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Nikon Z 9 Will Officially Launch Tomorrow October 28th

Nikon Z 9 Will Officially Launch Tomorrow October 28th

Well, the moment all Nikon shooters have been waiting for has finally arrived. The new flagship Z 9 arrives tomorrow.

For professional photographers and longtime Nikonians, this has been an eagerly awaited release. Unlike Nikon’s existing mirrorless offerings, the Z 6II and Z 7II, along with their predecessors, the Z 9 is unequivocally expected to be the top of the line. We’ve already seen hints at its power in a trio of teaser commercials Nikon has released over the last month. The first teaser highlighted the articulation of the rear LCD screen. The second brought wildlife to the foray and the camera’s ability to shoot 8K video, beyond the historically arbitrary limit of a half-hour, without suffering from overheating. The third trailer showed off the camera’s new tracking autofocus system for sports and action photographers. And today, the company launched a fourth trailer that highlights the camera’s ability to shoot blackout-free. You can check out the fourth and final teaser at this link.

But, teasers aside, what kind of firepower will the Z 9 actually possess? Well, you can find out at the live launch event at 8:00 a.m. ET on Thursday, October 28th, at Nikon’s site or via their YouTube channel.

Will Nikon deliver on its promises? Will this be the camera that convinces any Nikon shooter on the fence about switching to mirrorless to take the leap?  Will this camera immediately catapult Nikon to the top of the heap in the professional mirrorless space? We don’t have long to wait to find out.

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 3 October 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 3 October 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

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Competitions

Spoon with liquid

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to 2008 (Day 22 – ‘Kitchen Item‘) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 16

Fallen Leaves

 

Day 17

Autumn Macros

Two

 

Day 18

Backlight

Bath time

 

Day 19

Cross Polarisation

 

Day 20

Vista and View

Buachaille Etive Mor

 

Day 21

Bad Weather Landscapes

 

Day 23

Busy Theme

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

 

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Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 1

Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


Art Wolfe on his Approach to Night Photography – Amateur Photographer

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 2
Leopard (Panthera pardus) in thorn tree (Vachellia sp.), Chobe National Park, Ngamiland, Botswana. The gnarled branches of an ancient thorn tree play host to a resting leopard. Canon EOS 5D, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM lens, f/5.6 for 1/500 second, ISO 400 © Art Wolfe

Art Wolfe, who just turned 70, has been capturing wildlife, landscapes and people for nearly half a century. Earlier before the arrival of COVID-19, he was out of the house for more than nine months every year.

His latest book, Night on Earth, is a wide-ranging collection of travel images made in the hours between dusk and dawn and taken in various locations worldwide, including Alaska, Namibia, Malaysia, India and the Galapagos Islands.

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 3
Golden Gate Bridge photographed from Marin County headlands looking south to San Francisco, California. Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, EF24-70mm f/4L IS USM lens, f/14 for 8 seconds, ISO 1000 © Art Wolfe

“I love it,” he tells Amateur Photographer. “The whole technology of the mirrorless camera permits much smaller lenses.

“For instance, when I was in Kenya earlier this year, I was handholding an RF 100-500mm f/4.5-7.1 lens and very easily capturing animals [on the Canon EOS R5.] Then I could add a 1.4x extender, and suddenly I have a 700mm lens that’s very easy to hold. I’m not a gym queen, so handholding and shooting animals without a tripod really makes capturing the ephemeral moment so much easier.

“Historically, if I’d wanted to shoot a night-time shot that includes the stars, they would all be star trails…With film, you could never take a fast enough shutter speed to show the stars were just pinpoints of light…Today, with high ISOs, I have been able to shoot amazingly detailed images of the Milky Way as part of night-time landscapes.”

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 4
Full moon at dawn over tufa fairy chimneys, Cappadocia, Turkey. Canon EOS-3, EF17-35mm lens, f/11 for 1/30 second, Fujichrome Provia film © Art Wolfe

Read also: Building a Photo Brand From the Ground Up: Tips from Art Wolfe


The Images That Tell the True Story of the War in Afghanistan – Columbia Journalism Review

Embed from Getty Images

From CJR
Images from Afghanistan have always revealed the truth behind the notion that the American war was on solid footing. We may have been told, since it first began shortly after September 11, 2001, that significant progress was just around the bend. But the pictures showed something else.

