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Meet Punks 2.0 – 3 Legged Thing’s Updated Range Of Entry-Level Tripods

Meet Punks 2.0 - 3 Legged Thing's Updated Range Of Entry-Level Tripods

– Partner Content –

Brian 7621 | 1/125 sec | f/3.2 | 135.0 mm | ISO 640

 

3 Legged Thing’s popular Punks range twist-lock tripods have undergone a transformation making Corey, Travis, Billy and Brian the most versatile Punks ever.

Like the Legends Range and Pro Range 2.0 counterparts, the new Punks 2.0 tripods all now boast three detachable legs, enabling conversion to monopods or booms, and with the addition of optional Vanz tripod feet (sold separately) can be made into tabletop tripods. Plus, all four tripods are available in two refreshed colour options and come with an Airhed Neo 2.0 ballhead which has also been refined. 

3 Legged Thing Punks 2.0 Key Features:

  • Three detachable legs so they can be converted into a monopod or boom 
  • Can be converted to a tabletop tripod by detaching the legs and adding Vanz tripod feet (sold separately)
  • Twist-Lock style tripods with anti-rotation shims 
  • 23, 55 and 80-degree leg-angles 
  • Refined leg locks with improved grip
  • Integrated 1/4″-20 thread for attaching an accessory arm 
  • D-Ring for adding weight for extra stability
  • AirHed Neo 2.0 ballhead
  • Two colour options

 

To see why the new Punks 2.0 tripod range from 3 Legged Thing could be for you, we’re talking through the 5 top features these entry-level tripods have to offer. 

 

Billy 6968 | 1/250 sec | f/2.8 | 200.0 mm | ISO 160
 

 

1. Redesigned Leg Locks For Improved Grip

Each of the Punks 2.0 tripods have chunkier leg locks that have a new external design that combines rubber pads and knurling for improved grip and leverage, even in wet conditions, ensuring the legs can be tightened securely in place. Weight has also been added to the leg locks, lowering the tripods’ centre of gravity which provides more stability. 

Punks 2.0 tripods now feature anti-rotation Chicken Lips (shims) which you may have seen on 3LT’s Pro Range 2.0 and Legends tripods that use a single shim and legs with two internal key lines. This prevents the leg tubing from accidental rotation, which in turn enables stronger locking and greater rigidity.

 

“It’s particularly exciting that our entire catalogue of twist lock tripods will now have 3 detachable legs, which gives them a level of versatility above many of their peers. I’m sure photographers will love working with them out and about, working at home or in the studio,” said Stuart Boston, 3LT’s Chief Operations Officer.

 

2. Create A Table-Top Tripod

Billy 2.0, Brian 2.0, Corey 2.0 and Travis 2.0 feature 3 detachable legs, that enable conversion to a table-top tripod using 3LT’s Vanz tripod footwear (sold separately). The legs can also be combined with the tripod’s centre column for use as a monopod or boom arm.

BILLYBLUE2 | 1/125 sec | f/18.0 | 52.0 mm | ISO 64

 

3. Accessories Can be Added

3 Legged Thing’s patented Tri-mount plate on top of the centre column has been refined with a new design so you can attach accessories or use it for cable management. With the help of the 1/4″-20 thread, you can attach an accessory arm in order to mount a light or monitor to the tripod – ideal for when shooting video as well as stills. 

COREYBLUE2 | 1/125 sec | f/18.0 | 52.0 mm | ISO 64
 

4. Construction You Can Depend On

Corey and Travis 2.0’s legs and column are formed from aerospace-grade magnesium alloy, whilst the legs and column of Billy and Brian 2.0 are made from eight layers of 100% pure carbon fibre with aerospace-grade magnesium alloy hardware.

 

Corey 6781 | 1/200 sec | f/2.8 | 48.0 mm | ISO 1250
 

5. New Stylish Colour Options

All four tripods are available in two new colour options (who wants just a boring black tripod?) – Blue with blue ball head and blue accents, and Black with black ball head and copper accents.

Plus, after a number of customer requests, 3 Legged Thing has created a stylish new protective bag for the new Punks 2.0 tripods. The new, padded, clamshell-style carry bags feature a detachable, extendable carry strap, and an external pocket that’s ideal for accessories including 3LT’s alternative tripod feet (sold separately). The bag also has a built-in carabiner that allows the bag to be attached to the tripod D-ring to add extra weight.

