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The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster

October 13, 2021

Andy Westlake puts the Canon EOS R3 and its Eye control AF through its paces with a day shooting high-speed motorsport

All the sample images in this article were shot using a pre-production beta model of the Canon EOS R3, and may not reflect final image quality. They’re out-of-camera JPEGs edited ‘to taste’, including cropping, brightness, contrast, and saturation adjustments, etc. 

Canon EOS R3 fitted with the RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM lens

Canon’s latest mirrorless model, the EOS R3, is designed for shooting high-speed sports and action

Canon EOS R3 at a glance:

  • £5,879 body only
  • 24MP full-frame stacked CMOS sensor
  • 30 frames per second shooting
  • 1/64,000 sec top shutter speed
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilisation
  • AI-based subject recognition AF
  • Eye control AF

I’ve been lucky enough to test some remarkable cameras this year. Early on there was Sony’s phenomenal Alpha 1, which can shoot 50MP images at 30 frames per second. Then there was the superb Fujifilm GFX100S, whose 102MP medium-format sensor makes it a landscape photographer’s dream. But when Canon offered me the chance to try out a beta sample of its new EOS R3, I got an extra shiver of excitement.

Because while this high-speed, pro-spec sports and action camera may ‘only’ be capable of shooting 24MP images at 30fps, it’s got some really exciting new features of its own. Most importantly, it’s got Eye control AF. This means it can detect what you’re looking at in the viewfinder and focus on it.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 1

The EOS R3 can be set to focus on whatever you’re looking at in the viewfinder

At this point, Canon fans who know their history will be muttering under their breath that I’ve got it all wrong, and eye control isn’t actually new. On one level, they’re absolutely right, as the firm first introduced this futuristic-sounding technology almost 30 years ago, on the EOS 5 in 1992.

Canon then went on to use it in several more 35mm SLRs during the 1990s, including the mid-range EOS 50E and, most notably, the high-end EOS 3 in 1998. As it happens, I used these two cameras for the majority of my film photography, and still own both. This is exactly why I’m so excited by the EOS R3.

What is Eye control AF?

Eye control AF is, at heart, a simple idea. The camera uses an array of low-power infrared LEDs to illuminate your eye and determine whereabouts you’re looking in the viewfinder. Back in the film days, this was simply a method of selecting your autofocus point, and on the EOS 50E which only had three to choose between, it worked perfectly. With the EOS 3’s 45-point system I found it rather less reliable, but I still used it all the time, as it was quicker and more intuitive than the alternative of pressing a button and spinning control dials.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 2

Canon previously used Eye control AF on several 35mm film SLRs, most famously the semi-pro EOS 3 (left)

On the EOS R3, things are a bit different. Aside from anything else, the camera doesn’t really use an array of discreet focus points, as SLRs did; instead, like other mirrorless models, it can autofocus anywhere in the frame. Secondly, its AF system is based heavily on subject recognition, meaning it can be set to detect people, animals or motor vehicles, and then specifically focus on them while ignoring anything else.

Again, this isn’t new; Sony has had great success with its Real-time Eye AF for portraits, while the Olympus OM-D E-M1X can recognise birds and various kinds of vehicles. But there’s often been a practical problem with these systems: if you have several possible subjects for the camera to choose between, it’s not always easy to get it to lock onto the one you want. This is where Eye control AF promises a significant advantage.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 3

Subject detection can be easily set between humans, animals and vehicles directly from the Q Menu

To try out the system, I first needed to find a suitable subject. You can, of course, shoot anything you like with the EOS R3, but with the best will in the world, you’re not going to learn much about it by shooting portraits or landscapes. Luckily, I live close to the famous old racing circuit at Brands Hatch. So I found myself driving there on a misty Saturday morning to photograph motorbike racing, armed with the EOS R3, 24-70mm f/2.8 and 70-200mm f/2.8 RF lenses, and a stack of memory cards. Oh, and after a last-minute request to Canon, I also had the decidedly unusual RF 800mm F11 IS STM lens to play with.

Canon EOS R3 – a quick recap

Before going any further, let’s take a step back and remind ourselves of the EOS R3’s main features. It employs an all-new 24MP full-frame stacked CMOS sensor, which enables not only the headline 30fps shooting speed, but also a silent electronic shutter that promises minimal rolling-shutter distortion. In addition, it boasts a world-record fastest shutter speed of an action-freezing 1/64,000sec. Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF facilitates phase-detection autofocus anywhere in the frame, while its AI-based subject recognition technology provides settings for focusing specifically on people, animals, and now motor vehicles.

Canon EOS R3 sensor

The EOS R3 is built around a new 24MP full-frame stacked-CMOS sensor

In design terms, the R3 is one of only a few mirrorless models with an integrated vertical grip for more comfortable use with large telephoto lenses, alongside the Olympus E-M1X and the Nikon’s upcoming Z 9. Its control layout borrows heavily from EOS-1D series professional DSLRs, while adding all the interface updates that we saw in the brilliant EOS R5 and R6.In fact, though, the design lineage goes back much further; almost all the controls that were on the EOS 3 are still to be found on the R3, and in pretty much the same places, too.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 4

The viewfinder is surrounded by a huge eyecup. Beneath it is a superb fully articulated LCD.

For composition, you get a superb 5.76m-dot EVF that offers 0.74x magnification. It’s surrounded by a huge, deep eyecup, which is necessary for Eye control AF to work reliably. New to the EOS R3 is an ‘OVF simulation view assist’ function, which rather than previewing the final processed image, mimics the experience of using an optical finder in terms of colour and contrast, and does so extremely well.

Underneath the EVF is a stunning 3.2in, 4.2m-dot fully articulated touchscreen, with practically every aspect of the camera’s operation being seamlessly integrated into the touch interface. This means you can change most settings using either the physical controls, or by touch.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 5

AF tracking is toggled on or off using the upper, convex button on the front, which is duplicated across the two grips.

