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Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review

Andy Westlake puts Nikon’s affordable, lightweight full-frame standard prime through its paces

When Nikon launched its full-frame mirrorless Z system in late 2018, it kicked off with three lenses, namely a 24-70mm f/4 zoom alongside 35mm f/1.8 and 50mm f/1.8 primes. All were part of a new premium S line, promising top-notch optics while being smaller, lighter and more affordable than the high-end, large-aperture lenses conventionally offered for DSLRs. But with launch prices of £849 and £599 respectively, those two f/1.8 primes still weren’t exactly cheap.

This is where the new Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 comes in, with its price tag of just £249. In effect, it does the much same job in the Z lens range as the old AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G did for F-mount DSLRs, promising strong optical performance and a large aperture at a keen price.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review 1

Nikon’s Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 is designed as an everyday standard prime for its full-frame mirrorless Z-system cameras

With its 40mm focal length, this lens slots neatly in between its 35mm and 50mm siblings in terms of angle of view. It may be an unfamiliar focal length to DSLR users, but has seen something of a surge in popularity recently. Many photographers find the 40-45mm range to represent the perfect ‘standard’ lens, offering a very natural perspective to images.

Probably the most similar lens available for full-frame mirrorless cameras is the similarly lightweight and inexpensive Samyang AF 45mm F1.8 FE. But we’ve also seen the compact, metal-barrelled Sony FE 40mm F2.5 G and the premium, close-focusing Zeiss Batis 40mm F2 CF. None of these are available in Nikon Z mount, but they do provide a basis for comparison. So how does Nikon’s budget offering measure up?

Nikon Z 40mm f/2: Features

Unsurprisingly, one area where the 40mm f/2 differs from its more expensive stablemates lies with the complexity of its optics. It employs 6 elements arranged in 4 groups, just half as many as are used by the Nikkor Z 50mm f/1.8 S.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 optical design

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 optical design: 6 elements in 4 groups, including 2 aspherical

But while this formula might sound superficially similar to traditional 50mm f/1.8s for DSLRs, the optical design is in fact rather different. It employs a relatively small front element and a much larger rear element, a common pattern with mirrorless-optimised lenses which aims to optimise illumination of the image sensor all the way into its corners. Nikon has also included two aspherical elements to improve cross-frame sharpness.

Nikon 40mm f/2 showing 52mm filter thread

There’s a 52mm thread for attaching filters or a lens hood

The lens employs an internal focus design driven by a quiet stepper motor, with a minimum object distance of just 29cm. This approach has also enabled Nikon to include sealing against dust and moisture, which is rare at this price point and very welcome. A 52mm front thread allows filters to be attached, but there’s no separate mount for a lens hood.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 9-blade aperture

The aperture diaphragm employs 9 curved blades

Nikon has included an aperture diaphragm with 9 rounded blades, which unusually is very visible towards the front of the optical system. The idea is to give attractively blurred backgrounds when stopped down a little. It should also give 18-ray sun stars, for those who are concerned about such things.

Nikkor Z 40mm f/2:  Build and Handling

Another area where Nikon has saved costs becomes evident when you examine the lens. Not only is the barrel constructed of lightweight but sturdy plastics, but so is the mount. This is always a controversial approach, but happily it doesn’t affect how easily the lens can be swapped on and off the camera.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review 2

The lens employs a plastic mount, with the outer barrel overhanging by about 1mm to provide a barrier against dust and water getting into the camera

There’s no rubber O-ring seal at the back; instead, the outer barrel slightly overhangs the mount surface, to form a physical barrier against water getting into the camera.

This is also a very simple design in terms of controls. There’s just a broad manual-focus ring onboard that has a textured plastic grip and rotates smoothly without any end-stops. As usual with Nikon, it can be re-assigned from the camera to control the aperture, ISO or exposure compensation.

Nikon 40mm f/2 on Nikon Z7, in-hand

The manual focus ring can also be used to change exposure settings, but it’s very easy to nudge and throw them off accidentally

However, as the focus ring is the natural place to grasp the lens with your left hand and lacks any click stops, I found it far too easy to nudge accidentally. I’d rather use the camera’s dials to change exposure settings instead.

Of course, the big attraction of the 40mm f/2 is its size and weight. At 45.5mm in length and 170g, only the similarly designed Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 is smaller within Nikon’s full-frame Z-mount range. Compared to the 50mm f/1.8 S, the 40mm f/2 is half the weight and just a little over half the length.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review 3

At just 46mm in length, the 40mm f/2 makes for a compact package on Nikon’s Z cameras

On the Nikon Z 7 body I used for testing, you hardly even notice it’s there. It’s the kind of lens that you can throw in your bag and carry around all way without a second thought, which makes it perfect for travelling light.

