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Minolta AF 50mm F/1.4 With K & F Concept A To E Mount Manual Adapter Vintage Lens Review

Minolta AF 50mm F/1.4 With K & F Concept A To E Mount Manual Adapter Vintage Lens Review

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4
 

There are so many beautifully made lenses out there, no longer used because they are perhaps manual focus or belong to a camera system that is discontinued or out of favour. Many of them can be used though, either in their native form or via some sort of manual or even fully functional adapter. Here we look at a mint example of the Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4 lens, intended for the Minolta/Sony A mount, but for the purposes of this review used via an adapter on the Sony A7R III  42MP mirrorless body. This loses the AF, but let’s see if the lens remains a viable option and how it handles and performs.

 

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Minolta AF 50mm F/1.4 Handling and Features

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4
 

Before we set off on our tour of the lens, first we need an adapter to use the SLR lens on a Sony mirrorless E mount camera. There is actually such a beast in existence, the Sony LA-EA4 AF adapter, but this is sadly discontinued. Examples could also set us back several hundred pounds on the second-hand market. Instead, the K&F Concept MAF-NEX manual adapter costs £34.99 from Amazon, is well made in metal and does the job, albeit without AF. We also lose the aperture control from the camera, but there is an unmarked aperture ring on the adapter that offers the appropriate apertures without markings. It is just necessary to count them off, but the job can be done. The adapter is well made and does not disgrace itself alongside the beautifully engineered Minolta lens.

On to the lens itself, which is metal and weighs in at just 235g. This version is the original Minolta f/1.4 AF lens that was available from 1985-1990. It can be identified by the red AF on the front ring and the red IR focusing index on the depth of field scale. Starting at the front of the lens, we have the conventional 49mm filter thread and a small pull out lens hood. The hood is a nice gesture, but really only a gesture as it is very fiddly to grip and pull out and so small that its effectiveness will be extremely limited. However, as it’s there it would seem rude not to use it, so it has been dutifully pulled into position every time.

There is a very thin manual focusing ring, not surprising as this is of course an AF lens. It is commendably smooth without being as slack as so many are. An excellent bit of engineering with just the right amount of resistance. Behind this is a clear plastic window that reveals the distance scale, marked clearly in feet (yellow) and metres (white). There is also a depth of field scale provided, including an Infra-Red index mark at the f/4 position. When using IR film the lens would be focused normally and then the focus ring moved to the IR mark to correct the focus point. Lenses of the day were not corrected for IR light, which would focus at a slightly different point to visible light.

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4
 

Focusing is down to the expected 0.45m, or 1.5 feet. The optical construction is again traditional, being 7 elements in 6 groups. The diaphragm consists of 7 straight blades, so no attempt is made to consider bokeh, which was not a term familiar to photographers of the era.

When this lens was in use on the SLR cameras of its day the AF would have been the primary method of focusing, but if necessary it would have been manually focused using optical viewfinders, the best of which would use silver-coated pentaprisms. Less expensive bodies would use aluminium-coated pentaprisms, which would not be as bright. The point of focus would probably vary considerably with the amount of care the photographer used, the acuity of vision and whether or not any dioptre correction lenses were used on the viewfinder. This was before the days of built-in dioptre correction. So focusing was more of an issue at wider apertures in particular than many of us might have thought. Now, using this lens for manually focusing on the Sony A7R III proves an absolute breeze, providing the focusing magnification is used. If not, then accuracy can be poor, but taking the time and hitting the spot is the way to really very sharp and satisfying images.

Nail the focus and the lens is great to use, with a tremendous, quality feel to it that can be translated into fine images as well. Great fun.

 

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Minolta AF 50mm F/1.4 With K & F Concept A To E Mount Manual Adapter Vintage Lens Review

Minolta AF 50mm F/1.4 With K & F Concept A To E Mount Manual Adapter Vintage Lens Review

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4
 

There are so many beautifully made lenses out there, no longer used because they are perhaps manual focus or belong to a camera system that is discontinued or out of favour. Many of them can be used though, either in their native form or via some sort of manual or even fully functional adapter. Here we look at a mint example of the Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4 lens, intended for the Minolta/Sony A mount, but for the purposes of this review used via an adapter on the Sony A7R III  42MP mirrorless body. This loses the AF, but let’s see if the lens remains a viable option and how it handles and performs.