Overall, anybody who’s used a high-end Canon camera over the past decade should be able to pick up the EOS R3 and get started almost straight away. But there’s one really important thing to do first, which is calibrate the Eye control AF. Thankfully, this is a simple process that only takes a minute; the camera instructs you to look left, right, up and down, while measuring your eye position at each point. Canon advises repeating it in a wide range of lighting conditions, which allows the camera to build up a thorough understanding of your eye structure and how it changes according to the ambient light.

More about the Canon RF 800mm F11 IS STM lens

You need a long lens to shoot motorbikes, and my first thought was to try the RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM. Unfortunately, Canon couldn’t lend me one at short notice, but provided the 800mm f/11 instead. This unusual design combines a fixed aperture, diffractive optics, image stabilisation and a collapsing barrel design to make a relatively affordable (£999) and portable ultra-telephoto, that can easily be used hand-held.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 6

Canon’s unique RF 800mm F11 IS STM lens is remarkably lightweight and affordable

I didn’t have especially high hopes for it, but ended up being pleasantly surprised, in particular with its ability to keep up with the EOS R3’s autofocus. It’s decently sharp, too, with its main optical flaw appearing to be reduced contrast when shooting into the light. The small aperture does, of course, often require you to use high ISO settings, especially given the fast shutter speeds often required. But with modern full-frame sensors, that’s no problem at all.

Canon EOS R3 and RF 800mm F11 IS STM motorcycle racing sample image

Canon EOS R3, RF 800mm F11 IS STM, 1/2000sec at f/11, ISO 2000.

The available autofocus zone is also reduced to a central square, so you have to pay more attention to keeping your subject covered, while the minimum focus distance is a lengthy 6m. But these are all acceptable compromises to get a full-frame 800mm that’s less than a third of the weight and a twelfth of the price of its high-end EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM cousin.

Shooting motorsports with the Canon EOS R3

Before setting out, I configured a custom mode for high-speed action, combining shutter priority with high-speed continuous shooting, servo AF, vehicle tracking, and eye control AF. But in fact, this was almost superfluous, because Canon makes it quick and easy to change all these settings with the camera up to your eye.

Canon EOS R3 motorcycle racing sample image with panning

Here I used a relatively slow shutter speed and panned with the subject. Canon EOS R3, RF 800mm F11 IS STM, 1/200sec at f/11, ISO 125

Tracking is enabled using a button on front, eye control can be toggled on and off using the SET button, and subject selection is accessible from the Q menu. It’s all very user friendly, and much easier to set up than the Sony Alpha 1 or Alpha 9 II.

The big question, of course, is whether Canon’s Eye control AF, subject detection and AF tracking all work together seamlessly. The answer is a resounding yes; in fact, it’s an incredibly intuitive way of shooting. You simply look at the subject you’re interested in and half-press the shutter, and the camera locks on instantly, outlining the subject in blue and tracking focus on it.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 7

Eye control AF is a brilliantly effective way of choosing between two possible subjects. Canon EOS R3, 1/2000sec at f/11, ISO 1250

For example, when I saw two bikes climbing up Hailwoods Hill, I was able to shift the camera’s attention to the chasing rider simply by looking at him; other AF systems would focus on the leader by default. This works so well that after a few minutes, you almost forget it’s even happening; the AF system just does your bidding with no need to touch a joystick. For this kind of fast-paced shooting, it’s a revolutionary feature.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 8

Canon EOS R3, RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM at 200mm, 1/2000sec at f/5, ISO 100

Canon’s continuous AF also works astonishingly well. In fact, I got a near-perfect hit-rate of in-focus shots, regardless of whether the subject was approaching or leaving the camera, or front- or back-lit. It also continued to work while zooming the lens, which isn’t always the case. Amazingly, it worked almost as well with the 800mm f/11 as it did with the 70-200mm f/2.8.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 9

The camera has no problem tracking focus on subjects travelling away from the camera. Canon EOS R3, RF 800mm F11 IS STM, 1/2000sec at f/22, ISO 2000

With most cameras, engaging the fastest drive speed via the electronic shutter comes with significant compromises. Rolling shutter distortion tends to be problematic, and continuous AF will often be unreliable or stop working altogether. But neither is a problem with the EOS R3.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 10

Canon EOS R3, RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM at 200mm, 1/64,000sec at f/3.2, ISO 6400

I stress-tested for rolling shutter effects by shooting bikes driving past at high speed with the camera position held fixed, firing off bursts when I heard one approaching and relying on the blistering 30fps speed to capture it in frame, which worked every time. On examining the resultant files, not only is there no image distortion worth mentioning, but by employing the 1/64,000sec top shutter speed, I also captured pin-sharp shots. If you look really closely there are some jagged artefacts on diagonal edges, but this is nit-picking.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 11

This 30fps thumbnail sequence shows the bike travelling through the frame. With a slower camera, you’d be really lucky to capture it.

A white frame flashes around the edge of the viewfinder during burst shooting, which gives a useful visual confirmation that the shutter is firing. Of course, 30 frames per second is demanding on data throughput, but this is where the CFexpress card format pays off.

I used a 64GB Lexar Professional Type B card with a rated 1000 MB/s write speed (fully 3x quicker than my fastest SDs), and it swallowed large bursts of JPEG and raw files effortlessly, without the camera ever perceptibly slowing down. Using the matched Lexar reader, I was also able to copy a card’s worth of files in less than seven minutes. For less demanding work, you can still use SD cards in the camera’s other slot.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 12

Files can be recorded either to UHS-II SD cards, or the super-fast CFexpress Type B slot

One area where mirrorless cameras still tend to get flak is with regards to stamina. In this respect, the EOS R3’s rating of 620 shots per charge when using the EVF may look like its Achilles’ Heel; after all, that equates to just 21 seconds of burst shooting. But this really reflects the fact that the CIPA battery life test is based around shooting single frames at distinct intervals, and is completely irrelevant for high-speed bursts.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 13

The battery may only officially be rated to 620 shots per charge, but if you mostly shoot bursts with the electronic shutter, it’ll deliver over 10,000 shots

Shooting mostly JPEG files at 30fps (as raw support isn’t yet available at the time of writing), I returned home with over 9000 shots and the battery still registering over 30%. With such a huge number of files, I also appreciated the ability to apply star-ratings using a dedicated external button, which are then recognised in imaging software such as Lightroom.