Nikon 40mm f/2: Autofocus

One compromise that’s often made with inexpensive lenses is autofocus speed. But that’s not really the case here, thanks of the internal focus design. Instead, the lens is generally very snappy, autofocusing silently and accurately wherever you tell it to. I did occasionally find it refused to focus for no apparent reason, mostly when trying to get it to shift between distant and close-up subjects. But this didn’t happen often enough to be seriously troublesome.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review 4

Autofocus is reasonably fast, silent, and accurate. Nikon Z 7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/320sec at f/2, ISO 400; 20MP APS-C crop (60mm equivalent)

If you do find yourself needing to tweak focus manually, you’ll have to engage this from the camera, as there’s no focus mode switch on the lens itself. While the focus ring works electronically rather than mechanically, manual focus still responds promptly and intuitively. Turning the ring brings up a basic distance scale in the camera’s viewfinder, but for the most accurate results, it’s best to engage magnified live view using the requisite button on the camera body.

Nikkor 40mm f/2: Image Quality

So now for the most important question – what kind of image quality does this relatively inexpensive optic deliver? Unsurprisingly, it doesn’t hit the same heights as its S-series siblings when used with the aperture wide open. But the good news is that it still delivers very attractive-looking images.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review 5

Despite its low price, the Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 gives really attractive images. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/125sec at f/2, ISO 800

Stop the aperture down and it gets very sharp indeed; at f/5.6 or f/8, it delivers more than enough detail to match the Z 7’s 45.7MP sensor from corner to corner. This is pretty good going for a £249 lens.

Nikon 40mm f/2 sample image at f/8

Plenty of detail is resolved at the lens’s sweet spot around f/8. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/80sec at f/8, ISO 100

Let’s look at its characteristics in a little more detail. Central sharpness is very respectable even at f/2, and this performance extends to the top and bottom edges of the frame. At the left and right edges, detail starts to soften visibly when viewed at 100% onscreen, while the extreme corners are decidedly blurred. But then again, the chances of any important detail being in focus in the corners at f/2 is pretty slim.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 low light sample at F2

With its relatively bright f/2 aperture, the lens is useful for shooting in low light. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/8sec at f/2, ISO 1600, hand-held

Stop down to f/4 and the centre and edges sharpen up very nicely; by f/5.6 the entire frame is as sharp as it’s ever going to be. At the smallest aperture of f/16 diffraction softening takes the edge off the finest detail. But even so, I wouldn’t hesitate to stop down this far when the extra depth of field is important.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 sample at f/16

Diffraction takes the edge off sharpness at f/16, but that’s no reason not to use it. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/60sec at f/16, ISO 100

One area where the 40mm f/2 lags behind its more complex and expensive contemporaries comes with respect to close-up performance. Its relatively simple focusing mechanism means that it can’t maintain the same level of sharpness at short range and large apertures, giving hazy images due to spherical aberration. If you want crisp shots at less than a metre, you’ll need to stop down to f/4 at least. But then again, the close-focusing specialist Zeiss Batis 40mm F2 CF costs £1000 and is twice the length and weight, so pick your poison.

Nikon Z 40mm f.2 close-range sample at f/11

If you want crisp images at close distances, you’ll need to stop down the aperture. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/60sec at f/11, ISO 100

Nikon’s in-camera processing is excellent at suppressing chromatic aberration, so you won’t see any troublesome colour fringing in your JPEG files. If you make the mistake of disabling Auto distortion control in-camera, you will see a little barrel distortion, but it’s really nothing to worry about. Likewise raw files include correction metadata for both chromatic aberration and distortion, which is automatically applied by Adobe raw conversion software.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 sample image

Even in the worst-case scenarios, only a little colour fringing is visible. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/50sec at f/8, ISO 4500

One aspect where the lens falls short is with regard to vignetting. Normally I don’t mind a little corner darkening; more often than not, it’s a good thing for framing your subject. But with the 40mm f/2, the fall-off pattern is quite abrupt and severe, which means it can look distracting and unattractive. I’d recommend ensuring that Vignette Control is set to Normal to suppress the effect.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 review 6

Vignetting can be pronounced at f/2, with abrupt light falloff in the corners. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/640s at f/2, ISO 100

On a more positive note, I saw barely any problems when shooting into the light, with minimal ghosting or loss of contrast. Stop the aperture down to f/11 or f/16, and you can get some rather nice sunstars in favourable situations. But when the sun is very bright in a clear sky, it’s also possible to get unsightly coloured mosaic artefacts.