There are few pictures in this article from the second decade of the war. By October 2015, with the ground war largely replaced by airpower, the conflict barely registered in the US. The American accidental bombing of the Médecins Sans Frontières Trauma Center in Kunduz might have been overlooked too if photographer Andrew Quilty hadn’t been there to document the horror and “the man on the operating table.”


A Photographer Captured NYC’s Most Glamorous Dogs Picnicking in Central Park and Sunbathing on Top of Skyscrapers — Insider

 

In his latest series, photographer Gray Malin took some of the city’s cutest models and photographed them in some of its most famous locations. The result? An adorable, fun-loving collection of doggone glitz.

“Shooting in Manhattan can be notoriously difficult, but Malin was able to finagle permission to shoot at must-see locations like Rockefeller Center and The Plaza Hotel in addition to Bergdorf’s and Central Park,” writes Travel + Leisure.

You can see Malin’s new series and his other work on his website. 


Trove of Unseen Photos Documents Indigenous Culture in 1920s Alaska — Smithsonian

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 5
Diomede Mother and Child

Edward S. Curtis: Unpublished Alaska, the Lost Photographs, at the Muskegon Museum of Art in Michigan features recently discovered photos taken during the photographer’s 1927 voyage to Alaska, displayed alongside notes from his personal journals.

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 6
Edward Curtis and daughter Beth in a kayak

Per a statementCurtis was a photographer and ethnologist who documented the lives of Indigenous peoples in America’s Southwest, West and Northwest during the early 20th century.

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 7
Four Happy Nunivak Women
Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 8
Ju-kuls (Lena Wesley), Nunivak

Native News Online points out that Curtis often tried to depict Indigenous people as they were 200 to 300 years before European colonization. He removed objects like clocks and modern vehicles from his snapshots, staged ceremonies and dances, and dressed his subjects in outfits they wouldn’t typically wear.

All photos courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art in Muskegon, Michigan.


How Can You be a Colorblind Photographer? – Photofocus

“Why does that dog look green?” asked a young man of his parents.

That comment led to his parents discovering that their child was red-green colorblind. Years later, Ken Lee is now a colorblind night photographer.

Lee has one book published with two more on the way. His images have appeared in National Geographic Books, Omni magazine, Los Angeles Times, Westways magazine and numerous other publications.


10 Lessons from the Masters of Portrait Photography

English portrait photographer Alex Kilbee shares ten lessons learnt from master portrait photographers:
Martin Schoeller
Yousuf Karsh
Robert Mapplethorpe
Richard Avedon
Dan Winters
Arnold Newman
Nadar
Andy Gotts
Bill Brandt


How to Make Your Own Photo Book – Amateur Photographer

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 9
Depositphotos

Creating a photo book can feel like tackling a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle in your head. To ease the strain, Tracy Calder asked three book-loving professionals to spill the beans about costs, collaboration, and content when making your own photo book.


USB-C Cables are Getting New, Confusing Logos for Faster 240W Charging Standard – The Verge

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 10
Depositphotos

Also, Report Says MacBook Pro USB-C Ports Don’t Support Fast Charging


Film on the Life of Model-Turned-WWII Photographer Lee Miller – Deadline

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 11
War correspondent, U.S. Army Official Photograph, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Lee Miller traded a glamorous career as a Vogue cover model and muse to artists like Man Ray for a dangerous career as an American WWII photographer. She chronicled the fighting on the allied front lines and exposed the atrocities that Hitler’s Nazi Germany perpetrated on Jews in concentration camps.

“I’m surprised that a film has never been made about this incredible woman …,” actor Kate Winslet who plays Miller in the film Lee, told Deadline. “She has been misunderstood and so often viewed through the lens of a man, through a male gaze, because she started her life as a model and was very beautiful.

“When you mention Lee Miller, you might first hear Man Ray…What she did, as a female photographer on the front lines during WWII, so much of what was documented was not just giving a voice to the voiceless, but it was educating people on what actually happened during the war…You have to remember, people were trying to cover it up…British Vogue would not print Lee’s photos of the liberation of Dachau because … they were told that by the Ministry of Information that it was not what the country needed at that time…”


Bullfighting Is Still Happening. These Photos Show Why It Shouldn’t Be – Feature Shoot

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 12
Bullfighting. Corrida in Pamplona, Navarra, Spain, Depositphotos