Canon EOS R3 – initial impressions in real-world use

With this being a Beta sample of the EOS R3, I can’t do the usual testing and image quality assessment that you’ll find in our full reviews. Instead, I can just show some pictures and give my initial thoughts on how well Canon’s new tech all fits together. Needless to say, I’m seriously impressed.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 14

Even with a consumer telephoto, the EOS R3 convincingly demonstrated the capabilities of its Eye control AF

Using the EOS R3 reminds me of when I first picked up the original Sony Alpha 9 and realised that mirrorless cameras had completely surpassed the capabilities of DSLRs with regards to shooting speed and autofocus. Now, Canon has more than matched that technology, but made a camera that offers vastly superior handling while being much easier and more intuitive to use. Indeed what impressed me most is just how easy the EOS R3 made it to get perfectly-sharp shots, time after time; using it almost feels like cheating. This is the camera that the Alpha 9 II wants to be when it grows up.

The Canon EOS R3 is a motorsports monster 15

Canon EOS R3, RF 800mm F11 IS STM, 1/125sec at f/11, ISO 100

It’s certainly an exciting time to be a photographer, with camera technology advancing at an extraordinary rate. Alongside the Sony Alpha 1 and Fujifilm GFX100S, the Canon EOS R3 shows the boundaries being pushed further than ever before. And let’s not forget, the Nikon Z 9 is still to come. We may be mourning our favourite old SLR systems, but their replacements are absolutely extraordinary, and with the EOS R3, Canon is right back at the head of the pack.

Post-script – animal detection AF

The Canon EOS R3 doesn’t just recognise motor vehicles, but animals too. For example, it easily detected this ring-necked parakeet’s body and head:

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Canon EOS R3, RF 800mm F11 IS STM, 1/8000sec at f/11, ISO 1600

Here’s a cormorant on its take-off run, again recognised and tracked by the camera:

Canon EOS R3 cormorant taking off

Canon EOS R3, RF 800mm F11 IS STM, 1/100sec at f/11, ISO 16,000

And finally, remarkably, here is a bee captured in mid-flight, using autofocus.

Canon EOS R3 bee in flight sample image

Canon EOS R3, RF 70-200mm F2.8L IS USM at 200mm, 1/2000sec at f/3.2, ISO 500

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Restoring and Photographing With a Large Format Bokeh Monster

Restoring and Photographing With a Large Format Bokeh Monster

Look at any photography discussion board or Facebook page, and you’ll quickly run into members obsessed with bokeh, or the quality of out-of-focus elements in a photograph. If you are in the bokeh-obsessed stage of photography, then large format wet plate photography is absolutely for you.

In fairness, I wouldn’t actually recommend large format or wet plate techniques to beginners. Large format photography is finicky, expensive, and requires a very high degree of control. Wet plate or wet plate collodion is an early processing technique where you need to photograph and develop your work within 15 minutes, so it requires instant access to a portable darkroom.

Neither of these is for beginners, but Markus Hofstätter makes the work look very accessible. In the video, Markus shows his entire process of purchasing a large format camera as well as what it takes to faithfully restore such a classic camera to a functioning level today. Markus additionally modifies his purchase, which works with film to accept a wet plate. He combines modern 3D printing with old-fashioned elbow grease to arrive at a camera that looks and works superbly!

If you are at a point in your photography where you are looking for an additional challenge, I’d definitely recommend dipping your foot into the film pond. 4×5 is a great place to start if you already have a firm grasp on exposing and composing photographs, and with readily accessible film processing labs, you can outsource some of the film development and scanning until you are ready to assimilate that part of the skill set into your workflow. Of course, if you are a bit more advanced than that, you can always give the wet plate a go — that’s actually something I haven’t tried for myself, yet!

It’s important to always learn and grow. There are always new things to try and learn, no matter if you’ve been photographing for a few days or several decades. What are some new things you’ve tried recently?

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Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster

Samsung announced the Galaxy M51 in August 2020 at a launch price of $399, which is right at the limit between our Advanced and High-End segments (the latter is $400-$599). Equipped with a 6.7-inch FHD+ Super AMOLED Plus display, a quad camera setup with a 64 MP main camera, and 128 GB of storage, it comes with the largest of all batteries in our database to date — a whopping 7000 mAh. We put the Samsung Galaxy M51 through its paces in our Battery testing protocol and are pleased to share the results below.

Key specifications:

  • Battery capacity: 7000 mAh
  • 25W charger included
  • Chipset: Qualcomm Snapdragon 730G (8 nm)
  • 6.7-inch, 1080 x 2400 FHD+ resolution, 60 Hz Super AMOLED Plus display
  • Tested ROM / RAM combination: 128 GB / 6 GB

About DXOMARK Battery tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone battery reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective tests over a week-long period both indoors and outdoors. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. (See our introductory and how we test articles for more details about our smartphone Battery protocol.)

Test summary

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 17Samsung Galaxy M51

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 18

88

battery

Pros

  • Best in our overall ranking across all devices tested to date (May 2021)
  • More than 3 days of average use and almost 2 full days of intensive use
  • Low power consumption in most on the go and calibrated use cases

Cons

  • Charging is only average at best.
  • Device feels somewhat big and heavy because of the large battery.

