed my camera I got moisture drops on the front elements. Hey-ho I pressed on.

Foggintor Quarry Main Entrance.

149719_1635674862.jpg

Surprisingly the car park at the start of Foggintor track was full (I hadn’t realised it was School Half Term) but I found space by the old Pump House. I set off down the track feeling fortunate that the majority of my walk today was on tracks otherwise the 50m visibility would make navigation challenging.

149719_1635674891.jpg

I planned to visit Swelltor Quarry first as I have only been there once before so might spend most of the day there but I had to pass Foggintor Quarry en-route. These are the main derelict buildings outside the Quarry entrance.

149719_1635674956.jpg

As I got deeper into the Moor the fog got thicker, the track I was on went past the Quarry and I had planned to cut off up the hill directly to it but the visibility made that unwise.

149719_1635674986.jpg

I could see the spoil mounds of the quarry through the fog.

149719_1635675006.jpg

I followed the track until it turned back on itself up the now disused access track.

149719_1635675141.jpg

Abandoned along the track were these rather ornate Granite posts, typical of the kind of things these quarries produced in the past.

149719_1635675176.jpg

149719_1635675191.jpg

There were several smaller derelict buildings along the track.

149719_1635675218.jpg

Further along the track was the largest and most recognisable building, probably the Captain’s Quarters.

149719_1635675243.jpg

I thought this one deserved a bit more exploration.

149719_1635675296.jpg

149719_1635675313.jpg

149719_1635675333.jpg

149719_1635675351.jpg

There were several mounds of what looked like spoil from the quarrying.

149719_1635675376.jpg

I saw very little “wildlife” but this “Mountain Sheep” seemed to be surveying his patch.

149719_1635675401.jpg

While I was in the thick fog I could hear loud voices in the distance, I couldn’t make out what they were shouting but I thought maybe stock gathering or something.

149719_1635675435.jpg

Then the fog lifted for a moment and I could see what all the noise was about and as if on cue the Huntmaster sounded his horn.
Of course I didn’t have a lens nearly long enough.

149719_1635675471.jpg

There were only these 2 riders so I assume that they were out exercising the Hounds rather than actually following a trail.

149719_1635675533.jpg

I watched them for a while as they went along the old railway track I could just make them out in the distance on the track to the right of the shot, like I said lens too short.

149719_1635675563.jpg

I turned my attentions back to the quarry but the access was such that I needed more visibility to safely get into the inner quarry.

149719_1635675593.jpg

149719_1635675628.jpg

I looked around but it became clear that on my own in these conditions it would be foolish to try to get into the quarry so I headed off back to Foggintor Quarry.

149719_1635675680.jpg

There were many examples of split stone along the way, I had to wonder how much notice the quarries got for closure as they both seemed to have just stopped production and left.

149719_1635675707.jpg

I made my way along the track to the edge of Foggintor Quarry and found a spot to have lunch.

149719_1635675739.jpg

I am much more familiar with this quarry so I was happy to explore, also there were people around so a bit safer all round. I found an entrance I was not familiar with and you could be forgiven for thinking I was back at Swelltor.

149719_1635675772.jpg

There were some soldiers training in and around the quarry so I decided to do a circuit around the top rather than go into the main quarry, these 2 chaps were having lunch, hardly visible in the fog (bottom left quarter of frame).

149719_1635675797.jpg

149719_1635675824.jpg

149719_1635675847.jpg

These Sheep were looking rather sorry for themselves in the thick fog.

149719_1635675869.jpg

After my circuit of the tops of the quarry I looked at the ruins that are a feature at the entrance to it.

149719_1635675895.jpg

149719_1635675912.jpg

149719_1635675931.jpg

149719_1635675942.jpg

That’s all for this week folks, as always comments welcome.

Tags:
Dartmoor
Landscape and travel
Photowalk
Foggintor and Swelltor Quarries
Foggy day on Dartmoor

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fenfotos’s latest blog : another grey day

292240_1634491364.jpg

Another Grey Day

17 Oct 2021 6:43PM  
Views : 263
Unique : 255

Today was yet another grey day. Not quite so bad as last week, when the rain set in almost as soon as we set off on the walk, and I got no usable photographs at all. I did do a little better this week.

292240_1634491364.jpg

I am still without my Olympus. I am told that it may take a month to repair. So, once again, I am using my Panasonic TZ70, which has made today a real getting to know my equipment day.

