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Hard day’s shoot: lost Beatles images on display

Hard day's shoot: lost Beatles images on display

November 26, 2021

Enjoying the new Peter Jackson Beatles documentary on Disney +? Beatles obsessives and photo historians will also be interested in checking out some never-seen-before shots of the fabs, taken by another larger-than-life character, Lord Christopher Thynne

Thynne (1934 – 2017) shot the band in spring 1964 on the movie set of Hard Day’s Night.

The son of the 6th Marquess of Bath, Thynne had been sacked as controller of the family seat in Longleat and was pursuing a more bohemian lifestyle in swinging London. The negatives remained undeveloped for 57 years but were recently rediscovered.

Thynne, while not as well known as his even more colourful brother Alexander, aka the Loins of Longleat, also made headlines in his own right. His photography, however, ended up taking a back seat.

The images are on show at the Shapero Modern Gallery in Mayfair, central London, from December 9 to January 16, 2022 and admission is free.

Tabitha Philpott-Kent, Gallery Director, comments: “It’s an amazing opportunity to see a rare collection of important, never-seen-before images. These unearthed images will be on sale for £400 – £650 for a limited period of time only. As we approach the festive season, these photographic prints will delight Beatles fans across the world and provide a brilliant investment for collectors of art, photography and music memorabilia.”

Each of the developed prints are available in two sizes, but strictly limited to 35 of each. When Thynne shot the moptops, they’d just returned from their first tour of the United States and were on the brink of their celebrated 1964 World Tour, which sparked a mania and fandom so colossal that the Spectator described it as ‘hysterical’.


Hard day's shoot: lost Beatles images on display 1Hard day's shoot: lost Beatles images on display 2

Hard day's shoot: lost Beatles images on display 3

George away from the filming, getting down at a Mayfair nightclub

Hard day's shoot: lost Beatles images on display 4Hard day's shoot: lost Beatles images on display 5

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Nikon Z9 ‘Dual-Stream’ Tech Records and Displays Images with No Lag

Nikon Z9 'Dual-Stream' Tech Records and Displays Images with No Lag

Nikon has published a short video that further explains the “Dual-stream” technology in its upcoming Z9 flagship camera, which it says will always assure an accurate reality-to-viewfinder experience.

The Dual-stream technology is part of Nikon’s technology for what it bills as a “real-live” viewfinder experience in the Z9. The company says that the tech is only made possible thanks to the combination of the newly-developed stacked CMOS sensor and the EXPEED 7 image-processing engine, which allows photos to be displayed on the electronic viewfinder or LCD monitor (whichever is being used to monitor capture) as well as record that still-image data to a memory card at the exact same time.

Nikon says this differs from other “blackout-free” shooting experiences from competitors as other implementations have some kind of a delay between what is seen and what is captured.

“Unlike conventional blackout-free shooting that displays the same frame to prevent interruption of the finder image, this viewfinder continues to display the actual movement of the subject within the scene, so that every single moment can be smoothly and continuously confirmed with no skipped frames or loss of view,” Nikon claims.

“Because this is achieved even when continuous shooting is repeated over a short period of time, it is ideal for scenes in which tracking of quickly moving subjects is required, such as during sports, allowing users to reliably capture the finest moments without missing any shutter opportunities.”

The video above shows that the pixel array captures image data and moves it through to the camera’s circuitry and simultaneously then streams that data to two separate outputs, one to the viewfinder or LCD and one to the memory card.

Nikon Z9 'Dual-Stream' Tech Records and Displays Images with No Lag 6

“Dual-stream technology processes data for live view and recording separately and in parallel, which makes the Real-Live Viewfinder possible,” the company further explains.

The company says this particular implementation delivers a smooth view that reveals every single moment of the capture, including those previously missed by conventional electronic viewfinder systems or those that block the view due to a mirror in DSLRs.

The video also shows a “competitor” camera that skips and repeats some frames side by side with Nikon’s implementation, though the company does not state which camera it is comparing the Z9 experience to.

The Nikon Z9 features a 45.7-megapixel stacked CMOS sensor, 8K video capability, and is the first professional full-frame mirrorless camera to be released without a physical shutter. It is scheduled to become available to purchase by the end of the year for $5,500.