With an overall Battery score of 88, the Samsung Galaxy M51 not only comes in first in its price segment at the time of this publication, but first across all segments to date. While weighed down a bit by its large 7000 mAh battery, that same battery provides more than 72 hours of autonomy with average use. It performed particularly well in our calibrated use case tests, scoring an astonishing 100 points, leading all other smartphones in every use case score except for 3G calling. Further, the Samsung device also racked up an excellent score for efficiency. The only area in which the Galaxy M51 failed to garner top marks was for charging, with only low-average performance in both our empty-to-full charging and our five-minute quick boost tests.

We compared the Samsung Galaxy M51’s performance in several key categories with two other Advanced devices, the Motorola Moto G9 Power and the Huawei P40 Lite; battery capacity, charger, display type and resolution, and processor specifications for all three devices are shown in the table below.

Samsung Galaxy M51

Motorola Moto G9 Power

Huawei P40 Lite

Battery (mAh)

7000

6000

4200

Charger (W)

25W

20W

40W

Display type

AMOLED

IPS LCD

IPS LCD

Resolution

1080 x 2400

720 x 1640

1080 x 2310

Processor

Qualcomm Snapdragon 730G (8 nm)

Qualcomm Snapdragon 662 (11 nm)

Kirin 810 (7 nm)

Autonomy (96)

How long a battery charge lasts depends not only on battery capacity, but also other aspects of the phone’s hardware and software. The DXOMARK Battery autonomy score is composed of three performance sub-scores: (1) Stationary, (2) On the go, and (3) Calibrated use cases. Each sub-score comprises the results of a comprehensive range of tests for measuring autonomy in all kinds of real-life scenarios.

Light Usage

104h

Light

Active: 2h30/day

Moderate Usage

73h

Moderate

Active: 4h/day

Intense Usage

45h

Intense

Active: 7h/day

It is unusual for our engineers to enthuse in their written analyses of the devices they test, but this time they could not help themselves, rightly calling the Samsung Galaxy M51 an “autonomy monster!” (exclamation point theirs). And indeed, the Samsung’s sterling performance puts it in the lead in all our of autonomy test categories thus far. That said, the M51’s battery linearity is a little under par, as when its indicator says it has 20% power left, it really has only 16.5% — but this is a minor quibble.

Let’s take a closer look at its autonomy achievements.

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 20

Stationary

Wiko Power U30

Best: Wiko Power U30 (104)

A robot housed in a Faraday cage performs a set of touch-based user actions during what we call our “typical usage scenario” (TUS) — making calls, video streaming, etc. — 4 hours of active use over the course of a 16-hour period, plus 8 hours of “sleep.” The robot repeats this set of actions every day until the device runs out of power. 

The Samsung Galaxy M51’s huge 7000 mAh battery gave it an undeniable advantage over both the Motorola Moto G9 Power and the Huawei P40 Lite in our autonomy tests, with the Galaxy M51 running for four full nights and three full days, for a total of 80 hours and 40 minutes (vs. 67 hours for the Moto G9 Power with its 6000 mAh battery and nearly 56 hours for the Huawei and its much smaller 4200 mAh battery). Perhaps equally if not more impressive, the Samsung device can provide almost two full days of intensive use.

The graph below shows how the Samsung Galaxy M51 and its rivals performed in our robot-driven typical usage scenario:

Typical Usage Scenario discharge curves

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 21

On the go

Using a smartphone on the go takes a toll on autonomy because of extra “hidden” demands, such as the continuous signaling associated with cellphone network selection, for example. DXOMARK Battery experts take the phone outside and perform a precisely defined set of activities while following the same three-hour travel itinerary for each device.

It was a similar story in our on the go tests, with the Samsung device holding a commanding lead over the Motorola, which in turn performed much better than the Huawei. The Galaxy M51 took top marks in every category except for camera, where it was edged out by the Moto G9 Power.

Estimated autonomy for on the go use cases (full charge)

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 22

Calibrated

For this series of tests, the smartphone returns to the Faraday cage and our robots repeatedly perform actions linked to specific sets of activities (use cases) such as gaming, streaming, etc.

The difference in scores between the Samsung Galaxy M51 and both the Motorola and Huawei devices is mainly due to the M51’s vastly larger battery capacity, with neither competitor coming anywhere near the Samsung Galaxy M51’s 100-point score (the Moto G9 Power is some 27 points behind at 73, and the P40 Lite brings up the rear of the segment at 59 points — 41 points behind the M51).

Estimated autonomy for calibrated use cases (full charge)

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 23

The Samsung Galaxy M51 in a gaming use case.

Charging (61)

The DXOMARK Battery charging score is composed of two sub-scores, charging speed and quick power boost. Full charge tests assess the reliability of the battery power gauge; measure how long it takes to charge a battery from 0% to 80% capacity and from 80% to 100%; and measure how long and how much power the battery takes to go from an indicated 100% to an actual full charge. With the phone at different charge levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%), Quick boost tests measure the amount of charge the battery receives after being plugged in for 5 minutes. 

Wired

Wired

While objectively average, the Samsung Galaxy M51’s charging performance was nowhere near as good as its performance for autonomy and efficiency, soundly outperformed (by nearly 1.5 hours) by the Huawei P40 Lite both because of the P40’s far smaller battery capacity (4200 mAh) and its more powerful 40W charger. Our engineers found that while the M51’s charger started out at 25W as labeled, it spent most of its zero to 80% charging time at around 20W. Still, that was enough to beat the Motorola Moto G9 Power’s time by almost a half-hour.

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 24

Full charge

Oppo Find X3 Pro

Best: Oppo Find X3 Pro (104)

Power consumption and battery level during full charge

Charging from empty to 80% capacity took the Samsung Galaxy M51 one hour and 23 minutes, then another 31 minutes to go from 80% capacity to when the battery indicator shows 100%; and finally, another 30 minutes to achieve a full charge, for a total close to 2.5 hours in all. (This puts the accuracy of its battery indicator at 95%, by the way, which is behind the Moto’s at 99% and the P40 Lite’s at 97%.) While the Samsung’s charging time puts it in second place among the three devices in this review, the graph below shows how just far a cry it is from the first-place Huawei:

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 25

Quick boost

Oppo Find X3 Neo

Best: Oppo Find X3 Neo (95)

After plugging in for 5 minutes at each tested battery level (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%), the Samsung Galaxy M51 gained between 2 hours and 2 hours 20 minutes of autonomy. Its Quick boost score was better than the Motorola Moto G9 Power’s by a few points, but once again, the Huawei took the top spot by a significant margin.

