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Honor 50 smartphone – hands-on first look

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look

October 27, 2021

Honor’s new 50 smartphone shows the brand has gone beyond its budget roots and is taking on the big players in the premium league

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 1Key features

• 32MP front camera with 90 degree viewing angle
• 108MP main rear camera
• 8MP wide-angle camera
• 2MP macro camera
• 2MP depth of field camera
• Snapdragon 778G 5g chipset
• 6.57 inch curved OLED screen
• £529.99 for the 8GB/256GB RAM/ROM version

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 2

Chinese smartphone maker Honor has announced its Honor 50 smartphone, with a strong emphasis on making vlogging more straightforward. The spec sheet for stills photographers is impressive, too.

The front facing camera aims to give selfie fans more options and features a 32MP front-facing lens which is AI-enhanced to include as many or as few people in the scene as required.

There’s also a 90-degree viewing angle. You can dynamically adjust the field of vision to squeeze more people in without the need for a selfie stick. Alongside the AI wide-angle options, you also have a variety of shooting options on the front-facing camera, including night mode and soft depth of focus.

There are four back facing cameras, with the most powerful one being a 108MP main shooter for high resolution images.

Alongside that is a 2MP macro camera for close-ups, able to shoot a close as 4cm, an 8MP wide-angle lens for landscapes and other bigger vistas and a 2MP bokeh/depth of field lens for more professional-looking portrait shots with background blur.

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 3

As mentioned, the phone is particularly targeted at vloggers. A big selling point for content creators of this kind will be multi-video recording. Essentially, it can take two video feeds, alongside audio, and compress this into a single video file, while maintaining detail and clarity.

There is a single user interface where you can select from multiple modes, pause and play the video, or capture stills as you are recording. The multiple modes are as follows:
Front rear recording
You can record with half the front facing camera and half with rear facing, so you can literally record both sides of a conversation. “When recording footage you don’t have to keep stopping and starting to record what’s in front of you and your reaction,” said the company.
Picture in picture mode
This works in a similar way, but by having the smaller adjustable window, you can show your reaction to something as it happens.
Recording with two rear-facing cameras
Users can record with the main and wide camera and independently control them. You might be recording in a single camera mode and can easily switch to multiple dual view recording. You can also adjust the speed with which you record in real time – 1, 2, 4 or half speed. So it’s possible to get a time lapse followed by slow-motion footage.

Processing power, nice screen
All these features require some processing shovel, and the Honor 50 is first smartphone to feature Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 778G 5g chipset. The 6.57 inch curved OLED screen supports a Full HD+ resolution of 2340×1080 and is able produce 1.07 billion colours. The display is also capable of up to 120Hz refresh rate. Honor also claims the battery can be charged up to 70% within just 20 minutes using the included charger.

Initial thoughts and pricing
Honor began as more of a budget brand in order to differentiate from its former parent, Huawei, but is clearly aiming for a more mainstream audience with this release.

The company has some stiff competition on its hands from Apple, Samsung and other Chinese makers such as Oppo, but the Honor 50 looks an impressive handset with a lot to offer photographers and vloggers. Being able to run the full range of Android and Google applications gives it an obvious advantage over Huawei.

It also a good-looking phone that feels relatively light despite its processing power and is available in Frost Crystal, Emerald Green (our preferred option) and Midnight black.

The phone goes onsale from the 12th November, with prices starting from £449.99 for the 6GB/128GB RAM/ROM configuration and a competitive £529.99 for the 8GB/256GB RAM/ROM configuration.
During the launch, the HONOR 50 Lite was also announced. It is equipped with a 64MP Quad Camera, comes in Deep Sea Blue and Midnight Black, and will retail for £249.99 starting early December.

Watch out for a full review soon. The Magic 3 Pro, which has a dedicated 64MP monochrome camera and other advanced features, is to be released in the UK next year. More details to follow.


Sample images

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 4

General photo mode

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 5

Bokeh mode

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 6

Wide angle mode

Honor 50 smartphone - hands-on first look 7

Wide angle mode

Further reading
Honor Magic 3 with dedicated mono camera

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Canon EOS R3 Hands-On Photos

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On Photos

We’ve been getting hands-on with the Canon EOS R3 mirrorless camera at The Photography Show 2021.

| 
Canon EOS R3 in Mirrorless Cameras

97593 1631968140 (1) | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 488
 

Canon has officially announced the EOS R3 and they’re giving those who attend The Photography Show 2021 the chance to get a first look at this new high-speed mirrorless camera.