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How to hide a secret message in your images

A teaser for the new Kansas City Royals uniforms.

The Kansas City Royals—it’s a baseball team, I had to look it up—posted a dark, moody preview photo of the new team uniform. You really can’t see much but enterprising fans who brightened the pic were met with a secret message: “nice try”.

Hidden details

This isn’t the first time this year that people have tried to use image-editing apps to reveal hidden details—though it hasn’t always been in the name of fun. 

The Silhouette Challenge on TikTok started out as a fun way for people to feel empowered and good about their bodies. It involved using a heavy, red filter to obscure all but the outline of one’s physique. Of course, Internet “creeps” quickly ruined everything. Tips for reducing the silhouette effect through desaturation and image brightening (to catch a glimpse of more than was intended) quickly began circulating. Sigh.

On a less gross/creepy note, I’ve used a similar technique when I was playing the zombie videogame The Last of Us: Part Two. Look, zombies are scary and to make getting through some of the darker areas easier, I just cranked up the brightness on my TV.

Steganography

And, of course, hiding messages in plain sight has a long history in spycraft. The technique is called steganography, and it can be used to sneak messages into almost anything. 

One of the biggest modern examples is printers: Most color laser printers add a series of yellow dots to every sheet they print. The dots encode the unique identification number of the printer, when the documents were printed, and things like that. It’s probably how whistleblower Reality Winner was caught, though, unsurprisingly, the NSA is staying quiet. 

This is, of course, not quite as amusing as what the Royals did, but still working on much the same idea. 

Doing it yourself

To hide your own secret message in a photo, start with an image with lots of shadows.
To hide your own secret message in a photo, start with an image with lots of shadows. Popular Photography

If you want to hide a Kansas City Royals’ style message in your own photo, it’s pretty simple to do with an app like Adobe Photoshop. I played around with a few different methods and this is what worked best for me:

Find an image you like with some nice deep shadows and open it in your image editor of choice. 

Use a Text layer to add your message and set the text color so that it’s roughly as bright as the surrounding area, but a different color. I went with this saturated blue to stand out from my green T-shirt. 

You can use just about any image editor to hide a message. We used Photoshop.
You can use just about any image editor to hide a message. We used Photoshop. Popular Photography

Add a load of contrast darkening all the deep shadows even more. I used a Curves layer, but use whatever you’re comfortable with. 

Don't forget to darken the shadows even more, to truly hide your message.
Don’t forget to darken the shadows even more, to truly hide your message. Popular Photography

Save your image and put it out into the world. Anyone will be able to decode it by brightening all the shadows a ridiculous amount. 

Stenography at its simplest!
Stenography at its simplest! Popular Photography

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5 Australian Beaches to Visit For Seascape Images

5 Australian Beaches to Visit For Seascape Images

Australia boasts some of the best beaches in the world. If you photograph water and you haven’t visited, then you are certainly missing out!

In this video, landscape and seascape photographer Jeremy Payne highlights some of his favorite Gold Coast beaches to visit whether you are a local or visiting from out of state (or even out of the country!). The beauty of Australia is that many of the beaches which might surround a particular city or town are usually all within driving distance of one another so you could potentially visit two or three within a day. Of course, if you have the option why not book a longer stay and do a beach a day instead and really get to know the ins and outs of it from sunrise to sunset; or shorter if you’d prefer.

What is really refreshing about Payne’s video is the candor with which he happily shares his go-to locations. By sharing he helps to foster a strong sense of community and belonging with fellow photographers. I know I’ve often wondered how something was photographed and there are plenty of photographers who share tips and tricks. What is less common, but refreshing to see, is the sharing of locations.

An image is very much about a sense of place. No two places, even if similar, are ever the same. Places hold a unique sense of aura. Obviously in this case I am referring to Walter Benjamin’s definition. Even if a place is unique, having different photographers and artists create work based on their vision of it offers slightly different layers and facets to the same location. What I see isn’t what Payne might see. What you see isn’t what I might see. It’s how we each view the world which creates different photographs and less so what is being photographed.

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An Interview With Martin Palm: Constructing Small Sets and Images With Big Impact

An Interview With Martin Palm: Constructing Small Sets and Images With Big Impact

Martin Palm is a commercial photographer based in Sweden. He strives to create clean minimalist images that offer a unique point of view.