Samsung Galaxy M51Motorola Moto G9 PowerHuawei P40 Lite
Autonomy boost20%2:121:515:13
40%2:262:005:04
60%2:062:034:02
80%2:052:062:15
Percentage boost20%4.1 %4 %15.2 %
40%4.5 %4.3 %14.8 %
60%3.9 %4.4 %11.7 %
80%3.9 %4.6 %6.6 %
Energy consumed20%1405 mWh1452 mWh3142 mWh
40%1553 mWh1561 mWh3055 mWh
60%1342 mWh1601 mWh2425 mWh
80%1331 mWh1641 mWh1355 mWh

Efficiency (87)

The DXOMARK power efficiency score consists of two sub-scores, Charge up and Discharge, both of which combine data obtained during robot-based typical usage scenario testing, outdoor mobility testing, charging evaluation, and power measurements, and then take into consideration the device’s battery capacity.

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 26

Charge up

Oppo Find X3 Neo

Best: Oppo Find X3 Neo (82)

The Samsung Galaxy M51 displays an efficient charging process, with 78.7% of the electrical power drawn from the wall outlet stored in the battery, which puts in on par with the Huawei P40 Lite, and represents 14% more than the Motorola Moto G9 Power. The Galaxy M51’s charger has negligible power consumption when the phone is not plugged in; the Huawei and Motorola devices consume a bit more but still display average consumption in this regard. However, when the phones are plugged into their chargers, all three consume about a little less than average power.

With 79% nominal efficiency, the Samsung Galaxy M51 ties with the Huawei P40 Lite, and both beat the Motorola Moto G9 Power, which came in a distant second in this comparison at 64%.

Samsung Galaxy M51 Battery review: An autonomy monster 27

Discharge

Apple iPhone 12 Pro Max

Best: Apple iPhone 12 Pro Max (116)

The Samsung Galaxy M51 manages power consumption well for all calibrated use case tests; while it ties the Huawei P40 Lite for the most part, it is actually better than the Huawei device for video streaming, and it is better than the Motorola Moto G9 Power, which struggles in use cases with the display on (such as gaming and video), despite its lower screen resolution. This all said, it was a tight race between the Samsung and the Huawei for the top scores in both discharge and the overall Efficiency, but ultimately the Samsung came out ahead. (The Huawei came close for discharge because its nighttime consumption is better than the Samsung’s, but not better enough to win.)

Conclusion

The Samsung Galaxy M51 comes with a “monster” 7000 mAh battery that outperforms the competition for both autonomy and efficiency. Where it falls down a little is in charging, where it takes nearly 2.5 hours to go from empty to a full charge — almost an hour longer than the Huawei P40 Lite (with its faster charger). Still, its overall performance is currently the best in our Battery database, promising and delivering excellent battery life whether lightly or intensively used.

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How This Six Second Monster Energy Drink Commercial Was Made

How This Six Second Monster Energy Drink Commercial Was Made

This fantastic looking Monster energy drink commercial was made in a fairly easy to replicate way. Here is a behind the scenes look at what went into creating the shot.

When it comes to product photography and videography, doing a lot with a little is the hallmark of someone with experience. While many shoots — particularly for big brands — can be elaborate and expensive, many aren’t. With smaller products like drinks or jewellery, you have far more control over the scene and what the viewer sees. That means you can build miniature sets which create a believable but attractive visual.

For example, I often use high-end tiles of marble or granite as my platform for product photography or videography. It is, in essence, just one large and expensive tile, but it gives the impression that you are in a room filled with that sort of opulence. The same can be done with props to give an impression of something quite different, like Daniel Shiffer’s sea of coffee beans in the above video. It’s a beautifully lit scene, but my favorite outtake from the creation has to be the Venus Optics Laowa Probe lens shot that travels through the beans.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster

Today Huawei launched its new high-end smartphone, the Mate 40 Pro, and we’ve had one of the first units in for testing under version 4 of the DXOMARK Camera test protocol. The camera setup is very similar to the P40 Pro launched earlier this year, but there are some subtle differences. The Mate 40 Pro’s primary camera does not feature an optical stabilization system but otherwise comes with the same 1/1.28″ sensor and f/1.9-aperture lens as the P-series model. The ultra-wide camera retains the P40 Pro’s lens with an f/1.8 aperture and 18 mm equivalent field of view, but now uses a 20 MP sensor with bigger pixels instead of 40 MP. The specs of the 5x tele-camera remain unchanged.

With relatively few changes compared to the P40 Pro’s camera specifications, we were curious to see if the Huawei engineers were able to increase image quality and camera performance even further on the new model. Read on to find out if they succeeded and how the Huawei Mate 40 Pro performed under the brand-new version 4 of the DXOMARK Camera test protocol.

Key camera specifications:

  • Triple camera setup
  • Primary: 50 MP 1/1.28″ sensor (12 MP output), 23 mm-equivalent (1x defined as 27 mm) f/1.9-aperture lens, full-pixel Octa-PD
  • Ultra-wide: 20 MP 1/1.54″ sensor, 18mm-equivalent f/1.8-aperture lens, PDAF
  • Tele: 12 MP 1/3.56″ sensor, 125mm-equivalent f/3.4-aperture lens, PDAF, OIS
  • LED flash
  • 4K video, 2160p/60f ps (2160p/30 fps tested)
  • Multispectral color temperature sensor

About DXOMARK Camera tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone camera reviews, DXOMARK engineers capture and evaluate over 3000 test images and more than 2.5 hours of video both in controlled lab environments and in natural indoor and outdoor scenes, using the camera’s default settings. This article is designed to highlight the most important results of our testing. For more information about the DXOMARK Camera test protocol, click here. More details on how we score smartphone cameras are available here.