As we’ve come to expect from 3 Legged Thing, the packaging the Punks 2.0 tripods arrive in is also super-cool. It was designed by 3LT Design Wizard Diana Meraz and features Punk dinosaurs as well as some new #3LTBoxGags.

BILLYBLUE2 | 1/125 sec | f/18.0 | 48.0 mm | ISO 64
 

Which Tripod From the Punks 2.0 Range Is For Me?

Corey 2.0 is an ultra-compact travel tripod, ideal for photographers who need stability in a travel-friendly package but if you need extra height, then you should opt for the Brian 2.0 carbon fibre travel tripod.

Travis 2.0 is the perfect general use tripod that is suitable for a variety of different photography genres as is Billy 2.0 which shares the same structure as Travis, but Billy is lighter thanks to its carbon fibre construction.

  • Billy 2.0 – Compact, carbon fibre, general use tripod that is light enough for travel and built to withstand the rigours of everyday use. Billy 2.0 is designed for all types of photography. Billy 2.0 has a load capacity of 18KG and features 4 section legs/1 section column.
  • Brian 2.0 – Compact, carbon fibre, travel tripod capable of reaching great heights provides remarkable stability and rigidity whilst remaining lightweight. Brian 2.0 has a load capacity of 14KG and features 5 section legs/2 section column. 
  • Corey 2.0 – Ultra-compact, magnesium, alloy, travel tripod for photographers who need a tripod small enough to pack into carry-on luggage. Corey 2.0 has a payload of 14KG and features 5 section legs/2 section column. 
  • Travis 2.0 – Compact, magnesium, alloy, general use tripod that is ideal for beginners and students. Travis 2.0 is perfect for those wanting a more versatile tripod for a wide variety of photographic genres. Travis 2.0 has a load capacity of 18KG and features 4 section legs/1 section column.

When Can I Purchase A Punks 2.0 Tripod & How Much Are They? 

Punks 2.0 are available for pre-order immediately at 3LeggedThing.com and selected retailers, with stock expected in stores from 25 October 2021 onwards. 

The Punks 2.0 tripods are priced at: 

  • COREY 2.0 – £199.99
  • TRAVIS 2.0 – £199.99
  • BILLY 2.0 – £289.99
  • BRIAN 2.0 – £299.99

Shop The Punks 2.0 Range

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Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond’s ‘No Time To Die’

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die'

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 1

Nicola Dove shares what it is like to be the official photographer for major feature films, specifically for the new James Bond movie, No Time To Die.

For many, this might sound like a dream job: working with famous actors and on amazing locations, shooting incredible stories, and having work seen all over the world. That is exactly what Dove, a film stills photographer originally from New Zealand, experiences in her job, but it’s not as effortless as it sounds.

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 2
Nicola Dove

To put it simply, the job of a stills photographer is to gather the best photography that represents the story. This way, the images honor everyone’s hard work on the set and hopefully draws people in to watch the film, explains Dove.

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 3Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 4Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 5

Having shot on the set of the recently released James Bond: No Time to Die for seven months, Dove tells PetaPixel that “it takes a high level of understanding and cooperation amongst the crew, the different departments, to shoot at such intensity for so long, but just knowing that everyone on a Bond film is at the top of their game is inspiring.”

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 6Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 7

This type of photography work comes with long hours and physically challenging environments but no two days are ever the same.

“I’ve shot in Venetian palaces, Moroccan markets, Cuban streets, Parisian cafes, New Zealand mountains, and at many incredible studio set builds including the famous 007 stage in Pinewood London,” says Dove.

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 8Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 9Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 10

Shooting stills for major feature films also requires a sense of ninja-like skills to keep out the way while being on top of the game with nerves of steel. Such was the case when shooting Daniel Craig walking towards the camera after parking an Aston Martin.

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 11

Although on paper it was a simple scene, it was all the elements — the elegant suit, the sunglasses, the watch, the car, the right light, and the few extra steps Craig took towards the camera — that made the image come together. That afternoon, the final image was set out from the set as the “first look” image from the film.

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 12

“It’s about knowing where to be when, and when to make yourself scarce. I say my job is part photographer, part ninja, part psychologist. It’s fascinating,” Dove says.

