Posted on Leave a comment

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference?

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference?

Let’s compare a basic camera to one of the best cameras out there and more toward the pricey side, let’s be honest. I always heard the best camera is the one you have on you so let’s find out if that is true!

This is more of an artistic comparison than technical. I am not a number guy, I tried to get the best possible Raw file out of each camera by shooting at 100 ISO on a tripod with a two-second timer.

Below are the different shots I got that night where I tried to capture the best photo I could with the camera I was using. Let’s see if you can guess which is which:

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 1

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 2

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 3

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 4

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 5

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 6

Can you tell the difference? Well, the first three photos are taken on a Canon T2i and the last three on a Fujifilm GFX 100s. Let’s compare more closely the Canon versus the Fuji:

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 7

They were both taken with the same 2.5-second shutter, and you can tell that the Fuji has much more information due to the 102 million pixels, even more so when you zoom in at 100%:

Canon T2i Versus Fujifilm GFX 100s: Can You See the Difference? 8

The Fuji would be definitely better in terms of sharpness and definition for printing, but the Canon colors are really not bad and the result is pretty impressive. It still is a great quality photo, especially considering it was captured with a camera that is over a decade old. The main difference that I noticed in this example is that on the Canon the background was a little blurry, while the Fujifilm stays very sharp.

At the end of the day if you want to improve your photography skills I advise you to invest in your competence and knowledge first to learn how to get the best composition, learn when to catch the best light of day, and other techniques that lead to a great photo before you take hardware into consideration. Personally, I love the Fuji because I do big prints for galleries, but it is what you do with the camera that matters most.

I hope this gives you a new viewpoint on gear and that you will explore more creations with the camera you already have!


About the author: Serge Ramelli is a landscape and fine art photographer who has published numerous books on the subject. His fine art photography has been sold in one of the largest gallery networks in the world. Ramelli hosts a YouTube Channel where he teaches photography and editing techniques which you can subscribe to here.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

A Review of the Fujifilm GFX 50S II for Portrait and Wedding Photographers

A Review of the Fujifilm GFX 50S II for Portrait and Wedding Photographers

Fujifilm’s GFX medium format mirrorless cameras have turned industry paradigms on their respective heads, modernizing medium format with newer features normally reserved for smaller cameras and bringing prices into direct competition with the upper levels of full frame bodies. This excellent video review takes a look at the camera for portrait and wedding photography and what you can expect from it. 

Coming to you from Benj Haisch, this awesome video review takes a look at the new Fujifilm GFX 50S II medium format mirrorless camera, specifically for portrait and wedding photography. At $4,000, the GFX 50S II is impressively affordable as far as medium format goes, and with it, you get fantastic dynamic range, high levels of resolution, the coveted medium format look, and Fuji’s highly popular colors. The second version of the GFX 50S brings with it improvements like better autofocus, though if image quality is all that matters to you, remember that the GFX 50S II uses the same sensor as the original GFX 50S, so you can save a bit of money by getting the original model if you do not need the new features and upgrades. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Haisch. 

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Is the Fujifilm GFX 100S the Ultimate Landscape Photography Camera?

Is the Fujifilm GFX 100S the Ultimate Landscape Photography Camera?

Fujifilm’s GFX mirrorless camera series has brought medium format into direct competition with the upper echelons of full frame systems, opening up an entirely new format to many creatives and making it a potentially appealing option for a lot of landscape photographers. This awesome video follows a professional landscape photographer as he uses the camera and also talks you through his thought process for his images. 

Coming to you from Andrew Marr, this neat video shows the experience of shooting with the Fujifilm GFX 100S medium format mirrorless camera. The GFX 100S is easily one of the most interesting cameras available right now. The original GFX 100 was offered a 102-megapixel medium format sensor and a lot of modern capabilities not traditionally found in larger-sensor cameras all at a price that significantly challenged the prevailing paradigm. The GFX 100S continued that trend, keeping almost all of the GFX 100’s features (perhaps most importantly, its sensor) and cutting the price almost in half, bringing it in line with upper-level full frame cameras. Add in top-notch dynamic range and Fuji’s excellent colors, and it looks like the GFX 100S is one of the best options out there for landscape photographers. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Marr. 

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Is the Fujifilm GFX 50S II Enough Reason to Forget Full Frame?

Is the Fujifilm GFX 50S II Enough Reason to Forget Full Frame?