 

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Minolta AF 50mm F/1.4 Handling and Features

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4
 

Before we set off on our tour of the lens, first we need an adapter to use the SLR lens on a Sony mirrorless E mount camera. There is actually such a beast in existence, the Sony LA-EA4 AF adapter, but this is sadly discontinued. Examples could also set us back several hundred pounds on the second-hand market. Instead, the K&F Concept MAF-NEX manual adapter costs £34.99 from Amazon, is well made in metal and does the job, albeit without AF. We also lose the aperture control from the camera, but there is an unmarked aperture ring on the adapter that offers the appropriate apertures without markings. It is just necessary to count them off, but the job can be done. The adapter is well made and does not disgrace itself alongside the beautifully engineered Minolta lens.

On to the lens itself, which is metal and weighs in at just 235g. This version is the original Minolta f/1.4 AF lens that was available from 1985-1990. It can be identified by the red AF on the front ring and the red IR focusing index on the depth of field scale. Starting at the front of the lens, we have the conventional 49mm filter thread and a small pull out lens hood. The hood is a nice gesture, but really only a gesture as it is very fiddly to grip and pull out and so small that its effectiveness will be extremely limited. However, as it’s there it would seem rude not to use it, so it has been dutifully pulled into position every time.

There is a very thin manual focusing ring, not surprising as this is of course an AF lens. It is commendably smooth without being as slack as so many are. An excellent bit of engineering with just the right amount of resistance. Behind this is a clear plastic window that reveals the distance scale, marked clearly in feet (yellow) and metres (white). There is also a depth of field scale provided, including an Infra-Red index mark at the f/4 position. When using IR film the lens would be focused normally and then the focus ring moved to the IR mark to correct the focus point. Lenses of the day were not corrected for IR light, which would focus at a slightly different point to visible light.

Minolta AF 50mm f/1.4
 

Focusing is down to the expected 0.45m, or 1.5 feet. The optical construction is again traditional, being 7 elements in 6 groups. The diaphragm consists of 7 straight blades, so no attempt is made to consider bokeh, which was not a term familiar to photographers of the era.

When this lens was in use on the SLR cameras of its day the AF would have been the primary method of focusing, but if necessary it would have been manually focused using optical viewfinders, the best of which would use silver-coated pentaprisms. Less expensive bodies would use aluminium-coated pentaprisms, which would not be as bright. The point of focus would probably vary considerably with the amount of care the photographer used, the acuity of vision and whether or not any dioptre correction lenses were used on the viewfinder. This was before the days of built-in dioptre correction. So focusing was more of an issue at wider apertures in particular than many of us might have thought. Now, using this lens for manually focusing on the Sony A7R III proves an absolute breeze, providing the focusing magnification is used. If not, then accuracy can be poor, but taking the time and hitting the spot is the way to really very sharp and satisfying images.

Nail the focus and the lens is great to use, with a tremendous, quality feel to it that can be translated into fine images as well. Great fun.

 

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Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E Lens Review

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E Lens Review

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E

Collectors of fine vintage cameras will be well aware of the legendary Voigtlander Bessa II rangefinder of the 1950s, available with several different lenses, but most sought after with the superb APO Lanthar lens. Here we have a modern Voigtlander APO Lanthar 50mm f/2 lens for Sony mirrorless full-frame cameras and, as well as that enticing name that implies quality in itself, we have the declaration “The best performance standard lens in Voigtlander history”. This sounds like a worthy challenge for our review process, so let’s team up this fine looking lens with the 42MP Sony A7R III body and put that statement and the lens to the test. It should be interesting.

 

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Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E Handling and Features

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E
 

First impressions show us a metal lens construction, very nicely engineered. There is no weather sealing. The Apo Lanthar name refers to an apochromatic design, that is, one that is corrected fully for all three colours red, green and blue, with the intention of eliminating CA or colour fringing. Lanthar traditionally indicated the use of lanthanum glass, although whether or not that is still the case is not known. In any event, we have a compact lens, beautifully finished and weighing in at a very modest 364g. 50mm is of course a standard lens for full-frame Sony mirrorless cameras, but the lens can also be used on crop sensor APS-C models, where the “35mm equivalent” field of view would be around 75mm.

At the very front of the lens, there is a standard 49mm filter thread and a screw-in round metal lens hood is provided. Lens hoods are always a good idea, not only for protection from flare but also for protecting from slight knocks to the front of the lens.