Working so intensively with a crew for prolonged periods of time can also feel bittersweet when filming is finished. Dove explains that although she was looking forward to a rest when No Time to Die concluded, she knew that she will miss everyone and the buzz from being involved in such an exhilarating project.

Meet the Woman Behind the Photos for James Bond's 'No Time To Die' 13

“Knowing it was Daniel Craig’s last day of his last Bond film heightened the emotions for everyone — we all knew it was the end of an era. Personally, it felt like an accomplishment to end really well, still attempting to make great shots right to the end,” she recalls.

Dove’s experience of almost 20 years in the field has also led her to open Film Stills Academy, an online education hub that helps other photographers learn about this type of work by demystifying the role and fast-track their prospects in the industry through coaching.

More of Dove’s work can be found on her website and Instagram page.


Image credits: All images provided courtesy of Nicola Dove and used with permission.

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Canon Says it Can’t Meet Demand for the R3 or Any of its New Lenses

Canon Says it Can't Meet Demand for the R3 or Any of its New Lenses

Canon Says it Can't Meet Demand for the R3 or Any of its New Lenses 14

Canon has expanded its list of products that are in short supply to encompass both lenses it revealed this week and the newly-announced EOS R3.

In a notice spotted by by Canon Rumors, Canon Japan has published an apology that now includes seventeen total products that “received more orders than expected” and will be in short supply globally. Below is the notice that was published on Canon’s Japanese website, translated into English:

We have received more orders than expected for each of the following products, and it will take some time before delivery.

We thank you for your many orders and apologize for any inconvenience caused to our customers. Thank you kindly look forward for your understanding.

The notice was originally published in July and included several new lenses but was updated this week to include the EOS R3, the RF100-400mm f/5.6-8, and the RF16mm f/2.8 STM — the major products announced during the EOS R3 reveal. The list also includes the new accessories that were developed specifically for Canon’s redesigned hot shoe found on the R3.

Below is the full list of products that are listed as taking some time before delivery:

The new products like Canon’s super telephoto or wide-angle 16mm are currently listed as ready to ship on October 14. However, given this announcement from Canon Japan, it is very unlikely that customers can expect the product to ship out to everyone on that date.

The silicon shortage brought on by the coronavirus pandemic has affected the production of electronics across the board, ranging from automobiles to computers. While Sony, Nikon, and Canon have all released some kind of apology or notice about the scarcity of new product availability, none have specifically attributed it to the low supply of parts, however. Instead, most of the public notices published by camera manufacturers cite greater demand than was anticipated.

It is unclear how long it will be before manufacturers are able to ramp production back to pre-pandemic levels.

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Street Photography – meet the GuruShots winners

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners

We showcase the top-rated images sent in by GuruShots members on the theme of ‘Street Photography.’ For more inspiring challenges to improve your skills and stay motivated, see here.


Top photographer

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 15

Ronald Bottlender, Germany

Top photo

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 16

Michal Vaněk, Czechia

Guru’s Top Pick

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 17

Prathap Gangireddy, India


Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 18

Xavierjouve, France

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 19

Roberto Gomes, Portugal

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 20

Guy Wilson, Israel

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 21

Anmut, France

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 22

Victor Vascul, Germany

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 23

Isak Venter, South Africa

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 24

Colette van Eck, Netherlands

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 25

Geoff. Australia

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 26

Gabriele Pedrazzi, Italy

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 27

Leonard Yanovsky, United States

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 28

Canan Ağartan, Turkey

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 29

Pedro Garcia, United States

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 30

Bruno Couleau, France

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 31

Porrun Huh, Namibia

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 32

Ivan Heidrick, Mozambique

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 33

Kobus Lubbe, France

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 34

Horst Winkler, Austria

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 35

Amit Erez, Israel

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 36

Viveka Gustavson, Sweden

Street Photography - meet the GuruShots winners 37

Roey Nitzani, Israel 


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New documentary on Picture Post – we meet the director

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director

Picture Stories, a new documentary celebrating the life and legacy of the hugely influential Picture Post magazine, is about to be released. The director, Rob West of Ship of Life films, explains how it all came about


“This is my first documentary film and it’s been a long gestation,” Rob explains. “I had been aware of Picture Post for years, and knew the brother of its celebrated editor, Tom Hopkinson. I soon realised how little had been done about the magazine and its photographers over the last 20 or 30 years, however. This piqued my curiosity and I decided to do a documentary on Picture Post, looking at it through the eyes of modern day photographers and examining how it had influenced them.