Martin began photographer by way of graphic design. He was working for magazines and creating print ads. As part of his job, he was tasked with creating editorial images to accompany articles. Although he was always interested in photography, it wasn’t something he thought he could do because of his shyness.

I can speak from my own experience of using the camera as a social tool. Being an introvert with a camera gives you a reason to connect with others.

For Martin, being tasked with photography made him realize that the camera could be a social device: through his camera, he could communicate with others! On his earliest shoots, he’d bring friends along to help break the ice and help chat with and direct subjects. Of course, he doesn’t bring his friends along to do this now on commercial shoots.An Interview With Martin Palm: Constructing Small Sets and Images With Big Impact 7

Creating a visual brand identity is something Martin enjoys and excels at.

The simplicity to do commercial product photography is what drives me.

When working with a client, his instinct is to find a singular point of difference that he can replicate across multiple brand properties. A concept doesn’t have to be complicated; a simple concept that is executed can be very effective. He references Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan’s “The Comedian.” Duct-taping a banana to a wall isn’t complicated. But the work became notorious recently!

In a recent campaign, Martin photographed a series of underwear images on a plain background. He also added drips of paint; these were out of context and didn’t exactly fit. What does underwear have to do with paint? But it does fit somehow through the simplicity of colors. The paint adds a whimsically incongruent element to the images, which further highlights the colors of the product.

The client loved the concept so much that Martin pitched a collaboration between his sneaker brand using a similar visual language. The campaign, which was released just before summer, hints at melted ice cream but also still lives within the broader identity of the brand.

Martin’s recent project creating lifelike models of car images was borne of his passion for creating fantasy scenes.

There’s a part of me that loves the unknown that doesn’t really exist.

The images are strictly photographs with nothing computer-generated. But they exist within a space that isn’t real because they wouldn’t exist outside of a photograph. That is to say, that as a concept, everything in the image only exists to help create the image. Again, there is a strong clarity of concept with special attention and care given to the execution of the work.

Producing car images is exactly that: a huge production. Working with model cars allowed Martin to create car images without having a huge team; but also leans into his strengths of product imagery. The images pay homage to real preexisting car images photographed by other photographers but using models. Martin wanted to see how close could he come to a big-budget production using small-scale models. I reckon he got pretty close!

How can I make an impression on someone with less effort but with a wow factor?

To backtrack a bit, one of Martin’s clients includes an architectural firm that hires him to create CGI renders of their plans. Martin was inspired by the constructed nature of these CGI images but wanted to take this idea of construction into the real world. He could have just rendered his images on a computer, but there is a certain look that only photographing “real” objects provides. Working with models makes the images special.

I’ve never been the photographer who likes to travel to make these pictures.

Although he has worked on shoots where he has to travel and coordinate locations, he finds working in a studio to be much more fulfilling. Finding a place within photography is about finding photographs that lean into your skill set and way of thinking.

Creative vision is very important to Martin. He admits that he pre-visualizes all his work and knows exactly how the final images will look.

It’s a major thing when it comes to my kind of work, when it comes to sets. I don’t know how other creatives are actually thinking, but many times, the image I create is already created before it’s done.

This is a major part of creative practice, but often, the struggle is being able to communicate the final image to a client. As a creative, you can see the final image, but explaining that to a non-creative is important to work as a commercial photographer.

Over the last couple of years, Martin’s product photographic practice has leaned into the use of video lights. When shooting tethered, he can see exactly how the lights will look in the final image. Additionally, he’s able to use long exposures for creative and technical effects! His light of choice is the Godox SL-60 with a reflector and small softbox.

He confesses that he still uses flashes when working with human subjects or when he needs more power for physically larger sets.

Time is what haunts us creatives everyday. I have always looked for ways to create more time.

An Interview With Martin Palm: Constructing Small Sets and Images With Big Impact 8

A big part of creative practice for Martin is being able to work efficiently. It’s less about using one type of light or camera or feature, but rather using what is best for a particular job.

To be a commercial photographer, you are always a cost. You are not an investment. I don’t like that part; it takes so much energy from your creative side. Helping people has been something I’ve wanted to achieve in some way.