Nikon Z 40mm f2 flare and sunstar sample

Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/125sec at f/16, ISO 100

While the lens is capable of delivering quite strongly blurred backgrounds, I’m not a huge fan of its bokeh when shot wide open at f/2. Blur circles can often to be bright-edged, and take on odd shapes towards the edges and corners of the frame. If you’re after smooth background blur, sometimes it can be better to stop down to f/2.8.

Nikon Z 40mm f2 bokeh example

Bokeh isn’t terrible, but it’s not super-smooth either. Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/80sec at f/2, ISO 100

All told, though, the Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 produces very decent images, especially when you take into account its bargain price.

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2: Our Verdict

I can be tempting to overlook inexpensive lenses like the Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 and assume that with its simpler optics and plastic mount, it won’t be up to much. But in this case, that would be a huge mistake. Because while Nikon may have cut some costs in the design, it’s done so in a very sensible, well-judged way. The result is a lovely little lens that’s capable of giving fine results.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 in use

The Nikon Z 40mm f.2 is a fine lens that punches well above its weight and price point

Naturally the Nikon 40mm f/2 does have its limitations, but in practice they’re relatively few and minor. And in return, its compact size and light weight mean you can happily carry it around all day, while the weather-resistant construction means you don’t have to worry about using it in unfavourable weather.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 sample image

Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/50sec at f/2, ISO 180

Nikon has to be applauded for being prepared to make compromises to achieve the smaller size and lower price of its compact primes; not just the 40mm f/2, but the 28mm f/2.8 as well. Over the past decade or so, manufacturers seem to have become obsessed with making large, complex and expensive lenses, in a bid to deliver corner-to-corner sharpness at all apertures and focus distances. Such optics certainly have their place, but not to the exclusion of everything else.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 sample

Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/40sec at f/11, ISO 100

I’m not going to pretend that the 40mm f/2 is the best lens I’ve reviewed this year. But thanks to its combination of decent optics, reasonably bright aperture, portability and responsive AF, it’s one that I’ve really enjoyed using. In many respects it me reminds me of the Samyang AF 45mm F1.8 FE, and to get sharper optics at this size you’d have to sacrifice maximum aperture, as with the Sony FE 40mm F2.5 G.

Nikon Z 40mm f/2 sample image

Nikon Z7, Nikon Z 40mm f/2, 1/30sec at f/11, ISO 100

Ultimately the Nikon Z 40mm f/2 comes highly recommended, not only to Z system users who don’t already have a native standard prime, but also to those who’d like a smaller and lighter alternative to S-line optics.

4.5 stars

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2: Full Specifications

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 on the Nikon Z7

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Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm F/2 Lens Review

Nikon Nikkor Z 40mm F/2 Lens Review

Nikon NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2
 

Nikon’s Z system of cameras and lenses is steadily growing and now offers a very strong range that consistently nails it in terms of quality. Some of the lenses, especially the premium S range, are expensive, but now some new, very affordable optics are emerging. The Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 SE has already been reviewed and found to be superb, and hot on its heels we have the Nikkor Z 40mm f/2, similarly compact, light through the use of plastics, but this time without the overtly retro styling. It will be fascinating to see if it proves to be as good as the 28mm, so let’s couple it up with the full-frame 45MP Nikon Z7 II and find out.

 

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Nikkor Z 40mm f/2 Handling and Features

Nikon NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2
 

The lens is light, weighing in at 170g, made possible by the extensive use of plastics including the mount. Construction quality is excellent and there is some dust and water sealing that will enable use in more situations. Nikon qualifies this on their website by saying water sealing is not guaranteed under all circumstances. This leaves us making a judgement as to how much rain, for example, is too much rain, but it has to be better than no sealing.

Intended for both full-frame (FX) and crop sensor (DX) Nikon Z cameras, on the crop sensor the “35mm equivalent” field of view equates to 60mm. This leaves the lens being a “wide standard” on full-frame and a short telephoto on APS-C. Both options are useful and in fact, 40mm lenses seem to be making a bit of a comeback.

Starting our tour of the lens at the front, there is no provided lens hood, always a shame, and for what it would cost including one would be a nice touch. There is a standard 52mm filter thread. Looking into the front element, the 9 bladed diaphragm can be clearly seen, making a very smooth rounded aperture.

There is only one control on the lens, the smooth electronic manual focusing ring. In fact, this control ring can be programmed by the camera and there are several function options. Focus, in AF or MF, is the default and we have the alternative options of aperture adjustment, exposure compensation and ISO. Not all may be available with all camera bodies.

 

Nikon NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2

 

Focusing is down to 0.29m, or 0.96 feet, for a maximum magnification of 0.17x. AF is driven by an impressively quiet stepping motor that is no slouch in finding the point of focus. Accuracy appears to be good, so the image snaps into focus efficiently.