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 38

Rob West, who directed Picture Stories

Rob began by approaching Getty Images who own the archive and rights to much the legacy. “They were very enthusiastic about the project,” says Rob. “Tens of thousands of different stories were in the archive, many of which were ever published, so it was a huge, rich depository. In the movie, we tried to capture the breadth of that work, showing how it also focussed on ordinary life – today what might be called documentary/street, as opposed to the war photography.

We wanted to explore the idea that under the founding editor, Stefan Lorant, the magazine showed ordinary people as they were, unposed, while also exposing social conditions in Britain. So the revolution in Picture Post’s photographic approach was also supporting a political agenda – it’s this coming together that makes the magazine so interesting.”

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 39

Stefan Lorant (1901 – 1997) editor of Picture Post, discusses the forthcoming issue of the magazine with Tom Hopkinson (1906 – 1986), assistant editor (left).

Picture Stories includes some of the last surviving people to have been involved in Picture Post. “I contacted as many people as I could,” Rob explains. “One contact led to another and so on. It’s been a continuous process and I am still learning, as there is such a richness of material.”

Hardy and his contemporaries
Bert Hardy is the photographer most strongly associated with Picture Post, but as Rob is keen to stress, there were many other fine contributors on its books. “We tried to create a bit more of a balance, so we also give prominence to Kurt Hutton, who really captured the magazine’s ethos and spirit, and Humphrey Spender, who’d come the from the Mass Observation project.

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 40

One of Bert Hardy’s most famous images, showing two boys in the deprived Gorbals area of Glasgow. Originally published in  1948

Then you have Haywood Magee, the archetypical Picture Post photographer, whose work is best seen as complete photo stories rather than single striking images, and of course, Thurston Hopkins… There were are some really prominent women photographers too, notably Grace Robertson.”

As Rob notes, Picture Post had a strong influence on later photographers, including Don McCullin – who recalls how reading copies in the barbers was a big part of his photographic education – and Daniel Meadows. “There is clearly a continuous thread from Picture Post to later photographers who were trying to capture life on the streets.”

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 41

22nd January 1955: A trio of Jamaican immigrants walking the streets of Birmingham.

Era-defining
While Covid-19 has made life tough for street and documentary photographers, Rob reminds us that things were even more difficult for the publishers of Picture Post during the war. “When Stefan Lorant left for the US owing to problems with immigration, Tom Hopkinson took over as editor. Unlike Lorant, he was very much from the English establishment, but he worked very closely with him from the outset and learned a lot about laying out a picture story and how pictures and text work together.

With Stefan gone and Kurt Hutton interned, Picture Post had to use home-grown photographers much more. It was quite a difficult adjustment but they carried on the traditions very effectively – they were also working in tough conditions during the war, with bombs falling, paper scarce etc. Hopkinson often had to fight with the censors to get images published too, a battle he didn’t always win.”

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 42

1942: A newsagent’s shop in Coventry selling Picture Post. Photo by Haywood Magee/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Classic covers
Rob reckons several factors caused Picture Post’s closure in 1957. “There are different interpretations. TV took people’s attention away more, along with the advertising, so it became harder to make the magazine profitable.

There was the rise of Sunday colour supplements, too. In addition, the magazine lost its way editorially, particularly after Hopkinson left over a disagreement about some particularly shocking images from the Korean war. Bert Hardy said it became a ‘girlie’ magazine, and while that is not entirely fair, it did lose both editorial direction and a sense of social purpose.

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 43

An iconic cover from February 25, 1950

Many of the things had been fighting for, such as the NHS, came to pass. That said, the decision to close the title came quite suddenly and it could have carried on under a different proprietor.”

So what is Rob’s favourite Picture Post cover? “It’s hard to say, but Bert Hardy’s image of fishwives chatting in Hull is classic Picture Post. It captures so much about what the magazine was trying to do, showing ordinary people living ordinary lives. I also like as it’s part of a picture story, not just a glamour shot without much context.”

New documentary on Picture Post - we meet the director 44

3rd February 1951: Four fishwives gather for a chat in the English fishing port of Hull.