The Week in 37 photos — CNN

Embed from Getty Images
96-year-old defendant Irmgard F., a former secretary for the SS commander of the Stutthof concentration camp, sits in a wheelchair as she is led into the courtroom at the start of her trial in Itzehoe, northern Germany, on October 19, 2021. – The first woman to be prosecuted for Nazi-era crimes in decades, Irmgard F. is charged with complicity in the murder of more than 10,000 people at the Stutthof camp in occupied Poland. However, an arrest warrant was issued by the court in the northern town of Itzehoe after Furchner left the retirement home where she lives on September 30, 2021, as her trial was set to begin and headed to a metro station. (Photo by Christian Charisius / POOL / AFP) (Photo by CHRISTIAN CHARISIUS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)


More Photographers Oppose MGM’s Refusal to Release Minamata (Based on Photographer W. Eugene Smith) in North America — WSWS

Embed from Getty Images
Minamata is a new movie focusing on the industrial poisoning of Japanese fishing communities in Minamata, Japan. It depicts the courageous work by acclaimed photo-essayist W. Eugene Smith (played by Johnny Depp) and his wife Aileen Mioko Smith to expose this crime before a global audience during the early 1970s.

MGM purchased the distribution rights to the film for North America but has not screened it in the US. Amazon, which has struck a deal to acquire MGM for $8.5 billion, has not given any indication when it will be released.

“In July, director Andrew Levitas issued an open letter revealing that he had been told by MGM’s acquisitions head Sam Wollman that the company was ‘burying’ Minamata over concerns that ‘the personal issues of Johnny Depp,’ could reflect negatively on MGM,” as reported by WSWS.


Photographer Jamel Shabazz on Life in 1980s NYC and Using His Camera to Connect With His Community – My Modern Met

Photographer Jamel Shabazz picked up his first camera at age fifteen and started to document his peers. He has been photographing New York and its hip-hop culture for decades. In 2018 he received the Gordon Parks Foundation Award for documentary photography.


 How Photos from the Battle of Antietam Revealed the American Civil War’s Horrors — History

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 13
The “Sunken Road” at Antietam, stereograph showing dead Confederate soldiers in a ditch on the battlefield at Antietam, MD., Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer. Photo from Library of Congress.

The Battle of Antietam was a battle of the American Civil War where American war dead were photographed for the first time. 22,700 Union and Confederate soldiers were killed, wounded, missing, or captured in the battle, which was fought outside the small, western Maryland town of Sharpsburg.

“Mr. [Mathew] Brady [photographer] has done something to bring home to us the terrible reality and earnestness of war,” The New York Times of Oct 20, 1862, reported. “If he has not brought bodies and laid them in our dooryards and along the streets, he has done something very like it.”

The photographer who captured The Dead of Antietam was Alexander Gardner, a Scottish immigrant who managed Brady’s Washington gallery. Gardner has been reported to have rearranged bodies. Gardner’s interest in photography started when in 1851 while visiting The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, London, he saw Brady’s photographs.

Gardner and Brady’s main objective was to sell photos. Sales were good with civil war stereographs and Album Gallery Cards selling for 50 cents ($10.67 in 2020 dollars) each during the war. Scenic stereographs of Niagara Falls would sell for only 25 cents each.


Great Read From the Past – 2014 

How Photojournalism Killed Kevin Carter – All That’s Interesting

Warning: Some photos in this article are graphic.

When this photograph capturing the suffering of the Sudanese famine was published in The New York Times on March 26, 1993, the reader reaction was intense and not all positive.

Some people said that Kevin Carter, the photojournalist who took this photo, was inhumane, that he should have dropped his camera to run to the little girl’s aid. The controversy only grew when, a few months later, he won the Pulitzer Prize for the photo. By the end of July 1994, he was dead.

Read also: The Ethics of Photojournalism


Photo of the Week

Embed from Getty Images


Quiz of the Week

1.) Photographer Diane Arbus received an obituary in The New York Times
a.) 2 weeks after her death
b.) 46 years after her death
c.) 8 months after her death
d.) She has never received an obituary

2.) Sony unveiled a new flash HVL-F60RM2 capable of firing up to 10 frames per second for 200 consecutive flashes. Impressive! At what power setting is this possible?

3.) Eastman Kodak shipped more than 1.5 million Brownies in the first year of production. What did it cost in 1900 when it was released?

Answers
1.) (b.) 46 years after her death. Reason per NYT: “OVERLOOKED. Since 1851, obituaries in The New York Times have been dominated by white men. Now, we’re adding the stories of other remarkable people.”