Optical construction is just 6 elements in 4 groups, including 2 aspheric. We might expect from this a lens showing high contrast images and very little flare. There is no VR (Vibration Reduction) built into the lens, so we rely on VR in the camera bodies. Not all the Nikon Z bodies have this.

The lens is so simple to use that it becomes a simple extension of our eyes and the 40mm focal length gives a natural view of the world. It is very close to the theoretical standard lens for 35mm-format, which would be 43mm, calculated using a measurement of the diagonal of the format. If used on APS-C, then a 60mm-equivalent field of view is a slightly different beast, but still very useful. Of course, very early f/2 standard lenses were often 58mm, so a 60mm is not too far away from that.

Apart from the aesthetics of the image, the lens also has the merit of being extremely light and easy to carry for as long as it takes without fatigue. We are into the realms of compact travel lenses and there is much to be said for travelling light.

Nikon NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2
 

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Nikon Is Developing The Nikkor Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S Super-Telephoto Prime Lens

Nikon Is Developing The Nikkor Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S Super-Telephoto Prime Lens

Nikon is pleased to announce the development of the Nikkor Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S for full-frame mirrorless cameras.

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Interchangeable Lenses

NIKKOR Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S super-telephoto prime lens with a built-in 1.4x teleconverter

 

Nikon has a new Nikkor Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S super-telephoto prime lens with a built-in 1.4x teleconverter for the Nikon Z mount system in the works. 

This is the first Nikkor Z super-telephoto prime lens to feature in the S-Line of Nikkor Z lenses and will feature a built-in 1.4x teleconverter and a new coating that delivers the highest anti-reflection performance in the history of Nikkor lenses. 

No more information has currently been released about the Nikkor Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S but you can read about the new Nikon Z9 camera which we have all of the latest details on. 

 


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Nikon Intros Nikkor Z 100-400mm & 24-120mm Lenses

Photo of Nikon 100-400mm lens

Along with announcing the much-anticipated Nikon Z9 camera this morning, the company also unveiled two new Nikkor Z zoom lenses: the Nikkor Z 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 VR S and the Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S. Both new optics are premium S-line lenses, which are Nikon’s top-of-the-line glass in this category.

Nikon also introduced the new Mount Adapter FTZ II, which is “a streamlined solution to seamlessly adapt F-mount lenses with the integrated vertical grip on the new Nikon Z 9.”

The new Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S will sell for $1099, and the Nikkor Z 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 VR S will go for $2699. The Mount Adapter FTZ II will be available for $249.

As with the Z9, Nikon didn’t announce a specific date when these products will ship, saying only that they will be “available later this year.”

Nikkor Z 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 VR S Lens

Photo of Nikon 100-400mm lens

  • Designed for sports and wildlife photography
  • At 1355 grams, it’s the lightest zoom lens in its class, according to Nikon
  • Built with a small 80-degree rotation angle and new “Inner Balance Technology,” which minimizes the weight shift caused by zooming
  • Minimal focus breathing, according to Nikon
  • 5.5 stops of optical Vibration Reduction (VR)
  • First super-telephoto zoom lens in the Nikkor Z lineup that covers a focal length range from 100 to 400mm
  • Multi-focusing system that utilizes two STMs (stepping motors), designed to enable fast, precise and quiet AF operation for both stills and videos
  • Employs an optical vibration reduction function with an effect equivalent to a shutter speed 5.5 stops faster, which is the highest among NIKKOR Z lenses
  • While lateral chromatic aberration is optically corrected, axial chromatic aberration is also significantly reduced via the adoption of Super ED glass and ED glass elements, providing clear images across the entire frame from maximum aperture
  • Nikon’s original Nano Crystal Coat and ARNEO Coat are both adopted to reduce ghost and flare effects even in backlit situations
  • With the attachment of teleconverters, the focal length can be extended to 560mm and 800mm
  • Features the highest maximum reproduction ratio of 0.38x (at the maximum telephoto position) in its class that lets users shoot flowers and insects in large size, with a minimum focusing distance of 0.75M (2.46 feet) to allow users to get closer to their subjects
  • The shortest rotation angle of 80 degrees in its class for the zoom ring enables users to rotate the zoom ring from the wide-angle position to the telephoto position in just one motion, without adjusting lens holding
  • Click-less control ring designed to offer smooth operation and reduced operational sound during video recording
  • Features a design with consideration for video recording, including effectively reduced shifting of a focus position when zooming in or out and the angle of view when adjusting focus.
  • Superior dust- and drip-resistant capability, with “high reliability that comes from both robustness and weather resistance, and excellent anti-fouling performance via the employment of fluorine coat”
  • Price: $2699
  • Availability: Later this year
  • You can pre-order the Nikkor Z 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 VR S at B&H here

Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S Lens

Photo of Nikon 24-120mm lens

  • Designed for landscapes, events, weddings and portraits
  • Weighing 630 grams, this is the lightest lens in its class, according to Nikon
  • High maximum reproduction ratio of 0.39x at the maximum telephoto position and a short minimum focus distance of 0.35m (at the max wide-angle), letting users get close and shoot small subjects in large size
  • Multi-focusing system that utilizes two STM (stepping motors), designed to enable fast, precise, and quiet AF operation for both stills and videos
  • Effective compensation for chromatic aberration with the employment of three ED glass, one aspherical ED glass, and three aspherical lens elements in the optical system.
  • Nikon’s original Nano Crystal Coat and ARNEO Coat are both adopted to effectively reduce ghost and flare effects even in backlit situations
  • Click-less control ring designed to offer smooth operation and reduced operational sound during video recording.
  • Features a design with consideration for video recording, including effectively reduced focus shift.
  • Designed with superior dust- and drip-resistant capability, and achieves excellent anti-fouling performance with the employment of fluorine coating, according to Nikon
  • Price: $1099
  • Availability: Later this year
  • You can pre-order the Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S at B&H here.

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Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S Lens Announced

Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S Lens Announced

Z24 120 4 Angle3 |
 

From ancient architecture and lively street photography to detailed portraits and sweeping landscapes, the new Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S is the perfect zoom lens for a wide variety of photographers. 

Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S Features: 

  • A wide to mid-telephoto zoom lens
  • Constant aperture of f/4
  • Consistent zoom across video and stills
  • A short minimum focusing distance and 0.39 maximum reproduction ratio
  • Little to no focus breathing
  • Customisable controls, featuring a dedicated function button and control ring
  • Lightweight and compact body
  • Multi-focusing system, using two AF drive units
  • ARNEO Coat and Nano Crystal Coat
  • Sealed to protect from dust and drips, including Nikon’s Fluorine coating, repelling dirt 

Availability And Pricing: The Nikkor Z 24-120mm f/4 S will be available in Winter 2021 with an RRP of £1099. 

Nikon has also announced the release of the Nikon Z9 camera and the development of the Nikkor Z 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S lens. 

 

From Nikon UK:

Z7II 24 120 4 Front34l |
 

Nikon today introduces its latest zoom lens, the versatile NIKKOR Z 24-120mm f/4 S. With a lightweight build, advanced optics and a broad zoom range, this is the lens for any scenario. From ancient architecture and lively street photography to detailed portraits and sweeping landscapes, it allows users to capture all angles without having to change lens.

The NIKKOR Z 24-120mm f/4 S is a high-performance walkaround travel lens. Boasting a constant maximum aperture of f/4, it is built for controlled, creative shooting that delivers stunning detail. It provides smooth operability and a multi-focusing system that ensures incredibly fast and accurate autofocusing across the entire zoom range.

Combining high performance with a lightweight and compact body, the NIKKOR Z 24-120mm f/4 S is ‘travel ready’ for those shooting stills and video alike. It offers superb video performance with virtually no focus breathing, ensuring consistent framing when refocusing during recording. If the user is transitioning from interiors to exteriors, or between darker and lighter scenes, stable exposure control enables a natural shift in brightness for beautiful looking footage.

The lens’s ARNEO Coat and Nano Crystal Coat, meanwhile, combat ghosting and flare caused by incidental light coming from any direction, to ensure crystal clear shots.

Sealed to protect from dust and drips, the NIKKOR Z 24-120mm f/4 S includes Nikon’s Fluorine coating on the front element, which repels dirt and easily wipes clean.  


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Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm F/3.5-6.3 VR Lens Announced

Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm F/3.5-6.3 VR Lens Announced

Nikon adds a versatile DX zoom lens to its Nikkor Z range of lenses designed to be used with Nikon’s Z cameras.

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Interchangeable Lenses

Nikon Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR
Nikon has introduced a new zoom lens to its line-up of Nikkor Z DX lenses that has a zoom range from wide to telephoto and is compatible with Nikon Z cameras such as the Nikon Z50

The Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR is a versatile DX-format zoom lens that’s compact, lightweight and features a 7.8x zoom. It has a minimum focus distance of 0.20m, features vibration reduction as well as an electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism for precise aperture control and stable exposure control. It’s also sealed to protect it against dust and water. 

Price & Availability: The Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR will be available from November 2021 with an RRP of £599. 