Test summary

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 28
Huawei Mate 40 Pro

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 29

136

camera

Huawei has a history of designing smartphones with great cameras and the Mate 40 Pro is no exception. The new model achieves an outstanding DXOMARK Camera score of 136 and is the new number one in our ranking. The Photo sub-score of 140 is a new high as well, thanks to excellent results for pretty much all attributes.

Dynamic range is a particular highlight. As you would expect from a flagship phone in 2020, the camera captures good target exposure down to low light. In addition the Mate 40 Pro manages to maintain a wide dynamic range across light levels, even in very low light. In comparison, many competitors are capable of recording good highlights and shadow details in bright light but struggle to do so in dim conditions. This makes the new Huawei a great option for night shots and other difficult low-light scenarios.

The camera also offers a great tradeoff between texture and noise, with good detail and low levels of noise in images captured across all light levels. Sharpness is further helped by an accurate autofocus system that locks on without delay when shooting with the primary camera. The Mate 40 Pro’s portrait mode does a good job at creating a natural-looking bokeh simulation that doesn’t look far off from something a DSLR and fast lens could capture. Our testers were particularly impressed by the depth estimation that works well even with hair and other complex subjects.

Image artifacts are well controlled, too, with only some color quantization and aliasing, but you’d have to look pretty hard to spot any of those issues, making them pretty much irrelevant for normal shooting.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 31
Outdoor images on the Huawei Mate 40 Pro display good exposure with fairly wide dynamic range and excellent color rendering.

The Mate 40 Pro also achieves a very good Zoom score of 88 but cannot quite keep with the very best in this new category that combines tele and wide sub-scores. The combination of digital super-zoom on the primary camera and the dedicated tele-lens is capable of recording good detail at all tele settings. However, the Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra with its two dedicated tele lenses just has the edge, especially at close and medium zoom ranges. We also found that the Huawei’s autofocus struggled in quite a few tele shots, which lowered its score.

The ultra-wide camera comes with the same limitations as previous high-end Huaweis: the field of view is considerably narrower than on most direct competitors. Image quality is otherwise generally excellent, though. So if you can live with a little less wideness, the Mate 40 Pro is still an excellent choice for wide-angle aficionados.

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The tele-camera provides good levels of detail across all zoom settings.

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Image quality on the ultra-wide is generally excellent, but the field of view is narrower than on the competition.

With a Video score of 116, the Mate 40 Pro also takes the top spot in the moving images category. The Huawei’s 4K footage shows good detail and low noise levels in all situations. Color is nice, too, and the auto white balance system works well and adjusts smoothly to changes in illumination.

The autofocus system is accurate and adapts smoothly when the subject distance changes, avoiding any unwanted jumps or pumping. The effective video stabilization also helps create a cinematic effect, making footage look very smooth and stable, which is particularly noticeable when panning or even when running while recording.

On the downside, some highlight clipping can occur in difficult high-contrast scenes and the stabilization does struggle a little bit when walking while recording in low light. In such challenging conditions, sharpness differences between frames can become visible. In terms of artifacts, we’ve observed some color quantization and ghosting effects on Mate 40 Pro video clips. Those minor quibbles aside, the new Huawei is an excellent choice for mobile video shooters and deservedly achieves our highest Video score to date under the updated test protocol.



Huawei Mate 40 Pro, low-light video

Photo scores explained

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro achieves an outstanding Photo score of 140, thanks to excellent results across all image quality attributes. In this section, we take a closer look at how each sub-score was determined and compare image quality against some key competitors.

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Exposure and Contrast

The Mate 40 Pro achieves the best score to date under our updated test protocol. Not only is target exposure good down to very low light, the Mate 40 Pro is also capable of maintaining a wide dynamic range in low-light conditions, something that most competitors struggle with. 

All three devices deliver good exposure for this backlit scene, but the Mate 40 Pro does even a little better than the P40 Pro and Xiaomi by lifting brightness slightly on the statue and building.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, excellent exposure

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 36

Huawei P40 Pro, good exposure

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, good exposure

The Mate 40 Pro does impressively well in this low-light shot, with the differences to the reference clearly visible. The Mate is capable of delivering a noticeably wider dynamic range in low light. As a result, it shows more detail in both the dark areas at the front of the bar and in the bright lightbulb.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, excellent dynamic range

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Huawei P40 Pro, some shadow and highlight clipping

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, some shadow and highlight clipping

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Color

The Mate 40 Pro also achieves a very high score for color. Color has noticeably improved over the P40 Pro, which often showed color casts in various light conditions, especially in low light. On the Mate 40 Pro, white balance is accurate in pretty much all conditions and color rendering is pleasant. In this indoor shot, the Mate 40 Pro produces natural and pleasing colors, but both the P40 Pro and Mi 10 Ultra images have fairly strong reddish color casts, making for unnatural skin tones and overall color rendering.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, nice color rendering

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Huawei P40 Pro, reddish cast

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, reddish cast

The Mate 40 Pro also delivers the nicest color rendering in this outdoor scene.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, nice color rendering

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Huawei P40 Pro, slight pinkish cast

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, slight blueish cast

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Autofocus

The Mate 40 Pro autofocus is accurate and fast to lock on in all conditions. It’s also a noticeable improvement over the P40 Pro which slows down noticeably in HDR light conditions.

You can see in our chart below that under indoor 1000 lux lighting with 7 EV contrast, the Mate 40 Pro finds sharp focus on all 30 shots, and does so without delay. The Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra performs very similarly, but the the P40 Pro, while accurate, slows down a little compared to the other two devices.