Stuart Fawcett was given the opportunity to do just that when he visited the Canon stand at The Photography Show 2021 this Saturday just gone where he described the Canon EOS R3 as a ‘beast of a camera for new and sports photography’. 

 

97593 1631968172 | 1/25 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 396
 

EOS R3 Key Features:

  • New Canon-developed 24.1 megapixel back-illuminated stacked CMOS sensor
  • 30fps with AF/AE tracking
  • Shutter speed offering a range of 30 seconds to 1/64000 of a second when using the electronic shutter
  • Eye Control AF point selection
  • AF tracking of people, animals (including birds) and motorsports (racing motorbikes and racing cars)
  • Full width 6K 60p RAW video recorded internally to a CFexpress card
  • Focus in light levels as low as –7.5 EV 

 

97593 1631968199 |
 

On the EOS R3, Stuart says focusing looks good and he likes the flip-out screen, double grip and EVF. The deep grip makes it really easy to get a good hold of and the top small display is handy for when you want to quickly check settings. All dials/buttons fall nicely into place when in use and the tilting display is great for tricky shooting situations. 

Stuart compared it to his trusty EOS 6D, released way back in 2012, and the EOS R3 looks much more substantial and robust, which isn’t a bad thing, and you can tell a lot of thought has gone into its design. 

 

97593 1631968221 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 391
 

As well as the Canon EOS R3, the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM and 16mm f/2.8 STM were on display and Stuart says the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM focuses fast when used with the EOS R3 and images looked good on the LCD – it’s a nice contender. 

 

Canon 16mm f2.8

 

Canon 100-400mm

 

ePHOTOzine will be writing a full review on the Canon EOS R3, 100-400mm and 16mm lenses as soon as we can. For more information on what’s happening at The Photography Show, have a read of Stuart’s blog

 

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
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Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
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Canon EOS R3 Hands-On Photos

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On Photos

We’ve been getting hands-on with the Canon EOS R3 mirrorless camera at The Photography Show 2021.

| 
Canon EOS R3 in Mirrorless Cameras

97593 1631968140 (1) | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 488
 

Canon has officially announced the EOS R3 and they’re giving those who attend The Photography Show 2021 the chance to get a first look at this new high-speed mirrorless camera.

Stuart Fawcett was given the opportunity to do just that when he visited the Canon stand at The Photography Show 2021 this Saturday just gone where he described the Canon EOS R3 as a ‘beast of a camera for new and sports photography’. 

 

97593 1631968172 | 1/25 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 396
 

EOS R3 Key Features:

  • New Canon-developed 24.1 megapixel back-illuminated stacked CMOS sensor
  • 30fps with AF/AE tracking
  • Shutter speed offering a range of 30 seconds to 1/64000 of a second when using the electronic shutter
  • Eye Control AF point selection
  • AF tracking of people, animals (including birds) and motorsports (racing motorbikes and racing cars)
  • Full width 6K 60p RAW video recorded internally to a CFexpress card
  • Focus in light levels as low as –7.5 EV 

 

97593 1631968199 |
 

On the EOS R3, Stuart says focusing looks good and he likes the flip-out screen, double grip and EVF. The deep grip makes it really easy to get a good hold of and the top small display is handy for when you want to quickly check settings. All dials/buttons fall nicely into place when in use and the tilting display is great for tricky shooting situations. 

Stuart compared it to his trusty EOS 6D, released way back in 2012, and the EOS R3 looks much more substantial and robust, which isn’t a bad thing, and you can tell a lot of thought has gone into its design. 

 

97593 1631968221 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 391
 

As well as the Canon EOS R3, the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM and 16mm f/2.8 STM were on display and Stuart says the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM focuses fast when used with the EOS R3 and images looked good on the LCD – it’s a nice contender. 