Picture Stories is available for digital download from September 30th and UK screenings start from September 15th, including a showing at The Photography Show. More info can be found at picturestoriesfilm.com 


Who were Picture Post’s most famous photographers?

* Bert Hardy (1913-1995)
Hardy is forever associated with Picture Post, having joined the magazine in 1941. One of seven children, he become involved with photography while working for a chemist and first came to attention with his shots of George V and Queen Mary in the 1930s. Hardy gave up photography in 1964 to become a farmer, but was widely celebrated in later life.
* Thurston Hopkins (1913-2014)
Raised in a more middle class background than Hardy, Hopkins was also a self-taught photographer, and a committed Leica user. He was so keen to join Picture Post he put together a dummy issue, using his own photographs, which got him hired as a freelancer.
* Humphrey Spender (1910-2005)
Spender was of Anglo-German ancestry and was given his first camera as a child. He had quite a strong career in photography before joining Picture Post and had a lucky escape when he bumped into SS head Heinrich Himmler in an Austrian hotel in 1944 – Spender was secretly working for the British army at the time,
* Kurt Hutton (1893-1960)
Born in Germany, Hutton migrated to England in 1934 and was one of the founding staff members of Picture Post. One of his most famous images shows some girls enjoying themselves at an Essex funfair in 1938,
* Grace Robertson (1930-2021)
Robertson’s first photo project appeared in Picture Post in 1951 – her father also worked for the magazine. Although usually given ‘women’s subjects’ to photograph for Picture Post she made a solid and long-lasting contribution to photojournalism.


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Canon Can’t Meet the Demand for RF Lenses

Canon Can't Meet the Demand for RF Lenses

Canon recently released a list of RF lenses that it cannot meet the demand for. Is this simply poor planning or a clear sign that its new lenses are exceeding expectations?

A few days back Canon Japan published a list of RF lenses that the company is unable to meet the demand for. These lenses include:

In its statement, Canon Japan said that orders had exceeded expectations and apologized for any inconvenience. You can see the statement in full here.

When I saw this statement I couldn’t help thinking back to my own experiences when I bought the Canon EOS R5 and some RF lenses, including the Canon RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1L IS USM listed above. From the date of order, it took almost four months until I’d received everything. Naturally, I put a lot of that down to the chaos caused to supply chains and so forth, but even so, I was still a little bewildered that Canon would go on such a huge, global marketing blitz as it did with the new EOS R5 and other RF lenses if it knew it couldn’t supply customers with their newly paid for gear. Conversely, perhaps they hadn’t expected such a big demand for their new cameras and RF mount lenses. If that was the case, their sales and marketing department needed a serious overhaul, I thought.

Yet here we are, almost a year on, and Canon is still saying that demand has exceeded expectations and supply is thin as a result. Whatever way you spin it, I think it’s really poor business acumen by Canon. Great that demand is high, sure, but quite embarrassing for a global company such as Canon to admit it has a severe shortage of a number of newly released and highly spruiked products.

What are your thoughts? 

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Meet Canon’s new pro-grade wide-angle zoom lens

Canon RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS Lens on white background

Canon’s RF 15-35mm f/2.8 L IS is a beautiful lens. It also weighs more than 1.8 pounds and costs $2,299 retail, which makes it overkill for some shooters. Now, Canon has added the RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS to its lineup to provide a smaller, lighter, and cheaper (relatively speaking) option for folks seeking a high-quality wide-angle zoom.

Inside the Canon RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS lens

There are 16 glass elements arranged into 12 groups inside Canon’s new 1.2-pound super-wide zoom. That makes it more than a half-pound lighter than the five-inch-long RF 15-35mm f/2.8 L, which checks in around 1.85 pounds. So, while the 14-35mm f/4 L still isn’t tiny, it does offer a considerable weight reduction. It’s also an inch shorter than its bigger sibling. 

Canon RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS Lens on white background
The front element doesn’t bulge out beyond the barrel. Canon

The glass includes three ultra-low dispersion elements and three aspherical elements to help navigate the complicated light pattern required to create an image this wide without brutal distortion. It also offers Canon’s high-end Sub-wavelength Structure Coating and the Air Sphere Coating to cut down on flare and ghosting. 