Just behind this is a thin ring with small raised and ribbed areas to assist with grip. If this ring is pushed towards the aperture ring it can be rotated so that the aperture index mark is moved from the white dot to a yellow line. At this position, the aperture is de-clicked, a benefit, particularly for videographers.

The aperture ring itself is quite slim but easy to grip and very well engineered. The click stops, if used, are smooth and operate in steps of one-third of a stop. The direction of travel is the traditional Nikon/Pentax.

 

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E
 

The wide scalloped metal focusing ring is also simple enough to grip and the action is reasonably firm but smooth, the direction of travel following Canon convention. The distance scale is part of this ring and is clearly marked in metres (white) and not quite so clearly marked in feet (red). Finally, there is a small depth of field scale that is extended enough to be useful at smaller apertures. Focusing is of course manual only and goes down to 0.45m, about 1.5 feet. This is exactly what might be expected from a full-frame 50mm lens of traditional design.

The metal lens mount is as well made as the rest of the lens and carries electronic contacts so that EXIF information can be exchanged with the camera body.

Optical construction is 10 elements in 8 groups, including 5 with anomalous partial dispersion glass and 2 aspheric. There are also floating elements in the design, usually aimed at improving the close-up performance.

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E
 

Not everyone can get along with manual focus lenses, and there are plenty of AF alternatives for those who prefer them. Manual focus is something that needs perhaps working on as we have become so used to automation, but slightly putting on the brakes and having a more thoughtful approach can yield benefits of its own. Clearly, with so many MF lenses appearing, manual focusing is nowhere near being a lost art. The Sony A7R III actually makes the process very simple and very accurate, with its quick enlargement of the centre of the image kicking in as soon as the focusing ring is turned. A half-press on the shutter release and we are back to full-frame to recompose and make the exposure. Or, if on a tripod, just to take the shot straight away. Focusing can be done at full aperture and then the clicks counted down to the required setting and the precision of this technique is very high.

In summary, a very fine lens in use and the critical question now is how does it perform?

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
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Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E Lens Review

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E Lens Review

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E

Collectors of fine vintage cameras will be well aware of the legendary Voigtlander Bessa II rangefinder of the 1950s, available with several different lenses, but most sought after with the superb APO Lanthar lens. Here we have a modern Voigtlander APO Lanthar 50mm f/2 lens for Sony mirrorless full-frame cameras and, as well as that enticing name that implies quality in itself, we have the declaration “The best performance standard lens in Voigtlander history”. This sounds like a worthy challenge for our review process, so let’s team up this fine looking lens with the 42MP Sony A7R III body and put that statement and the lens to the test. It should be interesting.

 

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A picture, a moment can change the way we feel. Change how we see ourselves. Change our understanding and change the rules. Provoke and change history.


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MPB puts photo and video kit into more hands, more sustainably. Every month, visual storytellers sell more than 20,000 cameras and lenses to MPB. Choose used and get affordable access to kit that doesn’t cost the earth.

Sell the kit you’re not using to MPB. Trade in for the kit you need to create. Buy used, spend less and get more.

Buy. Sell. Trade. Create.


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Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E Handling and Features

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E
 

First impressions show us a metal lens construction, very nicely engineered. There is no weather sealing. The Apo Lanthar name refers to an apochromatic design, that is, one that is corrected fully for all three colours red, green and blue, with the intention of eliminating CA or colour fringing. Lanthar traditionally indicated the use of lanthanum glass, although whether or not that is still the case is not known. In any event, we have a compact lens, beautifully finished and weighing in at a very modest 364g. 50mm is of course a standard lens for full-frame Sony mirrorless cameras, but the lens can also be used on crop sensor APS-C models, where the “35mm equivalent” field of view would be around 75mm.

At the very front of the lens, there is a standard 49mm filter thread and a screw-in round metal lens hood is provided. Lens hoods are always a good idea, not only for protection from flare but also for protecting from slight knocks to the front of the lens.

Just behind this is a thin ring with small raised and ribbed areas to assist with grip. If this ring is pushed towards the aperture ring it can be rotated so that the aperture index mark is moved from the white dot to a yellow line. At this position, the aperture is de-clicked, a benefit, particularly for videographers.

The aperture ring itself is quite slim but easy to grip and very well engineered. The click stops, if used, are smooth and operate in steps of one-third of a stop. The direction of travel is the traditional Nikon/Pentax.