 

Canon 16mm f2.8

 

Canon 100-400mm

 

ePHOTOzine will be writing a full review on the Canon EOS R3, 100-400mm and 16mm lenses as soon as we can. For more information on what’s happening at The Photography Show, have a read of Stuart’s blog

 

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Fujifilm X-T30 II Hands-On Photos

Fujifilm X-T30 II Hands-On Photos

Take a look at the Fujifilm X-T30 II which Fujifilm is giving visitors to The Photography Show 2021 the chance to get hands-on with.

| 
Fujifilm X-T30 II in Mirrorless Cameras

X-T30 II

 

Following on from the introduction of the Fujifilm GFX 50S II, Fujifilm has now given people the chance to take a look at the new Fujifilm X-T30 II at The Photography Show 2021

ePz member and events reporter Stuart Fawcett got hands-on with the X-T30 update on the Fujifilm stand where Stuart said that the specs released a few weeks ago describe the camera perfectly.

The X-T30 II looks very much like the original X-T30, even the badge doesn’t have ‘II’ on it, and the only physical difference between the two cameras is the 1.62-million-dot LCD monitor on the rear panel. There are, of course, internal differences and additions which are listed in our news announcement about the new camera. 

 

97593 1631959602 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 227
 

 

Is with the original X-T30, the X-T30 II fits well in the hand with good grip and easily accessible dials and buttons. The display looks good as does the overall design with its retro-feel and familiar layout. 

 

97593 1631959528 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 305
 

 

The X-T30 II will be available in black or silver from October 2021 priced at £769 body only. Two kit options will also be available with the XC 15-45mm f/2.5-5.6 OIS PZ (£849) or the XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS (£1099). 

We’ll be putting the new lenes as well as all of the cameras Fujifilm has recently announced to the test very soon. In the meantime, have a look at our hands-on with the new cameras/lenses in reviews.

For more information on what’s happening at The Photography Show, have a read of Stuart’s blog

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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The Photography Show 2021 Report, Hands-On Photos & Event Coverage

The Photography Show 2021 Report, Hands-On Photos & Event Coverage

The Photography Show

 

It’s been a long wait for photography fans but The Photography Show has finally opened its doors to visitors until 21 September 2021. 

At the event, big industry names such as Nikon have stands where visitors can get hands-on with products as well as learn a thing or two from their speakers who include professional photographers and other industry experts. 

To keep you up-to-date with what’s going on over at the NEC, ePHOTOzine member and events reporter, Stuart Fawcett, has been getting his step count in around the halls to bring you all of the latest news, photos of new products and more. 

You can see a full run-down of what Stuart’s been up to over on his blog but we’ve put a round-up of all that he’s shared in one place so you can easily get the lowdown on this year’s event. 

If you are going later today or tomorrow, there are some guidelines you’ll need to follow which includes showing evidence of having two Covid vaccinations or a negative test and in return, you’ll be handed a band you need to wear so others know you’ve completed this step. We’ve been told the whole process is quick and that you don’t queue for long. 

 

Nikon 

Nikon stand at the photography show

 

On the Nikon stand, you can get hands-on with the Z-Series as well as pick the brains of the experts on-hand to assist you. They also have their superzoom lenses lined up so you can look through them at what’s going on around the show and the Nikon f/2 (1971) is proudly on display in a case alongside the Nikkor 6mm f/2.8 fisheye (1972). 

 

Nikon stand at the photography show

 

Nikon stand at the photography show

 

Nikon stand at the photography show

 

Tamron

18-300 f/2.5-6.3 ASP-C

 

On the Tamron stand, the Tamron 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di III-A VC VXD lens is available to get hands-on with. It’s nice, light and compact for a zoom of that range. There is a good firm zoom action and a zoom lock button so no lens creep occurs. Zooming out sees the lens extending to get all the way out to 300mm.

 

Fujifilm

97593 1631959528 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 305
 

Fujifilm has the new X-T30 II, with a two-way flip-out screen, on display and the specs are a good description of the camera. They also have the new sizable XF 23mm f/1.4 fixed lens for visitors to get hands-on with and it’s got a good weight to it.

The X-T30 II looks very much like the original X-T30, even the badge doesn’t have ‘II’ on it, and the only physical difference between the two cameras is the 1.62-million-dot LCD monitor on the rear panel. 

If you missed it, Fujifilm also announced the Fujifilm GFX 50S II this month. 

As well as cameras and lenses, Fujifilm has exhibitions you can take a look at, studio talks and super picture processing across two big stands. You can also get hands-on with Instax cameras should you be an instant film fan. 