Fujifilm has confirmed on several occasions that it has no intention of producing a full frame camera. What Fujifilm has done instead is produce some of the best APS-C and medium format cameras. The most remarkable thing Fujifilm accomplished was to bring down the overall price of medium format cameras. The GFX 50 series of cameras are the most notable.

The Fujifilm GFX 50S II is the latest medium format camera from the company. Although it continues with the same sensor and retains the contrast-detect autofocus system, the update and price point make it an enticing option. Features such as the in-body image stabilization, pixel shift, and improved autofocus could be enough for some, especially when you consider its price.

At $3,999, the GFX 50S II sits comfortably among several high-end full frame cameras. If image quality is a strict concern, then it’s pretty difficult to find better value for money. 

A recent video from Kai Wong discusses some of the improvements in the new Fujifilm GFX 50S II. The improvements to autofocus seem to stand out the most. Despite it being contrast detect, Wong discusses how it’s much snappier, making it more effective for a wider range of photography. 

Of course, full frame cameras still hold advantages over medium format cameras. However, as Fujifilm continues to develop the sector, it may become more prudent to purchase a medium format system instead of full frame. 

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Fujifilm Is Rumored to Have Discontinued the Brilliant GFX 50R

Fujifilm Is Rumored to Have Discontinued the Brilliant GFX 50R

The camera with a rightful place in the hearts of Fujifilm fans and a cemented place in medium format history has been allegedly discontinued. While it’s understandable given recent announcements, many of us are sad all the same.

I was in Tokyo for Fujikina for the official announcement of the highly anticipated Fujifilm GFX 100. While I’d asked for a pre-production version to take with me on the trip to review, I knew that wasn’t going to be possible. I mentioned to Fuji that I’m typically a Sony shooter and it seems a bit odd to turn up with only Sony equipment. They offered me a loan of the Fujifilm GFX 50R and a couple of lenses, which I gratefully accepted.

When it arrived, a few days before my trip, I opened it and genuinely belly laughed. I put it on the table next to my Sony and took a picture and sent it to my fellow editor here, Alex. I asked him if he’d ever held the 50R before because it was the biggest, heaviest, most uncouth modern camera I’d ever seen. I couldn’t believe it. With a lens on the front, it was a workout. Then I used it. It won me over almost instantly and I loved it so much I ended up buying one the year after. It was generally well-received as an affordable portal to medium format, so why might it have been discontinued?

I believe the primary motivator would have been the announcement of the GFX 50S II. For $500 less than the 50R’s RRP, you are getting a medium format Fujifilm body that is an upgrade in, for all intents and purposes, every conceivable way. Still, a pang of sadness ran through me when I saw this rumor. Not because I have a 50R, but because it’s a camera that reignited a slightly waning love for photography.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Fujifilm Announces GFX 50S II Medium-Format Camera

Fujifilm Announces GFX 50S II Medium-Format Camera

Fujifilm announced the GFX 50S II, a digital medium-format camera costing $3,999 for the body only, or $4,499 in a kit with the GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR lens, at its September X Summit event today. This makes it the cheapest digital medium-format camera ever — it comes in at a full $2,000 less than its predecessor, the GFX 50S, at launch. This is a major step in Fujifilm’s ongoing push to drive the cost of medium-format down and give it more mainstream appeal.

The GFX 50S II isn’t just cheap for a medium-format camera; it’s remarkably light and compact as well, at only 1.98 pounds. Despite its small size, Fuji still managed to pack in a whopping 51.4-megapixel sensor that’s 1.7 times bigger than a full-frame sensor. Fuji has also improved the autofocus compared to the previous generation of the camera (thanks to the new X-Processor 4) and included 5-axis in-body image stabilization (IBIS) that provides 6.5 stops of stabilization.

The overall package represents a medium-format camera that’s far more approachable to the average person than previous devices, which tended to be expensive and niche. The GFX 50S II offers the promise of the benefits of a larger sensor without the drawbacks typically associated with these high-resolution photographic behemoths.

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Sample Image.
Fujifilm

The GFX 50S II seems squarely targeted at more adventurous photographers who operate in rugged conditions. The camera is built of magnesium alloy, is highly weather-sealed to protect it against dust and moisture, and is rated to operate at temperatures as low as -10 degrees Celsius. Coupled with its compact size, light weight, and IBIS, the GFX 50S II is designed to be as capable when used handheld in inclement weather as it is on a tripod in the studio.