Which is a great place to end this article with a lesson: do something well and keep doing it. That’s it. It’s that simple.

Images used with permission from Martin Palm.

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Excellent front camera images and video

Excellent front camera images and video

The Pixel 6 Pro is Google’s top-end smartphone for 2021. It comes with a 6.71-inch display, Google’s new Tensor chipset, a triple-camera with ultra-wide and tele lens, as well as 12 GB RAM and up to 512 GB of storage.

The new front camera for selfie shooting features an 11.1 MP sensor that sits behind a fixed focus lens with f/2.2 aperture and, as usual, Google uses its innovative image processing algorithms to optimize image quality in all shooting conditions. Let’s see how the Google Pixel 6 Pro performed in the DXOMARK Selfie test for smartphone front cameras.

Key front camera specifications:

  • 11.1 MP sensor, 1.22 μm pixels
  • f/2.2 aperture
  • 94° field of view
  • Fixed focus
  • 4K/30 fps, 1080p/30fps

About DXOMARK Camera tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone camera reviews, DXOMARK engineers capture and evaluate over 3000 test images and more than 2.5 hours of video both in controlled lab environments and in natural indoor and outdoor scenes, using the camera’s default settings. This article is designed to highlight the most important results of our testing. For more information about the DXOMARK Camera test protocol, click here. More details on how we score smartphone cameras are available here.

Test summary

Excellent front camera images and video 9
Google Pixel 6 Pro

Excellent front camera images and video 10

102

selfie

Pros

  • Generally good exposure in photo and video
  • Accurate white balance and nice color
  • Well-controlled noise
  • Pretty wide dynamic range in video
  • Neutral white balance and nice skin tones in video
  • Effective video stabilization

Cons

  • Loss of fine detail
  • Face out of focus at close distance (30 cm)
  • No blur gradient in bokeh mode
  • Noise in video clips, especially in low light
  • Lack of detail in low light video
  • Hue shifts on face and over sharpening in bright light and indoor video

With a DXOMARK Selfie overall score of 102 the Google Pixel 6 Pro offers the best Selfie camera currently available in the US market, besting such esteemed competition as Apple’s new iPhone 13 series or the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra. It also takes a position very close to the top in our global ranking where it is only surpassed by the recent phones from Huawei.

The excellent Photo score of 107 is based on a great performance for exposure and color. Google’s HDR+ system delivers nicely exposed portrait subjects and good contrast, even in scenes with strong backlighting. Skin tones are rendered nicely for any type of skin and in all light conditions. Image artifacts are overall very well under control, too.

The video score of 95 is also one of the best we have seen. Stabilization stands out in this category, with excellent stabilization when handholding the device and of movement of the face in the frame. Dynamic range is good, too, but not quite on the same high level as the latest Apple devices.

Overall the Pixel 6 Pro’s front camera hardware design delivers an excellent trade-off between a wide depth of field that keeps all subjects in group shots in focus, and high light sensitivity, which helps produce good image quality in difficult low light scenes. It’s therefore an easy recommendation to any passionate selfie shooter.

Photo

The Google Pixel 6 Pro achieves a Selfie Photo score of 107. In this section, we take a closer look at each sub-attribute and compare image quality against competitors.

Excellent front camera images and video 12

Exposure and Contrast

In these tests we analyze target exposure, contrast, and dynamic range, including repeatability across a series of images. Tests are undertaken in a wide range of light conditions, including backlit scenes and low light down to 1 lux. The score is derived from a number of objective measurements in the lab and perceptual analysis of real-life images.

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s exposure performance in bright light. Target exposure is generally accurate and more consistent across consecutive shots than on the competitors. Dynamic range is fairly wide and shadow contrast is better than on the comparison devices.

Excellent front camera images and video 13
Google Pixel 6 Pro, accurate target exposure and fairly wide dynamic range, excellent contrast in the shadows (hair and background)
Excellent front camera images and video 14

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, accurate target exposure and fairly wide dynamic range

Excellent front camera images and video 15

Huawei P50 Pro, accurate target exposure and fairly wide dynamic range

This graph shows the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s exposure performance across light levels.

Excellent front camera images and video 16

Exposure comparison: the Pixel 6 Pro achieves a brighter exposure in low light than the iPhone 13 Pro and the measured target exposure is generally high.