 

Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR Features:

  • Compact and lightweight body
  • 7.8x zoom lens
  • A minimum focus distance of 0.20m at wide focal lengths
  • Vibration reduction mode, allowing the user to shoot at shutter speeds of up to 5 stops slower with no camera shake
  • Electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism, using signals from the camera for even more precise aperture control and consistently stable exposure control
  • Great for videos and stills, with easy-to-use controls
  • Sealed to protect from dust and drips

 

From Nikon UK:

Nikon today introduces the Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR, which offers superb image quality and versatility for those shooting at wide, standard, or telephoto focal lengths.

An ideal travel companion, the advanced DX lens has superior optics both when shooting at a distance and for closer shots, meaning it can be used in any photographic scenario – from sweeping landscapes to intricate portraits. 

Ideal for those who are progressing from smartphone photography, the easy-to-use lens removes the need for a sizeable kit bag. It weighs just 315 g and its 18-140 mm focal-length range delivers the optimum balance between the lightweight needed for superior portability and the ability to capture typical scenes while travelling. 

A built-in vibration reduction system, meanwhile, combats hand or camera shake, letting users shoot at shutter speeds of up to five stops slower. This results in crisp and blur-free images even in poor light situations, whether it is an atmospheric interior shot or shooting cityscapes at night.

The NIKKOR Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR also supports sharp and smooth video recording, adding to its ‘do everything’ lens status. Its autofocus is fast and performs brilliantly with the Z camera’s Eye-Detection AF, to keep focus right where it is needed. This results in beautiful footage from travels and adventures.

Designed to be protected against the elements, the DX lens includes effective sealing against dust and water drops, meaning it can be used in most environments. 

For more information visit the Nikon website.

 

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Nikon releases Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR all-in-one zoom

Nikon releases Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR all-in-one zoom

October 13, 2021

Nikon has announced a general-purpose all-in-one zoom for its DX-format (APS-C) mirrorless cameras, the Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR. Designed for use on cameras such as the Nikon Z 50 and Z fc, it offers a 27-210mm equivalent focal-length range. It should also be handy for close-ups, thanks to a minimum focus distance that ranges from 20cm at wideangle to 40cm at telephoto.

Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR on Nikon Zfc

The Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR on the Nikon Z fc

Billed as ‘the ideal travel companion’, its dust- and splash-proofed barrel is 90mm long and weighs just 315g. It features optical stabilisation that promises up to 5 stops of shake reduction for getting sharper shots without a tripod, and uses 62mm filters. Nikon says it’s equally well suited to stills and video shooting, with fast and silent autofocus.

The Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR is due to go on sale at the start of November for £599, and is the 21st lens to join the range of Z-Mount lenses.


Press release:

NIKON ADDS VERSATILE DX ZOOM LENS TO ITS NIKKOR Z RANGE

Nikon releases Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR all-in-one zoom 7

Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR on the Nikon Z 50

London, United Kingdom, 13th October 2021: Nikon today introduces the NIKKOR Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR, which offers superb image quality and versatility for those shooting at wide, standard, or telephoto focal lengths.

An ideal travel companion, the advanced DX lens has superior optics both when shooting at a distance and for closer shots, meaning it can be used in any photographic scenario – from sweeping landscapes to intricate portraits.

Ideal for those who are progressing from smartphone photography, the easy-to-use lens removes the need for a sizeable kit bag. It weighs just 315 g and its 18-140 mm focal-length range delivers the optimum balance between the light weight needed for superior portability and the ability to capture typical scenes while traveling.

A built-in vibration reduction system, meanwhile, combats hand or camera shake, letting users shoot at shutter speeds of up to five stops slower. This results in crisp and blur free images even in poor light situations, whether it is an atmospheric interior shot or shooting cityscapes at night.

The NIKKOR Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR also supports sharp and smooth video recording, adding to its ‘do-everything’ lens status. Its autofocus is fast and performs brilliantly with the Z camera’s Eye-Detection AF, to keep focus right where it is needed. This results in beautiful footage from travels and adventures.

Designed to be protected against the elements, the DX lens includes effective sealing against dust and water drops, meaning it can be used in most environments.