 

97593 1631959602 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 227

 

 

Samyang

Samyang Stand

 

Samyang had a modest display this time but they were super enthusiastic about what’s coming from Samyang and news on the RF mount 85mm that’s coming back once component supply issues recover. 

 

Sigma

Sigma

 

Sigma’s new Sigma 24mm f/2 DG DN and Sigma 90mm f/2.8 DG DN lenses are beautiful, FF/APS-C capable and small. OMG! The 90mm on a Sony body was beautiful to hold. It’s all metal and feels ‘old-school excellent’. In fact, it’s perhaps the best portrait lens I’ve ever held and I can’t wait for ePHOTOzine to review this lens.

Sigma 90mm

 

Vanguard

Vanguard Stand

 

I’ve seen my favourite tripod at The Photography Show on the Vanguard stand – the Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre. It has a double extending centre column and a removable monopod that goes to 166cm. The new leg locks are solid and the 5-section extension feels solid and allow the tripod to compact down to 44cm. The ball head is Arca compatible and it has an optional panning arm that I loved. There’s also a Bluetooth trigger for smartphones that vloggers and bloggers will find useful. It’s priced at £270 and after just a quick look, I feel it’ll be money well spent.  

ePHOTOzine we’ll be reviewing the new range of tripods from Vanguard shortly so do keep a lookout for that. 

 

Wacom 

Wacom

 

Wacom is busy showing loads of new people how to use their products and a new launch product is due soon. P.S Wacom has show offers available if you plan on attending. 

 

Olympus

Olympus Stand

 

Olympus, once again, have a massive stand and loads of cameras to try out including the OM-D E-M1X. The newly announced Olympus 20mm f/1.4 Pro and Olympus 40-150mm f/4 Pro, recently announced in a lens roadmap, are not yet on the stand but are available in a few weeks and ePHOTOzine will be reviewing the optics as soon as they are available. 

 

Canon 

Canon EOS R3

 

Canon had a lot of demos going on and their latest release, the EOS R3, was on display alongside lenses such as the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM and 16mm f/2.8 STM. On the EOS R3, focusing looks good and I like the flip-out screen, double grip and EVF (which looks fine to my eyes). As for the 100-400mml focusing was fast when used with the EOS R3 and even quick in low-ish light levels. Images looked good on the LCD – it’s a nice contender. 

Canon was also looking for feedback from the public about a few camera ideas, the first was what I’m calling the ‘Social Camera’. This camera is designed to let you join in the memory-making of groups and events – how often are you the photographer and excluded from all family/friend images because of it? Well, this little chap can sit down in the action and track around looking to capture all involved – including you – then download the images to your smartphone for you to share. It actually could be great for weddings, parties etc. for all ages. 

Maybe the tiny pocket-sized video cam that you just hold to your shoulder to shoot real-time video where you can zoom up to 300mm is more to your taste? Pictures of both devices are shown below. 

 

Canon 16mm f2.8

 

Canon 100-400mm

 

Canon Stand

 

Canon social camera

 

Canon video camera

 

Sony

Sony Stand

 

Sony was also right in the middle of the show and I got to see a very slick and encouraging set of equipment and had a play with a few cameras, even trying my Canon lenses on Sony cameras with a Sony adapter. There is much to like for me about Sony but I’d really need to be given a strong equipment setup and a month to use it before saying I felt familiar with it. It’s small and light, though, at least until you put the longer lenses on it.

 

A Bit Of Shopping At TPS

Wex

 

LCE

 

Let’s not forget that a good reason to come to The Photography Show is the discounts on offer! There are many available which includes Wex offering up to 30% on some lines and there’s also a trade-in zone where you can get kit valued. 

For those who can’t afford to make a purchase, you can rent lenses – I found this option really interesting. Basically, if you’re not sure about a lens you can hire one and try it out. Various companies do this now which include Lens For Hire and Lens Pimp. Canon might even do something for free, too. 

 

Talks, Theatres & Lessons

The Photography Show 2021 Report, Hands-On Photos & Event Coverage 8

 

There are loads of talks spread across 4+ general theatres, and perhaps as many again in the camera maker’s theatres. The only talk I went to was by Simon McCheung encouraging us all to consider what a fine art photographer was and how we might want to do this ourselves. He outlined his journey and approach to this area – it started with a 365 project of self-portraits with a surreal feel and minimal background distractions. He then goes on to define each image from 5 key Image considerations.