 

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E
 

The wide scalloped metal focusing ring is also simple enough to grip and the action is reasonably firm but smooth, the direction of travel following Canon convention. The distance scale is part of this ring and is clearly marked in metres (white) and not quite so clearly marked in feet (red). Finally, there is a small depth of field scale that is extended enough to be useful at smaller apertures. Focusing is of course manual only and goes down to 0.45m, about 1.5 feet. This is exactly what might be expected from a full-frame 50mm lens of traditional design.

The metal lens mount is as well made as the rest of the lens and carries electronic contacts so that EXIF information can be exchanged with the camera body.

Optical construction is 10 elements in 8 groups, including 5 with anomalous partial dispersion glass and 2 aspheric. There are also floating elements in the design, usually aimed at improving the close-up performance.

Voigtlander 50mm f/2 APO Lanthar E
 

Not everyone can get along with manual focus lenses, and there are plenty of AF alternatives for those who prefer them. Manual focus is something that needs perhaps working on as we have become so used to automation, but slightly putting on the brakes and having a more thoughtful approach can yield benefits of its own. Clearly, with so many MF lenses appearing, manual focusing is nowhere near being a lost art. The Sony A7R III actually makes the process very simple and very accurate, with its quick enlargement of the centre of the image kicking in as soon as the focusing ring is turned. A half-press on the shutter release and we are back to full-frame to recompose and make the exposure. Or, if on a tripod, just to take the shot straight away. Focusing can be done at full aperture and then the clicks counted down to the required setting and the precision of this technique is very high.

In summary, a very fine lens in use and the critical question now is how does it perform?

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Voigtlander 50mm F/1.2 Nokton E Lens Review

Voigtlander 50mm F/1.2 Nokton E Lens Review

50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

Voigtlander, ZEISS, Leica, Rollei, all fine German names from the top echelon of camera and lens manufacturers and all at the top of their game, in the case of Voigtlander from 1756 to the present day. Voigtlander is now a name owned by Cosina, who have consistently proved that they are more than up to continuing the fine standards that justify its use. We are looking at several Voigtlander lenses currently; having just reviewed the 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X for Fuji X mount we are now turning to the Sony E mount options. For Sony FE full-frame cameras, here is the Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E Aspherical, reviewed using the 42MP Sony A7R III. Let’s see how it handles and performs.

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E Handling and Features

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

This Voigtlander lens is of course a standard lens for the full-frame Sony E fit cameras, but can equally well be used on the crop frame bodies where the “35mm equivalent” field of view would be 75mm. However, in the latter case, the lens would be a bit out of scale and out of balance, dwarfing the crop frame body. Using the full-frame A7R III for this review, we have a heavy, 434g, optic, but one that fits the scale and balances well. There is a supplied round lens hood that screws into the 58mm filter thread. This affords a reasonable degree of protection for the front element.

The aperture ring is at the front of the lens and is equipped with delightfully designed click stops every one-third of a stop. The direction of travel of this ring follows Nikon/Pentax tradition, whereas the focusing ring is reversed and has Canon direction of travel. Back to the aperture ring, it also has a clever extra feature that enables the clicks to be disabled. This will be ideal for videographers, although there are no instructions provided as to how to do this and the only mention that it exists is in the small print on the website, but still with no instructions. Voigtlander paperwork with the lenses seems to follow the minimalistic route, to the extent that it tells us very little. To de-click the aperture ring, push the ring in front of it towards the camera body and rotate this ring until a yellow line is opposite the f/1.2 mark, as opposed to the white dot. This is called the Selective Aperture Control System.

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

The manual focus ring is the only method of focusing, this being a manual focus lens, and it turns smoothly and evenly through its range, from 0.45m. This is the standard near focusing limit for a 50mm lens. Distances are clearly marked in white for metres and not so clearly marked in red for feet. There is a meaningful depth of field scale provided.

The metal lens mount is well-engineered and carries electronic contacts, so EXIF information can be shared with the camera body, providing it is one of the following, which are all compatible electronically: X-H1, X-T4, X-T3, X-T2, X Pro-3, X-S10, X-E4 and X-T30. 

Optical construction is 8 elements in 6 groups, including 2 Aspherical. The aperture comprises 12 blades, a very generous number that bodes well for bokeh. It is not quite the 18 or more blades that vintage brass lenses had, but in a modern context very impressive.

Sadly, there is no weather resistance, but this lens does offer traditional construction and adding WR could well disturb the design ethos.