NIKKOR Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR – your perfect travel companion:

Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR

Nikkor Z DX 18-140mm f/3.5-6.3 VR

  • A versatile DX-format zoom lens with superior optics
  • Compact and lightweight body, perfect for when on the move
  • Powerful 7.8x zoom lens, bringing you closer to your subject than ever
  • Incredible minimum focus distance of 0.20 m at wide focal lengths
  • Vibration reduction mode, allowing user to shoot at shutter speeds of up to 5 stops slower with no camera shake
  • Electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism, using signals from the camera for even more precise aperture control and consistently stable exposure control
  • Great for videos and stills, with easy-to-use controls
  • Sealed to protect from dust and drips

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Nikkor Z 28mm F/2.8 SE Lens Review

Nikkor Z 28mm F/2.8 SE Lens Review

Nikkor Z 28mm F2/8 SE
 

Nikon have form when it comes to retro styling, first with the Df F mount body, and now with the Z fc and a small number of retro-styled lenses. We have looked at the 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 and now examine in detail the new Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 SE, a Special Edition lens that currently is only available as part of the Z fc SE kit in the UK. It is available separately in the USA. The new lens totally mimics the appearance of classic Nikon F SLR manual focus lenses, although it is in fact an AF lens. Not only does it appeal on a retro level, but its hidden secret is that it is in fact a full-frame optic. So let’s look at the new lens, using not only the APS-C 20.9 MP Nikon Z fc body but also the 45.7 MP Nikon Z 7 II.

Nikon Nikkor Z 28mm f/2.8 SE Handling and Features

Nikkor Z 28mm F2/8 SE
 

For the styling of the lens, it was back to the original blueprints for Nikon and the illusion is complete. The knurling of the manual focus ring, the silver ring behind that and the general shape are all genuinely Nikon F in appearance. Of course, we lose an aperture ring or meter coupler, but otherwise, traditionalists just might relate with enthusiasm to the overall ethos of the design.

Weighing in at just 160g, clearly, this is a lens using plastics extensively, including the mount. However, plastic can be a totally effective choice. There is no provided lens hood, always a shame, but there is a standard 52mm filter thread; the traditional Nikon size. The lens is dust and drip-resistant, a welcome decision.

The control ring can be set to control focus, aperture, exposure compensation or ISO. The feel of the ring seems very similar to what would be expected from any of the old F lenses, silky smooth. There are no other controls on the lens, everything else being controlled from the camera. There is therefore no AF/MF switch. There is also no option for VR (Vibration Compensation) and that function is blanked out in the camera menus. However, in-camera VR such as with the Nikon Z7 II works just fine.

Nikkor Z 28mm F2/8 SE

AF is driven by two stepping motors and is very fast, very quiet and very reliable. The focusing ring can be used to tweak the focus position after AF. Focusing is down to 0.19m, or 0.63 feet, for a maximum magnification of 0.2x, 1:5. This is close, but no closer than many traditional 28mm lenses.

Lens construction is 9 elements in 8 groups, including 2 Aspherical. IF (Internal Focusing) means the dimensions of the lens do not change. The diaphragm comprises 7 rounded blades.

The lens is only sold as part of the Z fc SE kit in the UK, although available separately in the USA. Of particular interest is that although it is supplied as part of a kit with an APS-C format camera body, it is in fact a full-frame lens. It works just as well with the Z 7 II body and the opportunity was taken to test it out on both DX and FX formats. The FX-format results in the native 28mm focal length as intended, a very useful wide-angle; the DX-format results in a “35mm-format equivalent” of 42mm. In terms of field of view, that 42mm is very close to the theoretical “standard lens” which for full-frame would be 43mm.

Either as a wide-angle, or as a slightly wide standard, depending as detailed above on the format, this is a totally lovely lens to use. It looks great, it works faultlessly and the results will speak for themselves. What’s not to like?

 

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NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2 Lens Announced For Nikon Z Mount System

NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2 Lens Announced For Nikon Z Mount System

NIKKOR Z 40mm F/2
 

Nikon has updated the lens line-up that’s compatible with the Z series of full-frame mirrorless cameras, such as the Nikon Z7 II, with the introduction of the NIKKOR Z 40mm f/2.

The new NIKKOR Z-mount lens is sharp, fast, small in size and perfect for portraits as the 9-blad aperture produces soft, natural-looking bokeh that makes the subject stand out. 

NIKKOR Z 40mm f/2 features:

  • Bright f/2 standard prime lens: 40 mm angle of view on Z series full-frame cameras. 60 mm angle of view on a Z series DX-format camera.
  • True to life: the lens renders stills and movies with beautiful detail, depth, and colour.
  • Artful bokeh: putting subjects in sharp focus against beautiful, softly blurred backgrounds has never been easier.
  • Great up close: minimum focus distance of just 0.29 m. Sharpness is superb, even up close.
  • Fast, silent autofocus: powered by an ultra-quiet stepping motor and enhanced by the additional light gathered by the Z mount, focusing is fast, accurate and silent.
  • Made for video: videos won’t be ruined by focusing sounds. Focus breathing is dramatically reduced so you can adjust focus without affecting the shot’s angle of view.
  • Pocketable: small enough to keep on the camera or slip into a coat pocket.
  • Adaptable: the silent control ring can be set to control focus, aperture, exposure compensation, or ISO.
  • Protected: sealed to protect from dust and water droplets

 

Pricing & Availability: The NIKKOR Z 40mm f/2 will be available from 30 September 2021 with an RRP of £249.