  1. Imagination – describing how he imagines the picture will look to him and the viewer, perhaps anchoring it to a cinematic style or image genre.
  2. Aesthetes – the presentation style of the image
  3. Intellectual Content – the shared reason for the scene and what it means to the viewer – even based around activism
  4. Symbolisms – the pictorial elements that will convey the message you are giving
  5. Moods/Emotions – how you want the viewer to feel about the image.

Surreal and Photoshop can feature heavily in these images so might this be a genre for you to try?

 

One of the theatres was an action zone challenging you to capture fast-moving images in low light, courtesy of Fusion_Extreme. I didn’t have the ideal equipment set-up but my trusty Canon 6D with ISO on ISO12800 and a 70-300mm lens captured these images and I had a lot of fun doing it. 

 

Basketballs

 

BMX tricks

 

Other Interesting Stands At The Photography Show

 

Natasha J Bella

 

Look out for the amazing Natasha J Bella, a beautiful, talented business-minded UK model with her own stand at the show. What she showed the modelling & photographic community is amazing resourcefulness with remote shoots – Covid locked us all down and instead of losing her regular income stream she went online and set up for remote shoots from her home studio. She also runs professional well-supported training sessions for photographers and other models on how to do this. I’d wager there were thousands more remote shoots during lockdown directly because of her, that’s thousands of more people keeping their business/photography passion going when everyone was isolated and feeling a bit down. It’s almost a public service for some if you ask me…

 

To see what else is happening at The Photography Show 2021, have a read of Stuart’s blog: Visiting ‘The Photography Show’ & Coverage For ePz

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Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 9

After months of teasing, Canon finally let me get my hands onto a pre-production EOS R3 for a few days, during which time I tried every test I could think of.

I ended up generating so much material that I made not one, but two video reviews all about it which you can see below — in particular, the second one includes a lot of quality results for photos and videos you may not yet have seen anywhere else.

But as a brief summary, below are ten highlights that I think are worth noting, and again remember my test sample was a pre-production model.

The Camera Body

The body, with its built-in portrait grip, looks and feels great, like a slightly shrunken and lighter version of the 1Dx Mark III, and Canon claims the same weather-proofing too.

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 10

The Sensor

The sensor, Canon’s first stacked CMOS design, has 24 Megapixels and suffers from much less rolling shutter in stills and video than any Canon EOS I’ve tested so far. There’s still a little skewing if you really pan quickly, but it’s so much better-behaved than the EOS R5, R6, and 1Dx III – roughly similar to my results from the Alpha 1.

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 11

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 12

It’s Fast

It’s as fast as the best of its rivals too. I confirmed burst speeds of 30fps using the electronic shutter for birds in flight using Servo AF on the RF 70-200mm f2.8L, and there’s electronic shutter speeds up to 1/64000. Meanwhile, the mechanical shutter operates at 12fps at up to 1/8000.

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 13

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 14

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 15

Video Features

There’s no 8k video, but 4k video is oversampled in all modes from 24 to 60p and in my tests so far looks as good as 4k HQ on the EOS R5. Better still, you can finally keep recording beyond 30 minutes per clip, and I managed just over two hours of 4k 25p IPB in a single clip on a single battery charge, and without over-heating warnings too.

Power Delivery

Under external USB-C power from my MacBook Pro USB-C charger, I managed to achieve the maximum six-hour clip length, again in 4k 25p IPB and again without any over-heating warnings.

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 16

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 17

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 18

RAW

There’s also 6k RAW internal recording up to 60p, but I’ve not tried that yet. Sadly it doesn’t yet squirt RAW over HDMI to a Ninja.

Eye-Control Autofocus

Once calibrated a couple of times, the new eye control system allows you to place a target anywhere on the frame with eerie accuracy. In use, you look at the subject you want, then push the shutter or AF-On to let the camera’s AF system take over the tracking. It’s a game-changer for team sports or even street photography where you can quickly move between subjects, but the R3 also supports the 1Dx III’s Smart Controller as well as traditional joysticks and touch control.