2.) 1/32 flash output level, Ni-MH batteries using the mechanical shutter

3.) $1 (equivalent to $32.66 in today’s dollars)


Why I Like This Photo — Amit Eshel

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 14
© Amit Eshel

I like this image for the emotion it conveys in the bear’s look, the seagull in the background, and the way the pastel colors blend beautifully and create an optimistic feeling despite the melancholy mood.

I shot it in Katmai National Park in Alaska in early October 2020 at the peak of the fall colors and was overwhelmed by the diversity and beauty of the remote environment.

Knowing the story of this bear cub connects me even more to emotion. She was born to an old mother estimated to be around 25 years old. This cub had no other brothers or sisters to play with. All this cub wanted was to play with other cubs, and with many salmon available in the river this year, many bear families have come in close contact near the river mouth. The cub expressed curiosity towards other bear families and sometimes was able to play with cubs from other litters. Mother bears are very protective about their own cubs and usually do not allow them to play with other females’ cubs.

In early September, she encountered a porcupine and has since suffered from quills stuck in the bottom of a front paw. She was hobbled and avoided placing weight on the injured paw for a couple of weeks, and at times the future did not look very promising for her, but I’m happy to tell the cub is well-positioned to recover from the injury caused by the porcupine quills completely. As this cub has shown, the life of a spring cub contains risk as well as moments of joy.

I have taken this shot from the water level perspective using a floating hide. I love shooting from eye level of the subject to create an intimate feeling. The light was so soft, and the colors of the water and the trees in the far background came out so beautiful. I have used my widest aperture to lead the eye to the melancholy look of the bear, and the seagull was just in the right distance to be softly out of focus but still very present in the composition.

It was shot on Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x at 560mm 1/1000, f5.6, ISO 800.

Amit Eshel is an award-winning wildlife photographer and photography tour leader from Israel. Since he was a young child, he has been drawing, and animals have always been a source of inspiration. With a BA in illustration, animation, and graphic design, he combined his love for art and nature to begin a career creating animal-inspired jewelry using photos of wildlife as a tool to capture special moments as models for his designs. Once Eshel fell in love with photography, his life was changed forever.


Quote of the WeekCornell Capa

Great Reads in Photography: October 24, 2021 15
JFK during a campaign event. New York City, USA. October 19, 1960 © Cornell Capa © International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos, photo courtesy of Magnum

The above photo of Cornell Capa is from On The Horizon: The Magnum Square Print Sale, in Partnership with Aperture of over 80 signed or estate-stamped 6×6 prints available here.

I am not an artist, and I never intended to be one. I hope I have made some good photographs.* – Cornell Capa

*From: Cornell Capa: Photographs, Bulfinch Press, 1st ed, 1992.

Cornell Capa (1918–2008) was the founder of the International Center of Photography, NY., in 1974 to champion “concerned photography”—socially and politically minded images that can educate and change the world. In 1954 – after the death of his brother, photojournalist Robert Capa while covering the war in French Indochina – Cornell Capa resigned from the Life staff and joined Magnum, the international cooperative photo agency that Robert had helped to found.


To see an archive of past issues of Great Reads in Photography, click here.


We welcome comments as well as suggestions. As we cannot possibly cover each and every source, if you see something interesting in your reading or local newspaper anywhere in the world, kindly forward the link to us here. ALL messages will be personally acknowledged.


About the author: Phil Mistry is a photographer and teacher based in Atlanta, GA. He started one of the first digital camera classes in New York City at The International Center of Photography in the 90s. He was the director and teacher for Sony/Popular Photography magazine’s Digital Days Workshops. You can reach him via email here.


Image credits: All photographs as credited and used with permission from the photographers or agencies. Portions of header photo via Depositphotos.

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Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021 16

Every day, the PetaPixel Instagram account is sharing excellent photography from our readers and those who inspire us. Here’s a look at some of our recent favorite posts and the photographers behind the lens.

Our @PetaPixel Instagram page has been posting all the great work that finds its way in front of our eyes. Want to see your photos shared on our account? First, you’ll want to follow us. Then use the #petapixel hashtag in your posts to join our Instagram community of photographers. These steps let us easily find what to share.