Excellent front camera images and video 17

Color

In these tests we analyze color rendering, skin tones, white balance, and color shading, including repeatability across a series of images. The score is derived from a number of objective measurements in the lab and perceptual analysis of real-life images.

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s color performance in bright light. Skin tones and color are generally accurate. While many devices struggle to produce accurate white balance in scenes with monochromatic backgrounds, the Pixel 6 Pro delivers better results in such conditions than the iPhone 13 Pro and Huawei P50 Pro.

Excellent front camera images and video 18

Google Pixel 6 Pro, neutral white balance, nice skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 19

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, warm white balance and skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 20

Huawei P50 Pro, desaturated skin tones, accurate white balance

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s color performance in an indoor setting. In this kind of scene, white balance is generally neutral with nice skin tones across all types of skins, even in challenging high-contrast shots. The Apple iPhone 13 Pro generally has a white balance cast with orange skin tone rendering.

Excellent front camera images and video 21

Google Pixel 6 Pro, neutral white balance, accurate skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 22

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, white balance cast, orange skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 23

Huawei P50 Pro, neutral white balance, accurate skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 24

Focus

Huawei P50 Pro

Best: Huawei P50 Pro (97)

In these tests we analyze autofocus accuracy and shooting time, including repeatability, in the lab. We test focus failures, depth of field, and tracking of moving subjects using perceptual analysis of real-life images.

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s focus performance at a subject distance of 30 cm. At this close distance, the face is slightly out of focus, with lower sharpness than the comparison devices. At 120 cm (selfie stick distance) sharpness is on the same level as the iPhone 13 Pro.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, focus

Excellent front camera images and video 26

Google Pixel 6 Pro, crop: face slightly out of focus

Apple iPhone 13 Pro, focus

Excellent front camera images and video 28

Apple iPhone 13 Pro, crop: face in focus

Excellent front camera images and video 30

Huawei P50 Pro, crop: face in focus

Excellent front camera images and video 31

Texture

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro

Best: Asus ZenFone 7 Pro (79)

In these tests we analyze texture on faces and objects, including objects in motion, in a range of light conditions, using several lab test setups and perceptual analysis of real-life images.

This graph shows the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s texture performance in the lab across different light levels. Measured texture acutance is slightly lower than for the iPhone and Huawei, especially in scenes with motion. This results in more loss of fine detail than on the comparison devices.

Excellent front camera images and video 32

Texture comparison: The Pixel 6 Pro front camera delivers high acutance, comparable with the Huawei P50 Pro.

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s texture performance indoors.

Google Pixel 6 Pro , indoor texture

Excellent front camera images and video 34

Google Pixel 6 Pro , crop: loss of fine detail

Apple iPhone 13 Pro, indoor texture

Excellent front camera images and video 36

Apple iPhone 13 Pro, crop: fine detail is preserved

Huawei P50 Pro, indoor texture

Excellent front camera images and video 38

Huawei P50 Pro, crop: very fine detail is preserved

Excellent front camera images and video 39

Noise

Huawei P40 Pro

Best: Huawei P40 Pro (90)

In these tests we analyze noise on faces and objects, including objects in motion, in a range of light conditions, using several lab test setups and perceptual analysis of real-life images.

This graph shows the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s noise performance in the lab across different light levels.

Visual noise is a metric that measures noise as perceived by end-users. It takes into account the sensitivity of the human eye to different spatial frequencies under different viewing conditions.

Excellent front camera images and video 40

Noise comparison: Noise is well controlled on the Pixel 6 Pro and Huawei P50 Pro. Noise is noticeable on the Apple iPhone 13 Pro.

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s noise performance under indoor lighting conditions.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, visual noise

Excellent front camera images and video 42

Google Pixel 6 Pro, crop: noise is well controlled

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, visual noise

Excellent front camera images and video 44

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, crop: luminance noise

Huawei P50 Pro, visual noise

Excellent front camera images and video 46

Huawei P50 Pro, crop: noise is well controlled

Excellent front camera images and video 47

Bokeh

Huawei P40 Pro

Best: Huawei P40 Pro (75)

For these tests we switch to the camera’s bokeh or portrait mode and analyze depth estimation, bokeh shape, blur gradient, and repeatability, as well as all other general image quality attributes mentioned above. The score is derived from perceptual analysis of real-life images.