Vehicle Autofocus

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 19

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 20

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 21

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On: 10 Things You Need to Know 22

The new vehicle AF mode successfully identified cars and bikes in my tests, surrounding them with a flexible box. Canon says you’ll also be able to prioritize focus on drivers with helmets, but that didn’t work in my tests so far.

The New HotShoe

The new accessory shoe adds extra pins under the lip for comms and power, like Sony’s existing multi-interface shoe. Canon’s already announced a shotgun mic that doesn’t need an audio cable or its own batteries, and a Speedlite transmitter that’s smaller as it uses the camera’s power and menus.

Hardware GPS

Contrary to some reports, the R3 does include built-in hardware GPS which eliminates the need to pair your phone, although there are loads of mobile options including support for Apple MFI-certified USB connections to iPhones for third party apps. Contrary to a comment in my first video, some of the buttons on the rear are backlit after all — they just weren’t working on my sample, sorry!


For more photos and a detailed rundown of Gordon’s time with the EOS R3, visit Camera Labs. All images above were captured with a pre-production version of the EOS R3 and are not necessarily indicative of final production quality. Images provided courtesy of Gordon Laing.


About the author: Gordon Laing is the Editor of Cameralabs where he presents gear reviews and photography tutorials. He recently launched Dino Bytes, a new channel to indulge his love of vintage tech and retro gaming, with videos about classic cameras, computers, consoles, phones, and more! He’s been a journalist for so long he actually reviewed most of this stuff the first time around. Gordon is also into food, drink, and travel, and is the author of “In Camera,” a book that embraces the art of JPEG photography with no post-processing.

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Hands-On With the New RICOH GR IIIx: Is This the Best APS-C Street Photography Camera?

Hands-On With the New RICOH GR IIIx: Is This the Best APS-C Street Photography Camera?

RICOH has just announced their newest version of a previously popular — albeit reasonably rare to see in the wild — crop sensor body. With a new lens, this could well be a serious contender for a walkaround street photography camera and at a reasonable price!

RICOH is a bit of a strange beast, I hope they won’t mind me saying. They fly so far under the radar for most that you rarely see anyone with them. Nevertheless, photography enthusiasts and industry nerds like myself are more than aware of them. They have something of a cult following and you rarely see anybody particularly critical of their cameras. What they aim to do, they do well.

The RICOH GR III was released in March 2019, featuring a 28mm, wide-angle lens, and was revered for its small form factor, ease of use, and image quality. They quickly became popular with street photographers, leading RICOH to even launch a Street Edition version of the GR III.

The new RICOH GR IIIx retains more or less everything its predecessor had, but with some important changes, most notably being the new lens. The 26.1mm GR lens on the APS-C sensor provides the equivalent of a 40mm angle of view on a 35mm sensor; a popular and common focal length in street photography due to its versatility.

What has always been the most impressive about this range, to me at least, is that while it does what it aims to do very well, its cost is more than reasonable. The new GR IIIx is up on the RICOH website for €999, though it isn’t on B&H yet to see the price in USD. For reference, the GR III is $896.95.

Hopefully, I can get my hands on one of these to put it through its paces!

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Hands-On With the Fujinon XF R LM WR 33mm f/1.4

Hands-On With the Fujinon XF R LM WR 33mm f/1.4

There are some great lenses in the Fuji range and this new release looks to further that history. In this video, see behind-the-scenes of a shoot with their latest offering and how it performs for studio portraiture.

I am undoubtedly a big fan of Fujifilm cameras and have discussed them at length before. While they rarely produce anything outlandish and headline-grabbing outside of the GFX range, they consistently produce great cameras and glass. Their crop sensor range of bodies is arguably the best out there — certainly the best looking when you get one in silver! — and the line-up of lenses may also match it.

Their newest release is the Fujifilm XF R LM WR 33mm f/1.4 for APS-C cameras. That means, the lens is the equivalent to 50mm on a full frame camera — a popular and versatile focal length. The letters after the name denote weather resistance (WR), an aperture ring on the barrel (R), and a linear motor (LM). The maximum aperture is of course nice and wide, which adds a lot of appeal to any prime lens. What typically happens when you have such a nice combination of specs, is the price is too high. The issue with crop sensor lenses being expensive is they do not appeal to the core demographic of APS-C, and fortunately, the 33mm f/1.4 is reasonable, at $799 brand new.

Do you shoot with APS-C cameras? Would this lens fit nicely into your kit bag and workflow?