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

Some photographers find manual focus difficult, and if this is the case this may not be the lens for them, but the Sony cameras do offer various focusing aids and these work effectively and quickly. The biggest difficulty will be with the minuscule depth of field at f/1.2 which means that the merest movement or miss-focus will render the image as softer than it should be. Practice is the key, especially for those of us who have all but forgotten the joys of manual focus. These include the slower working, the easier selection and retention of a particular point of focus and of course the sheer tactile pleasure of a manual focusing ring.

 

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Samyang AF 12mm f/2 E Review

Samyang AF 12mm f/2 E Review

AF 12mm f/2 E

It is good to see that the new lens from Samyang, the AF 12mm f/2 E is proof that the crop sensor APS-C format is still firmly with us and attracting interesting new offerings. 12mm is a definite ultra-wide, having a “35mm equivalent” field of view similar to a full-frame 18mm lens. It is also fast, with a bright f/2 aperture. So with plenty going for it, let’s take a close look, using the 24mp Sony A5100 APS-C camera body.

Samyang AF 12mm f/2 E Handling and Features

Samyang AF 12mm F2 On Sony A5100 Front View
 

The lens is small and light, weighing in at just 213g without caps or hood. It seems well made using high-quality plastics and has a solidly made metal lens mount of high precision. It fits onto the camera body smoothly. The lens is quite fat though compared to the A5100 body and this results in two handling quirks. The first is that the lens/camera does not sit flat on a flat surface and is not stable. It wobbles about, making use of say a tabletop as a lens support impractical. The second is that the lens can foul the tripod and really a spacer might be needed in some cases, or the camera may need to be mounted quite far forwards on the tripod platform. This shouldn’t be an issue with larger APS-C cameras, such as the Sony A6000 series.

There is a provided petal lens hood and this clips nicely into place. Within the bayonet fit for the hood is a standard 62mm filter thread. There is a broad control ring that adjusts manual focus, be it in DMF setting where the focus point can be manually tweaked in AF or in the MF setting. This is an electronic ring and as usual, is utterly smooth in operation. Focusing is down to 0.19m or 0.62 feet, for a maximum magnification of 0.09x.

The lens is weather-sealed, protecting against moisture and raindrops, and a rear protective glass adds to the level of sealing. The Linear STM motor results in fast and virtually silent AF.
Samyang AF 12mm F2 With Hood On Sony A5100

Optical construction is 12 elements in 10 groups, including 1 Hybrid Aspherical, 1 aspherical and 3 ED (Extra Low Dispersion). The diaphragm comprises 7 blades. Flare resistance is enhanced by the use of Samyang’s well-proven UMC multi-layer coating techniques.

12mm in APS-C is definitely ultra-wide and merits some practice with composition to give proper impact to the foreground in particular. In general, getting close and then closer will give the required dramatic effects. Depth of field is less of a problem in the sense that the format ensures more DOF than full-frame for a given aperture. If out-of-focus backgrounds are required that is another matter, but with the f/2 aperture and quite close focusing, it can be achieved.

There is little for the lens itself to do to aid handling, no controls, no input as the camera controls everything. Herein probably lies the weakness as the small A5100 camera body can be quite fiddly to use and controls are easily moved accidentally. Bright daylight also kills the back screen image, so composition can be quite difficult as it is almost impossible to see what is there, however, this will not be a problem with A6000 series cameras. The lens is compatible with In-Body SteadyShot if your camera has it, although that is perhaps not so critical with the 12mm focal length.

Applications for a 12mm lens would include astrophotography, landscape, architecture, and interiors. Portraits are generally too distorted by the close viewpoint to endear the results to the sitters, but as always never say never as some creative portraiture may be highly effective.
Samyang AF 12mm F2 Rear Oblique View

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Samyang Launches AF 12mm f/2 E Wide-Angle Prime Lens For APS-C Mirrorless Cameras

Samyang Launches AF 12mm f/2 E Wide-Angle Prime Lens For APS-C Mirrorless Cameras

Samyang AF 12mm F2 E Front Angle
 

Samyang has introduced the 12mm f/2 E wide-angle prime lens that has been optimised for astrophotography and improving on the existing Samyang manual focus 12mm f/2.

The AF 12mm f/2 E is an autofocus prime lens, specifically designed for APS-C sized sensors and gives APS-C Mirrorless Camera users an angle-of-view equivalent to an 18mm lens on 35mm full-frame format. You can take a look at sample images captured with the Samyang AF 12mm f/2 E below. 