These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s bokeh mode performance in an outdoor scene.

Excellent front camera images and video 48

Google Pixel 6 Pro, no blur gradient, slight depth estimation artifacts

Excellent front camera images and video 49

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, blur gradient is applied, slight depth estimation artifacts

Excellent front camera images and video 50

Huawei P50 Pro, blur gradient is applied, slight depth estimation artifacts

Excellent front camera images and video 51

Flash

Huawei P40 Pro

Best: Huawei P40 Pro (93)

For these tests we switch to the camera’s bokeh or portrait mode and analyze depth estimation, bokeh shape, blur gradient, and repeatability, as well as all other general image quality attributes mentioned above. The score is derived from perceptual analysis of real-life images.

When shooting with the display flash, the details are generally low and more noise is visible than on the Huawei P50 Pro. These samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s flash performance.

Excellent front camera images and video 52

Google Pixel 6 Pro, noise, lack of detail, acceptable exposure and skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 53

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, underexposure, lack of detail, strong noise

Excellent front camera images and video 54

Huawei P50 Pro, lack of fine detail but better than the comparison devices, slightly bright exposure

Excellent front camera images and video 55

Artifacts

In these tests we check images for optical artifacts such as vignetting, flare, lens softness in the corners, distortion, and chromatic aberrations, as well as for processing artifacts such as ghosting and fusion errors, hue shift, and ringing.

Overall our testers observed few artifacts on the Pixel 6 Pro and in this respect, the Google phone does better than many of its competitors. In these samples you can see ghosting artifacts and white spots in low light.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, artifacts

Excellent front camera images and video 57

Google Pixel 6 Pro, crop: white spots

Google Pixel 6 Pro, artifacts

Excellent front camera images and video 59

Google Pixel 6 Pro, crop: ghosting can be visible

Video

In our Video tests we analyze the same image quality attributes as for still images, such as exposure, color, texture or noise, but we also include such temporal aspects as speed, and smoothness and stability of exposure, white balance, and autofocus transitions.

NOTE: The sample video clips in this section are best viewed at 4K resolution. 

The Google Pixel 6 Pro achieves a Selfie Video score of 95. A device’s overall Video score is derived from its performance and results across a range of attributes in the same way as the Photo score. In this section, we take a closer look at these sub-scores and compare video image quality against competitors.

Excellent front camera images and video 12

Exposure and Contrast

Huawei P50 Pro

Best: Huawei P50 Pro (90)

Video target exposure is generally accurate, even in low light. Dynamic range is fairly wide but not as wide as on the Apple iPhone 13 series. These video samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s video exposure performance in outdoor conditions.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, accurate target exposure on face, wide dynamic range

Apple iPhone 13, wider dynamic range, better shadow detail

Huawei P50 Pro, high contrast on face, shadow clipping
Excellent front camera images and video 17

Color

Google Pixel 6 Pro

Best: Google Pixel 6 Pro (100)

In video, the camera usually produces nice color and skin tones with a neutral white balance. These video samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s video color performance in an outdoor scene.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, neutral white balance, accurate skin tones

Apple iPhone 13, noticeable but acceptable yellow cast

Huawei P50 Pro, slight green white balance cast, inaccurate skin tones

Excellent front camera images and video 24

Focus

Huawei P50 Pro

Best: Huawei P50 Pro (97)

Depth of field is fairly wide. These video samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s video focus performance in an outdoor scene.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, all faces in focus, similar depth of field to iPhone 13

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, wide depth of field

Huawei P50 Pro, wider depth of field than comparison devices, all planes in focus

Excellent front camera images and video 31

Texture

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro

Best: Asus ZenFone 7 Pro (79)

This graph shows the measured video acutance for the Google Pixel 6 Pro.

Excellent front camera images and video 64

The Pixel 6 Pro’s acutance is generally high across all light levels.