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Autofocus comparison under outdoor lighting (1000 lux) with 7 EV variation

This is the setup we use for testing AF under HDR conditions. All three images are sharp, but as shown in the graph above, the P40 Pro AF is slower than the others. The new Mate 40 Pro is faster and delivers better dynamic range. The Xiaomi is equally fast, but dynamic range is noticeably lower.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, HDR test scene

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Huawei P40 Pro, HDR test scene

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, HDR test scene

The Mate 40 Pro still did not achieve one of the best scores for autofocus because of its limited depth of field. This means that in a group portrait, people towards the back of the scene tend to be slightly out of focus. This is also true for images that have people at the front and another element of interest in the background—for example, typical tourist shots. In this image you can see that the effect is little more pronounced on the Mate 40 Pro than on the comparison devices.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, depth of field

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, background subject slightly out of focus

Huawei P40 Pro, depth of field

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop. background subject slightly out of focus

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, depth of field

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, background subject slightly out of focus

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Texture

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Noise

The Mate 40 Pro scores well for both texture and noise, and balances both attributes very well. In our measurements the Huawei Mate 40 Pro and P40 Pro, as well as the Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, all deliver very good detail across all light levels. However, the Mate 40 Pro loses some ground in low light compared to the reference devices; this is clearly visible in our new texture measurements, which are based on the DXOMARK test chart.

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As indicated by the graph, differences are more visible in low light. Compared to the P40 Pro, the Mate 40 Pro lacks detail on the skin textures in this crop. The Xiaomi is also better than the new Huawei.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, low-light texture and detail (5 lux)

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop,

Huawei P40 Pro, low-light texture and detail (5 lux)

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, low-light texture and detail (5 lux)

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop,

The differences in detail in these outdoor shots are minimal, but the Xiaomi just has the edge over the Huawei devices.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, outdoor detail

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, very good detail

Huawei P40 Pro, outdoor detail

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop, very good detail

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, outdoor detail

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, excellent detail

In the noise analysis, the three devices’ performance is very close in bright outdoor light and under typical indoor conditions. Some small differences appear only at light levels below 10 lux. Even then, noise is well controlled on all cameras.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 74

These results are reflected in this indoor scene: the level of detail is excellent and noise very well under control for all three devices.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, indoor texture and noise

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, good detail, low noise

Huawei P40 Pro, indoor texture and noise

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop, good detail, low noise

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, indoor texture and noise

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, good detail, low noise

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Artifacts

Image artifacts are well controlled overall on the Huawei Mate 40 Pro, but the device is not among the very best we have tested. You’d have to magnify the view quite a bit to spot any issues, but the most obvious artifacts our testers found are color quantization and aliasing. Other more minor effects include ghosting and ringing.

Color quantization is often visible in areas of plain color. In the shot below, it is visible in the shape of pinkish areas on the ceiling.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, color quantization

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 83

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, pinkish spots on the ceiling

You’ll sometimes see staircase aliasing on diagonal lines, but in practice the effect is weak enough that you won’t have to worry about it too much.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, aliasing

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 85

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, stepping effect on diagonal lines

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Night

The Mate 40 Pro is a very capable device for night shots, with good exposure and wide dynamic range. In this comparison, its exposure is a little darker than the Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra’s, but it maintains much better highlight detail in the bright areas of the frame, making for an overall better shot. On the downside, the level of captured detail is a little lower than on the P40 Pro and the Xiaomi in very low light.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, flash off

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 88

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, good exposure, wide dynamic range

Huawei P40 Pro, flash off

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 90

Huawei P40 Pro, crop, slightly darker exposure, less dynamic range

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, flash off

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 92

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, brighter exposure but clipped highlights

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 93

Bokeh

In its portrait mode, the Mate 40 Pro captures images with an overall natural-looking simulated bokeh effect. Depth estimation tends to be very good, even in difficult areas such as hair, and exposure and color are nice, too, making for very nice-looking portrait images overall.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, pleasant bokeh effect

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Huawei P40 Pro, pleasant bokeh effect

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 96

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, pleasant bokeh effect

The Mate 40 Pro’s depth sensing is excellent even in challenging scenes. Below, the subject holds onto a fence, which can throw off the depth sensing of even the best smartphones. The Mate 40 Pro still makes a very precise distinction between foreground and background. The P40 Pro and Xiaomi do a good job as well, but not quite on the same level as the new Huawei flagship.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, outdoor bokeh

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, excellent depth estimation

Huawei P40 Pro, outdoor bokeh

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop, good depth estimation

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, outdoor bokeh

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, good depth estimation

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Preview

Preview is one of the very few areas of weakness for the Mate 40 Pro. In most situations, the image you see on your preview screen looks quite a bit different to the captured image. For example, while target exposure usually previews well, HDR processing is not accurately visualized in preview. In this shot, the highlight clipping in the bright background is much stronger in the preview image than in the captured photograph.

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 105

Capture, wide dynamic range

This is also documented in our measurements. Contrast entropy, which indicates dynamic range, is much higher for the capture than for the preview image at all light conditions. Contrast entropy is measured on the grey patches on the backlit panel in the lab scene above. At a maximum value of 8, all levels of gray can be distinguished; a value below 6 is considered a failure.

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Contrast entropy for preview and capture

The device does a little better for bokeh. The background blurring effect is fairly accurately rendered in the preview, but there is a noticeable lag, resulting in moving subjects being in a different position in the final capture than in the preview image. Zoom preview isn’t great either, as zoom motion can be jerky, which is exacerbated by a reduced preview frame rate in low light.

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Preview, decent bokeh simulation in preview

Huawei Mate 40 Pro Camera review: Dynamic range monster 108

Capture, delay between preview image and capture

Zoom scores explained

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro achieves a very good Zoom score of 88, putting it into the current top three in this category. The Zoom score includes the tele and wide sub-scores. In this section, we take a closer look at how these sub-scores were achieved and compare zoom image quality against some key competitors.