Lens design

Lenses that go as wide as 14mm typically employ rounded front elements that bulge out. That makes it impossible to use front-mounted filters because there’s just not enough room for the glass. The new RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS has a curved front element that doesn’t stick out past the lens barrel, which means it can accept standard 77mm screw-on filters. While not everyone still uses optical filters, it’s important for landscape photographers who rely on circular polarizers and video shooters who need neutral density glass to keep their shutter speeds in check. 

Canon’s new ultra-wide zoom focuses down to just 7.9-inches away from your subject throughout the zoom range. At 35mm, that offers a 0.38x magnification, which means you can get impressively close and still get sharp focus. 

Canon RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS Lens on white background
It’s just under four inches long. Canon

The lens itself promises 5.5 stops of image stabilization, but when paired with the R5 or R6 bodies, it can get a total of 7 stops worth of shake reduction. It obviously depends on the shooting situation and how steady your hands are, but that’s serious steadying. 

Because it’s an L lens, Canon has also baked in the ruggedization and weatherproofing you’d expect from a pro lens

When can you buy the Canon RF 14-35mm f/4 L IS lens?

You’ll start seeing Canon’s new wide-angle zoom on store shelves in August. It will come with a retail price of $1,699, which is a considerable discount compared to the $2,299 RF 15-35mm f/2.8 L IS. Of course, if you’re willing to adapt an older EF mount lens, your options open up considerably to include first-party options like the venerably EF 17-40mm f/4 and the older versions of the EF 16-35mm f/2.8. Of course, if you really want to go super-wide, you can opt for the $3,000 Canon EF 11-24mm f/L USM. Any wider than that and you’ll land firmly in fisheye territory.

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Nikon Warns That It Doesn’t Have Enough Supply to Meet Z fc Demand

Nikon Warns That It Doesn't Have Enough Supply to Meet Z fc Demand

Nikon Warns That It Doesn't Have Enough Supply to Meet Z fc Demand 45

Nikon Japan has issued a notice stating that demand for the newly announced Z fc camera currently outpace the company’s production capability. Those who have pre-ordered the camera are likely going to have to wait “some time” before they receive it.

The Nikon Z fc was expected to ship to pre-order customers and be available for general purchase sometime in late July, but according to Nikon Japan — as spotted by Nikon Rumors— it is likely that a good number of those who hoped to have it in hand in that time frame will be disappointed.

Thank you for your continued patronage of Nikon products.

We have received a large number of reservations for the “Z fc” and “Z fc 28mm f / 2.8 Special Edition Kits” scheduled to be released in late July 2021.

For some customers who are currently making reservations, it may take some time before the product is delivered.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused to customers who are waiting for our products.
We will do our utmost to deliver the product as soon as possible, and we appreciate your understanding.

Whether this issue was caused by greater demand than Nikon originally anticipated or if the demand simply outpaces the company’s current production capacity is unknown.

Nikon Warns That It Doesn't Have Enough Supply to Meet Z fc Demand 46

This delay should not come as a surprise as Nikon has struggled with supply issues for the last year and the global silicon shortage continues to wreak havoc on the technology sector. Stock of the Z7 II has been low since it was announced in October of 2020, and the camera is still nearly impossible to find on store shelves (Amazon says buyers should expect a delay of one to two months before new orders for the Z7 II can be fulfilled). Dealers have been sending out what products they receive as soon as stock arrives, and it is rare to see the camera listed for immediate availability anywhere. In May, Nikon DX DSLRs and lenses weren’t being restocked and some were even being discontinued.

Earlier this year, Nikon warned that production volume may dip as Japan entered yet another wave of coronavirus infections, which certainly did not help Nikon catch up on backorders.

Nikon Warns That It Doesn't Have Enough Supply to Meet Z fc Demand 47

Considering it has been nine months since the Z7 II was announced and stock of the camera is still low, the popularity of the Nikon Z fc may mean that it will be a long time until the camera will be delivered to everyone who pre-ordered it, and even longer before those who did not can find it on store shelves.

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Incredible Architecture – Meet the GuruShots winners

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners

Advertising Feature

We showcase the top-rated images sent in by GuruShots members on the theme of ‘Incredible Architecture.’ For more inspiring challenges to improve your skills and stay motivated, see here.