These video samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s video texture performance under 1000 lux lighting conditions and at a subject distance of 55cm.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, good texture and detail

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, slightly less detail

Huawei P50 Pro, good texture and detail

Excellent front camera images and video 39

Noise

Huawei P40 Pro

Best: Huawei P40 Pro (90)

Noise is generally visible on Google Pixel 6 Pro video clips, especially in low light. The Huawei P50 Pro is able to output images with lower levels of noise in comparison. These video samples show the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s video noise performance in low light light conditions.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, coarse luminance noise

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, high level of noise but slightly lower than on Pixel 6 Pro

Huawei P50 Pro, lower noise

Excellent front camera images and video 55

Artifacts

Google Pixel 6 Pro

Best: Google Pixel 6 Pro (87)

For video artifacts, we check for the same kinds of artifacts mentioned in the Photo section, along with such video-specific artifacts as frame rate variation in different light conditions, judder effect, and moving artifacts (artifacts such as aliasing, color quantization, and flare can often be more intrusive when moving than in a still image).

Some unnatural rendering artifacts are sometimes visible due to over-sharpening. Hue shifts close to clipped areas can be visible as well. This sample clip was recorded in the lab at 1000 lux.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, hue shift close to clipped areas in bright lab conditions.

Excellent front camera images and video 67

Stabilization

In these tests we analyze residual motion when handholding the camera during recording, as well as when walking and running with the camera. We also look for stabilization artifacts such as jello effect, sharpness differences between frames, and frameshift (abrupt changes of framing).

Stabilization on the Google Pixel 6 Pro is generally effective, but some camera shake is still noticeable on faces when walking while recording. Overall the Pixel’s performance is quite similar to the P50 Pro. Both devices stabilize the background. In contrast, the iPhone 13 stabilizes the face and shows more camera shake. This sample clip shows the Google Pixel 6 Pro’s video stabilization in outdoor conditions.

Google Pixel 6 Pro, effective stabilization while walking

Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max, more motion than comparison devices

Huawei P50 Pro, effective stabilization while walking

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The Best Images from GuruShots “Beach Time” Challenge

The Best Images from GuruShots "Beach Time" Challenge

GuruShots is a photography site that hosts “The World’s Greatest Photo Game,” In their latest challenge, they invited participants to submit their best photos of “Beach Time.” There was such a great variety of seascapes and ideas incorporated into the challenge set. There were thousands of entires and millions of votes but the winners of the challenge were decided.  Check out the three winners as well as hundreds of top rated images below.

GuruShots is a  fantastic community for any photographer looking to share their work. They post a huge variety of different themed contests and offer a variety of prizes for the winners of each.

The Best Images from GuruShots "Beach Time" Challenge 68

Bruno Ricardo, Portugal – Top Photographer

The Best Images from GuruShots "Beach Time" Challenge 69

Mantas Kačinskas, Lithuania – Top Photo

The Best Images from GuruShots "Beach Time" Challenge 70

Rahat Bin Mustafiz, Bangladesh – Guru’s Top Pick

 

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Legendary Photos: The Stories Behind 5 of David Hume Kennerly’s Iconic Images

Photo of George Bush and Michelle Obama by David Hume Kennerly

Have you ever wondered about the stories behind some of the world’s most iconic images? Our new series “Legendary Photos,” features photographers from Canon’s Explorer’s of Light program, past and present, giving us behind-the-scenes insight on how they captured these unforgettable moments.

For the inaugural installment of Legendary Photos, Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist David Hume Kennerly shares the stories behind five of his powerful photos. Kennerly will be discussing his life in photography at a special free event this Thursday, November 4th at the Missouri School of Journalism.

The Hug

“The Hug” (above) was taken at the dedication of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016 when First Lady Michelle Obama hugged former President George W. Bush.

I immediately knew that the embrace was important. If I had taken it a fraction of a second before, after, or standing a foot in either direction I would have missed the moment. Another key element was Bush having his eyes closed for that magic instant, and it helped make the photo something special. The picture went viral as soon as I posted it online.

This photograph zeroes in on emotion and humanity. It shows two people whose mutual affection was both symbolic and heartfelt. Here you see an African American woman hugging a white man. A Democrat hugging a Republican. This is the kind of moment most of us would like to see more often, particularly these days.