 

From Nikon UK:

Z50 40 2 Front34l |
 

Today, Nikon is pleased to announce the release of the NIKKOR Z 40mm f/2, a compact and lightweight prime lens compatible with full-frame (Nikon FX-format) mirrorless cameras for which the Nikon Z mount has been adopted. The beautifully lyrical NIKKOR Z 40mm f/2 is an everyday superhero: sharp, fast, and small enough to wield discreetly, it’s great for everything from vlogs to vibrant snapshots.

This bright, standard prime lens offers a natural angle of view that is ideal for candid portraits, interviews, and how-to videos. Without a big lens in their face, subjects will feel more comfortable, and the lens is so small and light that it’s ideal for filming engaging first-person perspectives too.

Z40 2 Angle2 |
 

The wide Z mount combines with the lens’ wide f/2 maximum aperture to deliver great low-light performance, ideal for capturing the mood of dimly lit situations. The rounded 9-blade aperture enables soft, natural-looking bokeh: photographers and movie shooters can capture images with softly blurred, super-creamy backgrounds that really make their subject stand out.

Rob Harmon, Senior Commercial Lead, Nikon Northern Europe, says: “We are thrilled to welcome this versatile prime lens into the ever-growing Nikon Z system. This lens is a great value-for-money entry point into the world of Nikon Z. It’s so compact and lightweight that it’s ideal as a main walk-around lens or a lightweight second lens.”

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Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm F/3.5-6.3 VR Lens Review

Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm F/3.5-6.3 VR Lens Review

Nikon Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR
 

The existing full-frame Nikkor Z lenses have fully established an enviable reputation and are clearly showing Nikon at the top of their game. We now have a number of APS-C format Nikon Z cameras, and of course, some new lenses specifically designed for them. The Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR is available separately in black, or in silver as part of the Nikon Z fc SL kit, where it is coupled with the retro style Nikon Z fc camera body. It is with this 20MP body that we now look closely at what can only be described as a lens aspiring to be another “plastic fantastic”. Does it make the grade? Let’s find out.

 

Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR Handling and Features

Nikon Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR
 

We are looking separately at the Nikon Z fc body, but for now, the new lens in silver can be seen to be a perfect style match for that retro look. It is very compact, the lens having a retractable construction. It must be extended to the 16mm zoom position for use, and if we do not do so then the camera will remind us. Through the extensive use of plastics, the lens is also very light, weighing in at a minuscule 135g. There is no hood provided, but a clip-on hood HN-40 is available as an optional extra. It is always a pity to see the hood excluded as the protection afforded to the front of the lens is extremely valuable, as well as of course helping the resistance to flare. There is a standard 46mm filter thread, quite a small size and not all filter types will be readily available.

The zoom ring extends the lens and is smooth without being silky smooth. There are clear markings at 16mm, 24mm, 35mm and 50mm. These are the actual focal lengths, and the lens relates to a “35mm-equivalent” field of view of 24-75mm, a versatile range for general purpose shooting. The lens could be used on full-frame Z cameras, the mount is the same, but it would be in DX crop mode and the cameras give no choice on that.

There is also a slim control ring for manual focusing. It can also be programmed to alter aperture or exposure compensation. This is electronic and very smooth in operation, as would be expected.

 

Nikon Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR
 

 

Focusing is down to 0.2m, or 8 inches, for a maximum magnification of 0.25x, or 1:4. This close focusing adds considerably to the general usefulness. AF is driven by a stepping motor and is blisteringly fast. It is also extremely quiet and accurate. AF is switched on and off via the menus, so there is no AF/MF switch on the lens itself.

Optical construction is 9 elements in 7 groups, including 1 ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) and 4 Aspherical. The diaphragm has 7 rounded blades, aimed at producing lovely, smooth bokeh.

VR (Vibration Reduction) is built-in, and this is switched on and off from within the camera menus. There are standard and sport settings available. It is claimed that 4 stops advantage is possible, and that can be confirmed.

 

Nikon Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR
 

The one regrettable omission is that there is no moisture or dust resistance, but on the other hand, the lens itself is absolutely brilliant to use. It’s admittedly very plastic in its construction, and that even extends to the plastic lens mount, but it is well put together and the handling is just superb. Combined with the retro Z fc or perhaps with the Z50 it makes an ideal compact travelling companion.

 

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