Top photographer

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 48

Abhishek kehsihbA, India

Top photo 

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 49

Koen Victor, Belgium

Guru’s Top Pick

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 50

Luis Vargues, Portugal


Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 51

Jurgen Bauwens, Belgium

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 52

Xavier@xavierjouve, Team X, France

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 53

Eva Wiedeman, Cape Verde

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 54

Gigi Cioffi Spanola, USA

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 55

Fateen Younis, UK

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 56

Erik Ersson, Sweden

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 57

Ańa Ligier, Ireland

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 58

hodgepodge_jane, Ireland

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 59

Guy Wilson, Israel

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 60

Tim Hall, Portugal

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 61

Rastislav Kašper, Slovakia

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 62

M4RCO, France

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 63

Bernard VAN DE VEN, Netherlands

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 64

Martin Nadymáček, Czechia

Incredible Architecture - Meet the GuruShots winners 65

Alex Torres, USA

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Meet The Man Who Fearlessly Flies Drones Into Volcanoes

Meet The Man Who Fearlessly Flies Drones Into Volcanoes

Stefan Forster
Stefan Forster

Stefan Forster recently caught our eye with his stunning drone video of an erupting volcano in Iceland. The 32-year-old Swiss native shot the video using flying skills honed over the past eight years, though his interest in nature and landscape photography goes back even further. Digital Trends caught up with Forster to find out more about his work and how he creates his extraordinary drone videos.

What was your first-ever drone and how were your early flights?

My first drone was a DJI S1000 [professional octocopter], but my initial problem was getting my Nikon D800 to work with it as at that time the S1000 only supported Panasonic, Sony, and Canon cameras. So I went to the University of Zurich to find some guys who would help me build a remote controller for my Nikon.

To get the setup working, I had to spend over $35,000 for special gimbals, remotes, working hours, image transitions, and so on. So you can imagine that on my first flights I had a pulse of 150 and was very afraid of crashing; there were no collision avoidance sensors then.

Another problem was that the self-made gimbal and remote frequently broke down, and so I had to spend a lot of money on replacements and work by specialists. So while my first drone was the most expensive one in terms of investment, I did learn so much during this period.

As for crashes, the first one happened when I ran out of battery power, and it came down like a rock. The first drones didn’t include this nice graphic showing the battery percentage. So I only saw the voltage of the battery, and to interpret it correctly, you also have to consider the wind speed, temperature, and so on. After the third crash — also due to battery power — I started flying with smaller drones.

How often did you practice at the start, and how long did it take to become a competent pilot?

I practiced a lot. I flew around 150 hours until I took my drone with me to a project for the first time. The big drones were very nice to fly as they were rock solid in the air.

If you could travel back in time and give yourself one drone-related tip, what would it be?

I guess I would tell myself to wait another three years before buying the first drone. If I had started later, I would have saved so much money, time, and pain. You can’t imagine how expensive it was in the very beginning to ship a 25,000 mAh battery to Iceland. About 650 euros for the shipping alone. A new battery cost around 1,000 euros, too.

What drone kit do you travel with when you go on a shoot?

I’m only shooting with the Mavic series. Depending on the duration and mileage of the hike, I take the Mavic 2 Pro with me or the Mini 2. It also depends on the local rules. The quality of the camera is of course not comparable to the Inspire 2 with the X7 camera, but you know, the best camera is the one you have with you. So my clients, such as BBC, Google Android, BMW, and Hisense, don’t care about which camera I use. They only need 4K content and the best possible exposure and quality. What counts most is the subject of the footage.

Meet The Man Who Fearlessly Flies Drones Into Volcanoes 71Above: A still from Stefan Forster’s Swiss Peaks video.

What single thing could DJI do to improve the next iteration of the Mavic Pro?

The quality of the picture from the Hasselblad lens [on the Mavic 2 Pro] is not worth this great name. I have eight Mavic 2 Pro drones, and half of them have unsharp edges and corners, some even a third of the whole image. So I guess DJI should make the camera of the Pro drone more professional. I always say they should make their drones a bit more expensive and invest the extra money in better optics.

Here’s my wish list for a new Mavic 3 Pro:

– Higher resolution such as 5.6K or 8K 24/25/30P
– 4K 60 frames-per-second mode
– Better optics (30mm focal length)
– Faster speed for improved wind resistance
– New smart controller with O3 support

What was the greatest challenge you faced when making your recent volcano video (below) in Iceland? 