The reason for the embrace was clear to me. Mrs. Obama was expressing gratitude for the role President Bush played in the formation of the African American museum. In 2003, he signed legislation creating the NMAAHC as part of the Smithsonian Institution, ensuring its home on the National Mall.

This image is the non-political and bi-partisan manifestation of people of all colors, sizes, shapes, and political parties getting together to celebrate the opening of the NMAAHC. It was an honor and privilege to witness it, and document it. I made this frame with the Canon EOS 5DS R using the Canon EF 100-400mm lens at 400mm.

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The Canon PowerShot PX Is A Smart Camera That Captures Its Own Images

The Canon PowerShot PX Is A Smart Camera That Captures Its Own Images

Canon has officially announced the Canon Powershot PX featuring subject detection and face recognition for capturing candid images.

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Canon PowerShot PX in Technology

PowerShot PX
 

If you’re a bit fed-up of being behind the camera instead of featuring in family shots, Canon may have the solution for you with the new PowerShot PX.

The Canon PowerShot PX is a smart camera that can be placed anywhere in the home to automatically capture 11.7MP images and 60p Full HD video. it also features facial recognition, auto-subject searching to keep people in-frame and uses voice commands. The 19-57mm lens can pan, tilt and zoom while offering a 340-degree (horizontal) field of view. Images are saved to a memory card and Wi-Fi along with USB-C charging is built-in. 

 

Powershot Px Available On Ios And Android 2d57e483a83f40edb333db501ce007ca |
 

Powershot Px Compatible With Web Cam Utility 741316c5eaf64a11a45c2402c395d013 |

 

Powershot Px Ambient Transfer Images And Videos 9d8b51e5eefa4b8c82537f6e220ce9da |
 

Accompanying the camera is the PowerShot PX iOS and Android app which acts as a scrapbook for your images or you can use it to manually control the camera.

The PowerShot PX, which we first got hands-on with at TPS 2021, will be available from November and will retail at £449.99.


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20 Impressive Images Captured with the New Nikon Z9

Photo shot with Nikon Z9

Nikon officially unveiled its new 45.7-megapixel Z9 this morning and, by specs alone, this new full-frame flagship mirrorless camera looks pretty impressive. (Read all about the Z9 in our news story here.) What’s also impressive are some of the early sample images shot with the Nikon Z9.

On the following pages we’ve included 20 of these Z9 test images, which have been supplied to Digital Photo Pro by Nikon USA. Since these Z9 photos have been provided by Nikon, they are obviously meant to show the Z9 in its best light. But these shots do give an indication of this fast-shooting camera’s talents for tracking action, achieving sharp focus, and capturing gorgeous, true-to-life color.

The Nikon Z9 is capable of shooting bursts of 30 frames per second (fps) for JPEG images, 20 fps for RAW files (with a 1000+ image buffer), and up to 120 fps at 11MP, all with full AF/AE. To achieve this lighting fast speed, Nikon did not install a mechanical shutter in the Z 9, going completely with an electronic shutter.

Photo of Nikon Z9 shooting

“This means actions like a fast-moving golf swing that would typically distort the club can be captured confidently with the electronic shutter, even at 1/32,000 second,” Nikon said. “It also allows users to shoot massive quantities of silent frames without worrying about shutter wear or breakdown.”

A new subject detection algorithm in the Nikon Z9’s autofocus system allows the camera to detect “the world’s largest range of nine subject types” including humans, pets, birds, airplanes, trains, cars, motorbikes and bicycles. When in Auto-Area AF, any of these subjects will automatically be detected and focused on, without the need to change settings. The Z9’s new AF system also uses 3D-tracking, which had only been previously available on Nikon’s DSLRs.

You can pre-order the Nikon Z9 at B&H for $5496 here.

Photo shot with Nikon Z9
Photo captured with new Nikon Z9. Image provided by Nikon USA.
Photo captured with new Nikon Z9. Image provided by Nikon USA.
Photo captured with new Nikon Z9. Image provided by Nikon USA.
Photo shot with Nikon Z9
Photo captured with new Nikon Z9. Image provided by Nikon USA.
Photo shot with Nikon Z9
Photo captured with new Nikon Z9. Image provided by Nikon USA.
Photo shot with Nikon Z9
Photo captured with new Nikon Z9. Image provided by Nikon USA.

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