Below, we recognize a selection of talented photographers who recently had their work featured on @PetaPixel. Keep posting your images with #petapixel and you could find yourself here next week.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021 17

Ross Schram von Haupt, or simply @ross_schram on Instagram, is a 27-year-old landscape photographer based in Bellingham, Washington. “My goal as a photographer is to try and capture scenes in a way that evokes an emotion or feeling,” Schram von Haupt said. “I am always trying to find the perfect conditions for a shot where the light, time of year, weather, and more all come together.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021 18

Lance Reis, whose work can be seen on Instagram as @kickassdesigns, is a Portland-based photographer specializing in lifestyle portraits and business photography. Reis declares to have three addictions: photography, travel, and coffee. He has been published by Vogue as well as local and international news.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021 19

Bryce Mironuck, found on Instagram as @brycemironuck_photography, is a Saskatchewan-based landscape photographer. Mironuck told PetaPixel that he had always been an off-and-on again photographer until finding his way into Milky Way photography. “I realized that one of the few things I could do here in my home province of Saskatchewan is do Milky Way photography,” he said. “After completing one of my first Milky Way images, it was the first time I was able to see potential in my own work, and gave me the drive to continue.” Additional work can be viewed on his website.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021 20

Darren White, or @darren_white_photography on Instagram, is a landscape and astro photographer from the Pacific Northwest who now resides in the Denver area. Amazed at the wonders of nature, White is often looking for beautiful scenery or under the dark starry skies. This particular photo was shot in Southwest Colorado during the peak of fall color.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 22, 2021 21

Zhuo Ya, known on Instagram as @zhuoyanz, is a New Zealand-based wedding and portrait photographer with a style that’s characterized as “emotional, whimsical, and elegant.” He began a career in photography in 2002 and has since traveled the world to continue learning about the process. Ya said, “To me, wedding photography is a special relationship between the photographer and the couple; connecting on an emotional level is key to capturing meaningful moments and creating beautiful portraits.”


Be sure to follow us on Instagram to see more work from photographers like you and tag photos with #petapixel for them to be considered for a feature.


Image credits: All photographs used with the permission of their respective photographers.

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The Best Photography Offers & Products From Companies Supporting ePz In October (And Beyond)

The Best Photography Offers & Products From Companies Supporting ePz In October (And Beyond)

The Best Photography Offers & Products From Companies Supporting ePz In October (And Beyond) 22

We round up the best offers, deals and new products available from companies supporting ePHOTOzine in October. 

You can read more about the offers and new products below. Plus, for more information, click the orange buttons. 

New Vanguard VEO 3T Travel Tripod Series

New Vanguard VEO 3T Travel Tripod Series

Vanguard introduces a new travel tripod that allows you to photograph, or video with your camera or smartphone, making it ideal for photographers and vloggers on the go. For more information on the new VEO 3T series, click the button below. #MakeUpYourOwnMind.

Learn More

 

My-Picture Personalised Bedding

My-Picture.co.uk Introduces Personalised Bedding (+ Free Pillowslip)

Looking for an alternative to the same old high-street bed linen? The custom printing specialists at My-Picture.co.uk have got you covered! Their new personalised bedding will let you explore your creative side and bring some personalised style to your bedroom design.

 

At My-Picture.co.uk you can design a personalised duvet cover or pillowslip – or go for a matching set. You can also take advantage of their special offer – buy a duvet cover and get a pillowslip free!

 

All the items come with a richly detailed full-area print, featuring vibrant colours that will revitalize any bedroom. The bed linen itself is indulgently soft and cosy – so you can make a design statement in the daytime and look forward to some blissful slumber at night.

 

Sound good? Visit My-Picture.co.uk by clicking the button below to design your own unique set of bed linen!

Visit My-Picture

Sweet Christmas Countdown

Sweet Christmas Countdown!

Pixum’s photo advent calendars are guaranteed to bring a smile to the faces of friends and family during the festive season,” ePHOTOzine.

Sweeten up the Christmas countdown for your loved ones or for yourself – it’s such a delight. Customise your advent calendar with your best photo on the front cover, caption, and a festive sticker – ready in no time at all! Choose between Ferrero or kinder chocolates, photos, or both!

Your family, friends, and even business partners will love this unique gift with your signature. Hurry to get yours – the season is quite short!

Go Design

Meike 50mm F1.2

Introducing The Meike 50mm F/1.2 Lens 

The Meike 50m f/1.2 is the perfect lens for night landscape photography as the large f/1.2 aperture benefits working in low-light conditions. Plus, with 10 aperture blades, it’s easy to create smooth and dreamy bokeh.