Simply, the local rules for those visiting the area. The police closed the volcano many times because of the potentially dangerous gases that it was emitting. Also, the strong wind and bad weather made flying the drone difficult.

Many people watching your volcano video may wonder how close you were to the lava flows. Were you in danger at any point?

I was always sitting right at the lava border, only about 100 to 300 meters from the volcano. One day the lava stream did come directly to the border. It was way hotter than I could ever have expected. Extremely hot. But I wasn’t in any danger. I always had my gas mask and gasometer with me.

Did you lose, or almost lose, your drone in the extreme conditions?

There was this one tight situation where the wind was extreme, blowing at around 80 kph [50 mph] at an altitude of 50 meters. To get the drone back, I needed to fly it in the wind shadow of the volcano. I needed around 45% of battery for only 300 meters of distance. I also had a drone that melted quite a bit during flights very close to the volcano. I had planned to sacrifice it at the end of my volcano tour by flying it directly into the lava fountain, but it survived. So now I keep this drone as my trophy.

To what extent did you tweak the look of the footage?

I record in H.265 10-bit DLog-M and edit using DaVinci Resolve software. Such footage cannot really be tweaked a lot because the sensor only records in 100 Mbps and there is simply not much data in the files. So besides contrast and some grad filters, I didn’t adjust the footage at all.

Another of your videos, Greenland – Land of Ice (below), has clocked up more than 10 million views since its release in 2018. It’s an extraordinary piece of work. How did you prepare the shoot?

First, I want to say that I travel to those very special places as part of my work guiding other photographers, and I have the chance to charter ships, planes, and boats especially for my group. This is very important for trips to Greenland as most places are extremely remote.

So my main business is being a tour operator and guide. I only fly my drone or use my camera when everyone in the tour group is happy and no longer needs my help. So I took this footage on four different charter tours to Greenland. I always say, “The more you go to a place, the better the chance of getting extraordinary shots.” For the other films that I have on YouTube, I wrote a plan for most of the shots so that they fit together. But nature’s light and mood you can’t plan.

You clearly put as much effort into the editing as you do into the actual drone shoot — which part of the process do you enjoy the most, the shooting or postproduction?

I really like being outside the most. I’m an outdoor guy. Being inside is always a pain for me. If I wasn’t a photographer and videographer, I would be a forest worker or something like that. So everything I do on the computer is just because I need to.

Meet The Man Who Fearlessly Flies Drones Into Volcanoes 72
Stefan Forster

Are you able to make a living out of your video and photography efforts?

Yes, I’m a professional photographer and run a photography school and travel agency for photography tours. Due to the pandemic, my travel agency and photography school is suffering, so I invested all my energy and power in aerial cinematography thanks to agencies like Shutterstock, Getty, and so on.

What’s the hardest part about trying to make a living out of drone photography?

My income comes from many different parts. The biggest part comes from my travel agency and my photography school in Switzerland. All the rest comes from slideshows, photography, and footage sales, books, calendars, and so on.

But I can tell you that it’s very hard today to sell photographs and footage as there are so many talented photographers and filmmakers out there who give everything away for free only to get a credit at the end of the production. But on the day they want to turn professional and start making a living out of selling their art, they realize that they’ve destroyed the market by giving away everything for free or at a very cheap price.

Many people buy a drone, fly it a few times, and then don’t know what to do with it. Can you give any tips for how to stay inspired and motivated when it comes to flying a drone?

Hmm, that’s a difficult question. To be honest, I think if everyone who owns a drone is flying it as often and as intensively as I do, drones will be prohibited within a couple of years. I guess with the new drone regulations coming in Europe and also the rest of the world, flying drones will be more and more complicated, and especially as a professional, you need to spend days with obtaining very expensive permits.

So my tip is: When you fly, please don’t break the law, and don’t provoke anger in other people who want to enjoy the silence of the nature. My personal rule is that I only fly in places where I can’t disturb anyone else.

Can you share anything about other drone projects that you have in the pipeline?

A huge project that I’m currently working on is a book and a slideshow called The World From Above. I want to visit so many places where I have seen stunning textures and colors from the satellite image. So the next project is to make the first book from my aerial images. I guess I also have to hurry a bit because drones are getting banned in more and more places.

How can people find out more about your work or follow you online?

On my website, as well as on YouTube and Instagram.

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