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Fujifilm GFX 50S II Hands-On Review With Sample Photos

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Hands-On Review With Sample Photos

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

It’s been 5-years since Fujifilm first introduced the Fujifilm GFX 50S at Photokina 2016 and today, Fujifilm has announced that the popular medium format mirrorless camera system has had an update that modernises the range and also makes it more affordable.

The new Fujifilm GFX 50S II arrived after Fujifilm tasked its designers with the challenge of making a GFX camera that still offers high-quality shooting but at a price that’s accessible to more people. In fact, the designers were asked to make a medium format mirrorless camera, with lens, for under £4000 and with the kit lens combo coming in at £3899, it looks like the team definitely succeeded. For those wanting to spend a little less, you can also pick up the GFX 50S II body-only for £3,499.

We were given the opportunity to get hands-on with the new Fujifilm GFX 50S II as well as the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR to give our first impressions on the new kit line-up and we were also able to capture sample photos, too, so you can see for yourself how the camera and lens performs.  

As well as the Fujifilm GFX 50S II and the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR, Fujifilm has also announced an update to the X-T30 camera (Fujifilm X-T30 II) and two new lenses: Fujifilm XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR and the Fujifilm XF 23mm f/1.4 R LM WR.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Features

GFX 50S Mark II
 

The GFX 50S II features a 51.4MP large-format sensor and uses the X-Processor 4 so the sensor might be older but as it’s coupled with the newer processor, Fujifilm says overall performance is given a boost.

5-axis in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) is built-in offering up to 6.5-stops of vibration reduction which is the highest seen on a camera from the GFX series. We also see improvements in the AF system as the X-Processor 4 and some clever algorithms mean that Face/Eye Detection are more accurate.

There’s a ‘Pixel Shift Multi-Shot’ function that can be used to capture 200MP images and it’s a mode that was first introduced on the GFX100. If you want to learn more about this function, have a read of our GFX 100s review.

19 Film Simulations are built-in including ‘Nostalgic Neg.’ which was launched on the GFX100S and all of the options can be selected from the menu where you’ll find advice on what subjects they’re best used with. You can also check how the image will look with a particular Film Simulation applied in Live View.

There’s no 4K video available but you can capture Full HD video for up to 2-hours.

In total, there are 79 upgraded functions/features available on the GFX 50S II of which are not currently available as a firmware update for the GFX 50S.

As for lens compatibility, the camera uses the GF lens mount, and there are a good number of GF mount lenses from Fujifilm (with some third party support) currently available. The range also continues to grow, too, with the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR been announced alongside the camera and the Fujifilm lens road map showing three new GF lenses arriving between 2022 and 2023. 

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Key Features:

  • 51.4-megapixel sensor
  • X-Processor 4
  • Fujifilm GF lens mount
  • Electronic viewfinder (EVF)
  • 3.2inch screen
  • 19 types of Film Simulation
  • Weather and dust resistant system
  • Top LCD screen
  • Simplified design with PSAM dial 
  • Improved AF
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) 

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Handling

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

The Fujifilm GFX 50S II is aimed at those who enjoy shooting landscapes as well as portrait photography or those with small studios. Fujifilm is also hoping students will consider purchasing the new camera but it’ll be a considerable investment for them with prices above £3000. That said, it is less expensive than the GFX 50S, GFX 50R, GFX100 and GFX100S.

The first thing you’ll notice when you pick up the Fujifilm GFX 50S II is the simpler controls (when compared with the GFX 50S) which Fujifilm are hoping will make the camera feel more familiar to those switching from DSLRs. We actually like the simplified layout with the PSAM control dial doing its job of making the design feel a little more traditional. It also makes the camera easier to use as the controls are straightforward. In fact, the mode dial makes it easy to pick up and start using the camera without having to study a manual (too much), and just start shooting.

In terms of shape and design, it actually looks pretty much identical to the GFX100S but the body is a bit slimmer. In the hand, it feels very ergonomic with a deep grip that gives you the confidence to carry it in just one hand while walking around capturing photos. The rear of the camera also has a raised area for your thumb to hold on to and there’s ample rubber grip on the camera, with a good texture, and plenty of space for your fingers to grip on to. If you want to, you can purchase an optional metal handgrip which could be useful for when teaming the GFX 50S II with longer lenses but with the kit lens, the camera handled well.