The GFX 50S II also features 19 film simulation modes for photographers who prefer the look of film and who want to save time on applying digital filters in post-processing. If editing images in post is more your style, this camera offers an increased dynamic range, as well as reduced noise and resolution, over both its predecessor and cameras with smaller sensors. The GFX 50S II includes Fuji’s Pixel Shift Multi-Shot function, which combines 16 RAW files to create a single 200MP image.

Other features include a range of different bracketing options in addition to traditional exposure bracketing, such as film simulation brackets. Videographers should keep in mind, though, that the GFX50S II only shoots 1920X1080 video up to 29.97p. However, medium-format cameras are generally not meant for shooting video, so this is not a major downside, considering that the GFX 50S II is aimed at stills photographers, many of whom don’t care if a camera has video functionality at all.

The GFX 50S II will be available in late October.

Editors’ Recommendations




Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Hands-On Review With Sample Photos

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Hands-On Review With Sample Photos

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

It’s been 5-years since Fujifilm first introduced the Fujifilm GFX 50S at Photokina 2016 and today, Fujifilm has announced that the popular medium format mirrorless camera system has had an update that modernises the range and also makes it more affordable.

The new Fujifilm GFX 50S II arrived after Fujifilm tasked its designers with the challenge of making a GFX camera that still offers high-quality shooting but at a price that’s accessible to more people. In fact, the designers were asked to make a medium format mirrorless camera, with lens, for under £4000 and with the kit lens combo coming in at £3899, it looks like the team definitely succeeded. For those wanting to spend a little less, you can also pick up the GFX 50S II body-only for £3,499.

We were given the opportunity to get hands-on with the new Fujifilm GFX 50S II as well as the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR to give our first impressions on the new kit line-up and we were also able to capture sample photos, too, so you can see for yourself how the camera and lens performs.  

As well as the Fujifilm GFX 50S II and the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR, Fujifilm has also announced an update to the X-T30 camera (Fujifilm X-T30 II) and two new lenses: Fujifilm XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR and the Fujifilm XF 23mm f/1.4 R LM WR.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Features

GFX 50S Mark II
 

The GFX 50S II features a 51.4MP large-format sensor and uses the X-Processor 4 so the sensor might be older but as it’s coupled with the newer processor, Fujifilm says overall performance is given a boost.

5-axis in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) is built-in offering up to 6.5-stops of vibration reduction which is the highest seen on a camera from the GFX series. We also see improvements in the AF system as the X-Processor 4 and some clever algorithms mean that Face/Eye Detection are more accurate.

There’s a ‘Pixel Shift Multi-Shot’ function that can be used to capture 200MP images and it’s a mode that was first introduced on the GFX100. If you want to learn more about this function, have a read of our GFX 100s review.

19 Film Simulations are built-in including ‘Nostalgic Neg.’ which was launched on the GFX100S and all of the options can be selected from the menu where you’ll find advice on what subjects they’re best used with. You can also check how the image will look with a particular Film Simulation applied in Live View.

There’s no 4K video available but you can capture Full HD video for up to 2-hours.

In total, there are 79 upgraded functions/features available on the GFX 50S II of which are not currently available as a firmware update for the GFX 50S.

As for lens compatibility, the camera uses the GF lens mount, and there are a good number of GF mount lenses from Fujifilm (with some third party support) currently available. The range also continues to grow, too, with the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR been announced alongside the camera and the Fujifilm lens road map showing three new GF lenses arriving between 2022 and 2023. 

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Key Features:

  • 51.4-megapixel sensor
  • X-Processor 4
  • Fujifilm GF lens mount
  • Electronic viewfinder (EVF)
  • 3.2inch screen
  • 19 types of Film Simulation
  • Weather and dust resistant system
  • Top LCD screen
  • Simplified design with PSAM dial 
  • Improved AF
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) 

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Handling

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

The Fujifilm GFX 50S II is aimed at those who enjoy shooting landscapes as well as portrait photography or those with small studios. Fujifilm is also hoping students will consider purchasing the new camera but it’ll be a considerable investment for them with prices above £3000. That said, it is less expensive than the GFX 50S, GFX 50R, GFX100 and GFX100S.