Pricing & Availability: The new Samyang AF 12mm f/2 E lens will be available in the UK and Ireland from early May 2021, with a suggested retail price of £359.99 (including VAT).

Specifications:

  • Aperture Range – f/2-f/22
  • Construction – 12 elements in 10 groups
  • Coating – UMC
  • Min Focus Distance – 0.19m
  • Diaphragm Blades – 7
  • Filter Size – 62.0
  • Mount – Sony E
  • Length – 59.2mm
  • Weight – 213g

 

Samyang AF 12mm f/2 E Other sample images

 

From Samyang: 

Samyang AF 12mm F2 E Side No Hood
 

Korean optical manufacturer Samyang Optics today announced its first autofocus, super-wide-angle prime lens: The AF 12mm F2 E. This new autofocus, prime lens is specially designed for APS-C sized sensors and has an angle-of-view equivalent to an 18mm lens on 35mm full-frame format.

The AF 12mm F2 E offers a bright F2.0 aperture, which enables faster shutter speeds while capturing astrophotography and interior shots. It features 12 elements in 10 groups, with 5 special lenses (1 H-ASP, 1 ASP, and 3 ED). The three Extra-low Dispersion elements and the two Aspherical (H-ASP & ASP) elements have been incorporated into the optical design to minimise chromatic aberration and distortion, in order to deliver pin-sharp images. Additionally, improved Ultra Multi Coating (UMC) has been applied to the lens elements in order to reduce surface reflection and prevent lens flare and ghosting for improved light transmission and more contrast-rich imagery.

‘Capture every moment, day and night’. This compact and lightweight lens has a short minimum focusing distance, weather sealing and a quiet, smooth AF system for stills and video.

Samyang AF 12mm F2 E Mount
 

APS-C Super-Wide-Angle AF Prime Lens, Prefect for Astrophotography

The existing Samyang manual focus 12mm F2 is a benchmark lens that has been loved by astrophotography enthusiasts for years. The new AF 12mm F2 E adopts the Autofocus system and a new modern design that goes beyond the frame of the existing manual focus model; it is even more optimised for astrophotography, adding convenience and functionality.

 

Exceptional Resolution

AF 12mm F2.0 delivers outstanding image quality; you can capture the starry night with stunning clarity and far better than with a smartphone. Incorporating 5 special elements (1 H-ASP, 1 ASP, and 3 ED) plus Ultra Multi-Coating, it achieves exceptional image resolution from the centre to the edges of the frame, even at its F2.0 maximum aperture. With the advanced optical design, Minimum Focusing Distance is just 19cm, so you can easily capture close-ups and indoor images with reduced backlight haze.

 

Bright F2.0 Aperture with Impressive Shallow Depth of Field and Bokeh

The AF 12mm F2 E lens offers a bright F2.0 aperture which guarantees faster shutter speeds in low light conditions and helps improve astrophotography. Furthermore, during the daytime, the F2 aperture adds depth to your wide-angle images by blurring the

background. The subject and background are effectively separated, creating an impressive sense of depth. The large, round bokeh presents calm background blurring and high contrast, to achieve the optimal balance.

Samyang AF 12mm F2 E Top With Hood
 

Fast and Quiet Auto Focus System

Autofocus is now expected to capture images accurately and quickly, but it also needs to be quiet and smooth. Thanks to the newly researched and developed STM (Stepping Motor), a larger focus-lens group can be controlled more quietly and precisely, providing superb image quality in both photo and video use.

 

Compact Size & Lightweight with New Design

Weighing in at just 213g and measuring only 59.2mm in length, this new 12mm strikes the perfect balance of portability and outstanding performance. It is the lightest and smallest AF 12mm lens currently in the market. This lens includes useful new design features such as a durable, all-metal housing, an ergonomically designed grip with a micro pattern rubber ring and a new modern design with a ‘hidden’ red ring. The AF 12mm F2 E features weather-sealing and rear glass protection, to prevent dust, light rain, and snow from penetrating. This allows you to capture stunning images in less than perfect conditions.

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E as in End of a Era

E as in End of a Era


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Yesterday I shot two bunches of white and red roses in one frame; short red in front of white taller roses.

That was the last frame of the last roll of the last production of the Kodak Prof…

E as in End of a Era 2 E as in End of a Era 3 E as in End of a Era 4 E as in End of a Era 5

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