I am often quite curious as to why designers make the decisions they do, when the logic of the decision is not at all obvious. For instance, the TZ70 has a ‘Dynamic Monochrome’ mode, which I use for this project. If I use this mode, I have no control over when the flash will fire. I fancied trying daylight flash in the gloom, so tried to set the camera so the flash always fired. This would potentially have made some interesting shots with a highly illuminated foreground against a dark background. I would have thought such a shot was dynamic. But I am denied any such control. Why? The same mode also seems to accentuate the contrast. To get a decent monochrome from a lot of the images I took today, I would definitely need to go back to the raw file and do the conversion myself.

On the plus side, the TZ70 has a tiny sensor ( I believe the crop factor is over 5), which gives great depth of field, which is ideal for macro work. My lead image of a teasel head is a fine example of this.

Perhaps, not surprisingly, given the prevailing lighting conditions, all my successful shots today were made keeping the camera very close to the subject.

292240_1634491423.jpg

This next shot is of some late flowering dandelions. It is the kind of situation that interests me – the different shapes and textures in the undergrowth. Here, the nettles contrast nicely with the grass, while the dandelions themselves provide focus. For someone like me, who is interested in natural history, this is a picture of ecology in action, as the three plants fight it out, each having its own strategy for hogging the light, inhibiting other competing plants, and dealing with marauding herbivores. I have thought of making a false colour image, such as NASA images of a distant planet. I haven’t yet tried though.

292240_1634491481.jpg

This image is also all about differing textures. This field was just a mass of hawkweed (I think). Now late in the season, there are just a few flowers left among the grey feathery seed heads.

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When I first set out, I intended to photograph fungi. But it wasn’t until nearly the end of the walk that I found any. I liked this one with a strong contrast in both lightness and texture to the surrounding ivy.

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My final image if of an inkcap toadstool. Taking this picture made me really miss the fully articulated screen of my Olympus. Not being able (or willing) to lie down on the boggy ground, this image was made with quite a lot of guess work. This is also a nice illustration of the depth of field with the TZ70, sharpness extends for inches beyond the fungus.

Overall, I feel this has been my most successful foray yet.

Tags:
Monochrome
Inkcap
Dof depth of field
Teasel Head
TZ70

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fenfotos’s latest blog : a grey day in autumn

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A Grey Day in Autumn

3 Oct 2021 7:17PM  
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Back on home soil, my walk today was around Quy Fen. Right from the start, things did not look promising. It was a dull day, beneath an undifferentiated grey sky. If it were not for this blog, quite frankly, I would have left my camera at home.

I start off with probably the shot of the day of some ivy. The maturing ivy flower heads provide a nice contrast against the dark foliage.

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However, it was a day that tested my self imposed constraints of square, black and white images straight out of camera to breaking point. This picture of umbellifer (?hemlock) seed heads against the grey sky is acceptable, but would definitely be improved with more contrast.

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Much more substantial post processing is required to make the most of this image of an ivy flower head.

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As this version of the same image shows, this is undoubtedly a colour photograph. This version was produced with a minimal conversion from the raw file, and without the use of any local controls.

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In general, I think the lack of colour is going to make it very difficult to produce good straight out of camera images during autumn. Autumn is the season of colour in the countryside – with the woods and hedgerows full of reds, oranges and yellows in the berries and the leaves. Of course, without filters (I don’t have any) or post processing, reds tend to show with the same tonality as the greens, and berries in particular just disappear.

For these maple keys, the monochrome is almost unreadable, whereas the colour version is quite clear.

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I started this blog to test my ability to produce good monochrome images straight out of camera in a square format. In two cases, I have had to resort to colour images to produce an acceptable result. In one of these cases – the maple keys – it would take far more processing of the black and white image than I am capable of, to create a create an acceptable result. I know a bad workman always blames his tools, and maybe, I’m a bad workman. But equally, a SOOC image is only ever going to be as good as the subject in front of the camera. A photograph still has plenty of tools available, but for a black and white image, if there is little or not difference in tonality across the image, then the photograph is always going to be poor without further processing.

One other point of interest is the difference between handling of raw files between cameras. My Olympus E-M5 has unfortunately developed a fault, and I am waiting to find someone to repair it. So I have used my Panasonic TZ70 today. With both cameras set to monochrome, an image ratio of 1:1, and to save both JPG and RAW, both give me a black and white and a colour image. However, the raw file from the Olympus has the native 4:3 aspect ratio, whereas the Panasonic, the raw file has the square ratio of the JPG.

Tags:
Autumn
Grey
Monochrome

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