The first thing you’ll notice when you pick up the Fujifilm GFX 50S II is the simpler controls (when compared with the GFX 50S) which Fujifilm are hoping will make the camera feel more familiar to those switching from DSLRs. We actually like the simplified layout with the PSAM control dial doing its job of making the design feel a little more traditional. It also makes the camera easier to use as the controls are straightforward. In fact, the mode dial makes it easy to pick up and start using the camera without having to study a manual (too much), and just start shooting.

In terms of shape and design, it actually looks pretty much identical to the GFX100S but the body is a bit slimmer. In the hand, it feels very ergonomic with a deep grip that gives you the confidence to carry it in just one hand while walking around capturing photos. The rear of the camera also has a raised area for your thumb to hold on to and there’s ample rubber grip on the camera, with a good texture, and plenty of space for your fingers to grip on to. If you want to, you can purchase an optional metal handgrip which could be useful for when teaming the GFX 50S II with longer lenses but with the kit lens, the camera handled well.

Size-wise, it measures 104.2mm by 87.2mm and weighs 900g which makes it a compact medium format camera when compared with the GFX100 but some other medium format mirrorless cameras are lighter/more compact.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

 

As you’d expect from a Fujifilm medium format mirrorless camera, the GFX 50S II is constructed from a magnesium alloy and shouts quality. It’s also weather-sealed so won’t have any problems with the good old British weather.

On top of the GFX 50S II, you find the PSAM control dial that also has 6 different custom modes on the mode dial, so you can set up the camera exactly how you want it for different shooting scenarios, and you’ll also find a Movie / Still switch so you can quickly switch between stills and video recording.

The small top LCD can be illuminated with a small button on the side of the EVF housing. On default settings, it shows you all the expected camera settings, such as ISO, aperture, shutter speed, film mode, battery life and mode, but it can also be changed to show a live histogram, or virtual ISO and Shutter speed dials.

Also on top are a couple of buttons, on/off switch, shutter button and flash hotshoe.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

Turn our attention to the rear of the GFX 50S II and we find a three-way tilting 3.2inch screen that offers good colour reproduction. The viewfinder is the same EVF we’ve seen previously (3.69 million dots and 0.77x magnification) but it’s not removable as it was on the 50S and there’s a large rubber eye-cup to help make the camera more comfortable to use when you hold it up to your eye, and it also helps avoid getting nose prints on the screen as it puts some distance between the camera and your face.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

Other functions on the back include a variety of buttons, a command wheel, a small Q button you can use to access additional settings and a joystick control which is slightly bigger and more tactile. Ports and the dual SD card slot remain the same.

Battery life is rated at 455 frames and it’s a 2200MaH battery. The GFX 50s captured around 400 frames on a full battery so when using the GFX 50S II, you’ll be able to capture a few more shots.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Performance

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

We didn’t have too long with the GFX 50S II but we can safely say that it’s capable of producing exceptional JPEG images straight from the camera. Colour reproduction is excellent and there is plenty of detail in photos. AF performance is generally good, too.

As mentioned, 19 film simulations are available, all producing different effects. The black and white filters are a favourite but all of them open up more creative doors.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Sample Photos

 

Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR

P1010043 | 1/60 sec | f/2.8 | 23.0 mm | ISO 200
 

We paired the Fujifilm GFX 50S II with the new compact and lightweight Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR zoom lens. The lens covers the popular focal length ranges of 28mm-55mm in the 35mm film format and we found it to be a great walkaround lens when shooting handheld with quick and quiet AF. It’s dust- and moisture-resistant and comes equipped with a deep hood to protect the front element from flare. 

You can find more images of the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR zoom lens over in news.  

 

Value For Money

The GFX 50S II is priced at £3499 body only or £3899 with the 35-70mm kit lens. It’s less expensive than the GFX100S and GFX100 and overall, it’s definitely a more affordable medium format mirrorless camera option.

 

Early Verdict

We won’t comment too much on our final thoughts until we’ve put the GFX 50S II through our full review process but so far, we’re impressed with the image quality straight from the camera and also with the price as these two things combined mean that Fujifilm has created a more affordable medium format mirrorless camera that anyone can, literally, pick up and start taking photos with.

We look forward to putting the camera through its paces in a full review very soon.  

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Can the Fujifilm GFX 100S Handle the Demands of Wedding Photographers?

Can the Fujifilm GFX 100S Handle the Demands of Wedding Photographers?