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Tele

The Mate 40 Pro is our second-best camera to date for tele-zoom, thanks to good levels of detail across all zoom levels. For this medium-range shot, the camera sticks to using its primary camera and a super-resolution algorithm, but the result is more than acceptable. Detail is not quite as good as on the Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, which features two dedicated tele lenses, though.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, medium-range 50mm

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, good detail

Huawei P40 Pro, medium-range 50mm

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop, good detail

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, medium-range 50mm

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, excellent detail

Once the dedicated 5x tele lens of the Mate takes over, it outperforms even the Xiaomi in terms of image detail. All three devices deliver impressive image quality for a smartphone tele in this long-range comparison, but the Huawei devices just beat the Xiaomi by a whisker.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, long-range 170mm

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, excellent detail

Huawei P40 Pro, long-range 170mm

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop, excellent detail

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, long-range 170mm

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, very good detail

On the downside, tele-zoom shots on the Mate 40 Pro are occasionally out of focus. When that happens, you have to slightly zoom in and out again in order to “reset” the focus and take another shot. This is something that Huawei can hopefully fix with a future firmware update.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, medium-range 90mm

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, out of focus

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Wide

The Mate 40 Pro’s ultra-wide-angle captures images with very good overall image quality. Detail, noise, and dynamic range are all excellent for an ultra-wide, but the camera comes with the same limitation as on previous Huawei models: at 18 mm-equivalent, the field of view is the narrowest of all high-end phones we have tested. In comparison, the Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra is capable of squeezing a lot more scene into the frame, thanks to a much wider 12 mm field of view.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, ultra-wide 18 mm

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro, crop, excellent detail but narrow field of view

Huawei P40 Pro, ultra-wide 18 mm

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Huawei P40 Pro, crop, excellent detail but narrow field of view

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, ultra-wide 12 mm

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Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, crop, good detail, wide field of view

Video scores explained

A device’s overall Video score is derived from its performance and results across a range of attributes in the same way as the Photo score. Tested in its 4K/30fps mode, the Huawei Mate 40 Pro achieved a Video score of 116, the highest to date. Its Video sub-scores are as follows: Exposure (102), Color (100), Autofocus (105), Texture (92), Noise (105), Artifacts (79), and Stabilization (102). In this section, we take a closer look at the device’s strengths and weakness for video, with some comparisons against its key competitors.

Recording video clips in dim conditions is usually no problem with the Mate 40 Pro. Exposure is good down to low light and really only drops off below a very dark 5 lux. This said, we did observe some slight underexposure and limited dynamic range in challenging bright light scenes.

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Video target exposure comparison

Color rendering is slightly different than that for still images, but still very nice and earns the Mate a top score for color in video. The auto white balance system works accurately, too, with smooth transitions in changing light conditions. 4K video footage shows high levels of detail and noise levels are very well controlled when shooting video in all conditions, even in low light, as you can see in this clip.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, low-light video

Huawei P40 Pro, low-light video

This is confirmed by our lab measurements, which show very low noise levels for the Mate 40 Pro in all light levels. In low light it is actually a little better than the P40 Pro and very close to the excellent Mi 10 Ultra.

While all three devices provide very similar measurements for noise, the differences are more noticeable for texture, at least in low-light conditions. The Mate 40 Pro still achieves over 70 percent acutance at 1 lux while the Xiaomi drops to approximately 50 percent and the P40 Pro even lower to 25 percent.

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The Huawei’s autofocus works well for video, too, with fast but smooth adaptation in most situations, keeping the subject reliably in focus. This can be seen in this outdoor clip. The transition from the foreground subject to the background is seamless while the camera is panning.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, outdoor video

Huawei P30 Pro, outdoor video

Video artifacts are well controlled overall, too, but like for stills, we did see some color quantization on areas of plain color, and the occasional ghosting effect. We also observed some variation of sharpness between frames when recording in low light while walking, but other than that, the Mate 40 Pro’s stabilization system does a very good job at keeping things steady and creating something close to a steady-cam effect, as you can see in this indoor clip (Mate 40 on the left, P40 Pro on the right).

Huawei Mate 40 Pro, indoor video

Huawei P40 Pro, indoor video

Conclusion

It appears Huawei camera engineers have kept very busy after the launch of the P40 Pro earlier this year in order to make the Mate 40 Pro’s camera even better, despite the lack of optical image stabilization in the primary module. The new model improves on the already very good performance of the P40 Pro in several areas and is particularly impressive for dynamic range, providing good highlight retention even in low light, something that even many flagship phones struggle with. This makes it an excellent choice for any kind of low-light photography, but the new Huawei is more than capable of dealing with any photographic challenge you throw at it.

It’s not quite the best, but one of the best for tele-zoom, and while ultra-wide shooters have to make do with a narrower field of view than on many competitors, the overall image quality of the ultra-wide camera leaves few reasons to complain.

It’s also the best device we have tested to date for Video, thanks to excellent noise control, effective stabilization, and smooth autofocus adaptation, making it the currently most versatile smartphone for any kind of mobile visual content creators.

Pros

  • Wide dynamic range, even in low light
  • Excellent texture/noise trade-off in bright light and indoor conditions
  • Fast and accurate AF for photo and video
  • Good detail at most tele-zoom settings
  • Good depth estimation in bokeh mode, even in complex scenes
  • Fairly wide dynamic range in night shots
  • Excellent video stabilization
  • Low noise levels on outdoor and indoor videos
  • Accurate white balance and pleasant color rendering on videos

Cons

  • Comparatively narrow field of view on ultra-wide camera
  • Color quantization and aliasing artifacts
  • Tele-zoom images often out of focus
  • Slight underexposure and limited dynamic range in very challenging video scenes
  • Variation in sharpness between frames when walking while recording video and in low light
  • Occasional color quantization and ghosting artifacts on video

Please also have a look at our Huawei Mate 40 Pro gallery below. It includes images that our experts shot in a variety of situations and shooting modes for you to view and examine.

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