Size-wise, it measures 104.2mm by 87.2mm and weighs 900g which makes it a compact medium format camera when compared with the GFX100 but some other medium format mirrorless cameras are lighter/more compact.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

 

As you’d expect from a Fujifilm medium format mirrorless camera, the GFX 50S II is constructed from a magnesium alloy and shouts quality. It’s also weather-sealed so won’t have any problems with the good old British weather.

On top of the GFX 50S II, you find the PSAM control dial that also has 6 different custom modes on the mode dial, so you can set up the camera exactly how you want it for different shooting scenarios, and you’ll also find a Movie / Still switch so you can quickly switch between stills and video recording.

The small top LCD can be illuminated with a small button on the side of the EVF housing. On default settings, it shows you all the expected camera settings, such as ISO, aperture, shutter speed, film mode, battery life and mode, but it can also be changed to show a live histogram, or virtual ISO and Shutter speed dials.

Also on top are a couple of buttons, on/off switch, shutter button and flash hotshoe.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

Turn our attention to the rear of the GFX 50S II and we find a three-way tilting 3.2inch screen that offers good colour reproduction. The viewfinder is the same EVF we’ve seen previously (3.69 million dots and 0.77x magnification) but it’s not removable as it was on the 50S and there’s a large rubber eye-cup to help make the camera more comfortable to use when you hold it up to your eye, and it also helps avoid getting nose prints on the screen as it puts some distance between the camera and your face.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

Other functions on the back include a variety of buttons, a command wheel, a small Q button you can use to access additional settings and a joystick control which is slightly bigger and more tactile. Ports and the dual SD card slot remain the same.

Battery life is rated at 455 frames and it’s a 2200MaH battery. The GFX 50s captured around 400 frames on a full battery so when using the GFX 50S II, you’ll be able to capture a few more shots.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Performance

Fujifilm GFX 50S Mark II
 

We didn’t have too long with the GFX 50S II but we can safely say that it’s capable of producing exceptional JPEG images straight from the camera. Colour reproduction is excellent and there is plenty of detail in photos. AF performance is generally good, too.

As mentioned, 19 film simulations are available, all producing different effects. The black and white filters are a favourite but all of them open up more creative doors.

 

Fujifilm GFX 50S II Sample Photos

 

Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR

P1010043 | 1/60 sec | f/2.8 | 23.0 mm | ISO 200
 

We paired the Fujifilm GFX 50S II with the new compact and lightweight Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR zoom lens. The lens covers the popular focal length ranges of 28mm-55mm in the 35mm film format and we found it to be a great walkaround lens when shooting handheld with quick and quiet AF. It’s dust- and moisture-resistant and comes equipped with a deep hood to protect the front element from flare. 

You can find more images of the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR zoom lens over in news.  

 

Value For Money

The GFX 50S II is priced at £3499 body only or £3899 with the 35-70mm kit lens. It’s less expensive than the GFX100S and GFX100 and overall, it’s definitely a more affordable medium format mirrorless camera option.

 

Early Verdict

We won’t comment too much on our final thoughts until we’ve put the GFX 50S II through our full review process but so far, we’re impressed with the image quality straight from the camera and also with the price as these two things combined mean that Fujifilm has created a more affordable medium format mirrorless camera that anyone can, literally, pick up and start taking photos with.

We look forward to putting the camera through its paces in a full review very soon.  

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Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR Hands-On And Sample Photos

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR Hands-On And Sample Photos

We’ve got hands-on with the new Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR lens designed to be used with the X Series of mirrorless digital cameras.

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Interchangeable Lenses

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/2.4 R LM WR
 

Fujifilm has introduced a new standard prime lens for X Mount (Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR) that gives those using an X Series mirrorless camera a versatile prime lens that Fuji is describing as an ‘essential new-generation lens for all X Mount users.’ 

To find out how this new-generation large-aperture prime lens performs, we were given the opportunity to take a pre-production model on a walk around London where we were able to capture several images to share with you. We teamed the Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR with the Fujifilm X-Pro3 which you can read about in our full review from 2019. 

You can learn more about the new Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR lens over in news and see the pre-production sample photos below. 

 

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR Sample Photos

 

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.4 R LM WR Hands-On Photos of Equipment

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