Fujifilm’s GFX series rewrote the rules on medium format, bringing it to the price level of upper-level full frame options and opening an entirely new format to many photographers. The GFX 100S continues that, bringing a top-shelf sensor and capabilities at a price ($5,999) that is about as aggressive as you will see in any camera. As such, it is an intriguing option for wedding photographers. This great video takes a look at the camera and if it can keep up with the demands of the genre. 

Coming to you from John Branch IV Photography, this awesome video takes a look at the Fujifilm GFX 100S medium format mirrorless camera, particularly in the context of wedding photography. The GFX series has rewritten the relationship between medium format and full frame, offering highly impressive image quality while also pairing it with features traditionally reserved for full frame and APS-C cameras, such as more advanced autofocus and faster burst rates. And while you will not be shooting sports with one, those features make the system viable for genres like wedding photography and more, and their prices mean they are not totally unreasonable compared to more traditional options. Check out the video above for the full rundown. 

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Is the Fujifilm GFX 100S the Ultimate Landscape Photography Camera?

Is the Fujifilm GFX 100S the Ultimate Landscape Photography Camera?

The Fujifilm GFX mirrorless camera series has rewritten a lot of industry paradigms, bringing medium format to the market at prices that compete with upper-level full frame options, making it a tempting choice for landscape photographers. This great video follows a professional landscape photographer as he uses the camera in the field and shows you the experience with and image quality from it.

Coming to you from Andrew Marr, this neat video shows the experience of shooting with the Fujifilm GFX 100S medium format mirrorless camera. The GFX 100S is definitely one of the most intriguing cameras on the market right now. The original GFX 100 was mightily impressive, offering a 102-megapixel medium format sensor and modern features normally reserved for cameras with smaller sensors at a price ($9,999) that significantly undercut those of other medium format options. And so, the GFX 100S was all the more impressive, as it offers almost everything the GFX 100 did at only about half the price ($5,999). And beyond that extreme resolution, you get fantastic dynamic range and Fuji’s highly lauded colors, making it seemingly one of the best options out there for landscape photographers. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Marr. 

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

TTArtisan Launches 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens for Fujifilm GFX Mount

TTArtisan Launches 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens for Fujifilm GFX Mount

TTArtisan Launches 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens for Fujifilm GFX Mount 9

TTArtisan has announced that it is bringing its 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens to the Fujifilm GFX mount. Previously available for multiple other mounts, it appears to be the first lens for the GFX that does not need a separate adapter that the company has produced.

The 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens was previously available for Nikon Z, Leica L, Canon RF, Sony E, and Leica M mounts and is now available in native Fujifilm GFX mount. The company’s lenses were compatible with the GFX Mount previously by using its M to GFX mount adapter, but the launch of this fisheye lens marks what appears to be the first time that the company has released a lens that is natively compatible with Fujifilm’s medium format system.

The design of the lens looks as though the company mainly just integrated the mount adapter into the base of the original optic, but photographers who use Fujifilm’s GFX system are unlikely to complain as long as it provides access to the unique perspective without the need for additional parts.

TTArtisan Launches 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens for Fujifilm GFX Mount 10

TTArtisan says that the fisheye design renders an immensely wide angle of view that produces a “visual appeal” that is characterized by “dramatic distortion” and a “creative depiction of space.” The lens is also touted as being ideal for low light photography — such as astrophotography — thanks to its wide f/2.8 aperture (the lens closes down to a maximum of f/16).

TTArtisan Launches 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens for Fujifilm GFX Mount 11
TTArtisan

As was the case with the other versions of the lens, the optics are constructed of 11 elements in 7 groups. Because of the larger sensor size on the GFX, its use on the medium format camera renders images that are distinctly fisheye in nature as opposed to its performance on full-frame cameras.

One major change to the lens in comparison to the other full-frame mounts is that TTArtisan removed the built-in lens hood that can be seen on the other mount versions, likely because the added field of view that came with mounting on a larger sensor would have caused the edges of that hood to appear in the frame. Below are all the versions of the lens side by side, with the new GFX version on the far right:

TTArtisan Launches 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lens for Fujifilm GFX Mount 12

The TTArtisan 11mm f/2.8 is available immediately for $215 and is compatible with the GFX 100, GFX 50s, GFX 5R, and GFX100S.

Source link