 

The full-frame manual focus lens allows shooting with subjects as close as 0.6m away.
 

Specifications: 

  •   Mount: E/EF/RF/Z/L
  •   Focal Length: 50MM
  •   Focus structure: Manual focus 
  •   Minimum Focusing Distance: 0.6m 
  •   Focus throw: 90°
  •   Lens Construction: 7 groups 12 elements 
  •   Max Aperture: F1.2
  •   Min Apertgth: F22
  •   Number of aperture blades: 10
  •   Full-Frame Angle of View:  Diagonal 47°, Horizontal 39°, Vertical  26°
  •   APS-C Angle of View: Diagonal 33°, Horizontal 26°, Vertical  17°
  •   Flter Size: ø67

Learn More Today 

The Best Photography Offers & Products From Companies Supporting ePz In October (And Beyond) 23

Buy & Sell Used Photo And Video Kit With MPB

ePHOTOzine has partnered with MPB to bring ePHOTOzine members fantastic offers on used photography gear as well as an easy route for you to sell your own photo and video kit to MPB.

 

MPB buy almost all modern photo and video equipment, including DSLRs, video, mirrorless, action, digital rangefinder and digital medium format cameras. Plus, they will also purchase accessories such as tripods lenses and flashgun from you.

 

To get a quote, simply fill in the form over on the MPB website and get a free, instant online quote on your kit.


Start Shopping

ePHOTOzine Plus Membership - Only £15 For The Year

ePHOTOzine Plus Membership – Only £15 For The Year 

Plus membership is ePHOTOzine’s paid for membership, giving you a host of great perks in return for supporting the site. Plus membership includes, amongst other things:

  • The ability to give out more awards on site
  • Ad-free portfolio
  • Download your original images
  • Only £15 for the year

Get yours today!

Buy ‘Plus’ Membership

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 October 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 October 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Robin

© adrianedwa

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to adrianedwa (Day 10 – British Wildlife who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 8

Creative Indoor Shot

Flower Petals

 

Day 9

Landmarks

Angel of the north

 

Day 11

Movement

 

Day 12

Mood

Crazy Man Crazy !!!

 

Day 13

Self Portraits

Disintergration

 

Day 14

Coast Out Of Season

 

Day 15

Fungi

A Yellow One

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

 

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Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 24

Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


The Singular Work of a California Photographer, Unearthed – The New Yorker

Joan Archibald, a Long Island, New York wife and mother of two, was tired of her life as a suburban homemaker in the early 60s. So, she moved to California and, in the era of increasing curiosity of Eastern culture, she changed her name to Kali, the Hindu goddess of death and time.

By the mid-to-late sixties, she began to perfect her photography and even took classes at a junior college. Kali worked by herself and did not share her work publicly. The considerable photography oeuvre that she produced was only rediscovered by her daughter, Susan, in 2016, three years before she died, at the age of eighty-seven.

Flooded with swirling, multilayered psychedelic hues, Kali’s portraits, often of wide-eyed young women, can feel like the ultimate distillation of an expansive, naïve and chaotic place and time. — Len Prince, T: The New York Times Style Magazine


More on Consent — Conscientious

“A little while ago, there was a discussion on Twitter that centered on a photograph someone had taken of a young woman on the New York subway,” writes Jörg M. Colberg. “The woman, a mother of two young children, was wearing a short dress, and she was clearly struggling to deal with her two very active children.”


The Pioneering Scots Photographer Who Captured China — BBC

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 25
Two Manchu soldiers with John Thomson, Amoy, Fukien province, China. Photograph by John Thomson, 1871. This file comes from Wellcome Images, a website operated by Wellcome Trust, CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Pioneering Scottish photographer John Thomson (b.1837) took some of the earliest pictures of China and the now world-famous Angkor Wat religious monument in Cambodia.

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 26
A Pekingese chiropodist. John Thomson. China, c. 1869. The picture is housed in the Wellcome Collection and is on display. The original B&W picture is © Wellcome Trust. Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin FRCP(Glasgow). CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

He traveled to the Far East in 1862 and captured photographs for a decade which form one of the most extensive records of any region taken in the 19th century.


What’s Happening in the Fine Art Photography Market – ArtNet

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but what is one worth in dollars?

Although the market for fine art photography has never reached the soaring heights of other contemporary genres, it remains an exciting niche with a consistent crew of all-star artists at the top.


The Magical Bond Between People and Animals – in Pictures – The Guardian

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 27
Jaden on a trampoline with Chrissy, Animal Tracks, Agua Dulce, CA, 2019 © Sage Sohier

Awesome alpacas, frolicking flamingos, and recuperating ravens … these rescue animals – in Sage Sohier’s photographs – have a zest for life and a remarkable willingness to forgive people.

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 28
Janice with alpacas, Attleboro, MA, 2016 © Sage Sohier
Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 29
Nancy on the beach with rescued cockatoos and “Baby Blue,” Key West, FL, 2014 © Sage Sohier

Peaceable Kingdom The Special Bond between Animals and their Humans is available from Kehrer Verlag.


How Good Is the Canon R3? A Review From a Pro – DigitalPhotoPro

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 30
© Jeff Cable

In an interview with Dan Havlik Jeff Cable, gives us the full scoop on the Canon EOS R3, including his early review of its autofocus system, resolving power, and the things he liked and didn’t like about the camera. Along with discussing shooting sports with the R3 at the Olympics, Cable addresses how the camera might (or might not) be suitable for wildlife and event photography.

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 31
© Jeff Cable

Quotes from the interview:
While I brought two Canon R5s with me to the Olympics as well, I ended up using the R3 98% of the time. I shot with it for almost everything, and even though it was a pre-production model, I had no issues with it.

On the other hand, on a photography trip to Africa after the Olympics, I shot everything on a Canon R5, and it was great to capture wildlife with 45MP and crop where necessary. I shot photos of African fish eagles and did a lot of cropping on them… I also didn’t really need the R3’s 30fps in Africa.

I appreciated that the R3 has a CFexpress card slot. CFexpress cards are just faster. Faster to download, faster for everything compared to SD. I actually wish the R3 had two CFexpress card slots rather than one CFexpress and one SD.

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 32
© Jeff Cable

Greek Photographer, Not a Nurse, Took the Pigeon Photo During a Chance Encounter in HospitalAFP Fact Check

Untitled

Facebook posts published here and here in October 2021 include the image of an elderly patient sleeping in a hospital bed with a pigeon perched on top of him.

“It’s been 3 days since this patient arrived in hospital for treatment,” the captions read. “And in those 3 days, no one in his family came to ask about his well-being (maybe also living alone). But a pigeon comes every day and sits in his bed.”

The posts allege that the man used to feed pigeons daily in a park.


World’s Most Dangerous Photography Jobs – ShotKit

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 33
Depositphotos
  • Storm Chasers
  • Conflict photojournalism
  • Surf Photography
  • Deep-Sea & Shark Photography
  • Conservation Photography
  • Sports & Adventure Photography

Get the details and tips at the link above.


How To Preserve the Rubber Parts of Cameras & Lenses – Beyond Photo Tips

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 34
Depositphotos

When you’ve had a camera for a while, wear-and-tear comes into play. One of the many things that happen when cameras are stored away for a long time is that the rubber starts to degrade.

While there aren’t many ways to recover rubber that is starting to degrade, there are ways to keep the rubber from spoiling too quickly in the first place.

“If the rubber is only just starting to become sticky, you can give it a light dusting of talcum powder to reduce the tackiness,” advises Susheel Chandradhas. “Prevention is better than cure, so ensure that you don’t let hand lotions, DEET, or sunscreen get on the rubber parts of the camera.”


This Bride Didn’t Have a Gown or Photographer on her Wedding Day. A Hospice Caregiver Helped her Redo it, 77 Years Later – CBS News

Frankie King did not have an extravagant wedding day. It was 1944 — at the height of World War II — when her high school sweetheart, Royce, became her fiancé. But like many young men at the time, Royce joined the military and was moved to a base in another state. Royce returned to Oelwein, Iowa, to marry his bride.

“It’s a small town,” Sue Bilodeau, their daughter, told CBS. “They only had a couple of days’ notice.”

So, no time to buy a wedding gown and no photographer either. But all that changed at age 97, thanks to a caring nurse!


Nikon FM3A: Nikon’s Last Manual-Focus SLR at 20 – Amateur Photographer

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 35
Nikon’s last manual-focus film SLR, Valwit, CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

From Amateur Photographer
The traditional form-factor of the 35mm single lens reflex (SLR) evolved in the 1950s and was subsequently refined over the next half-century…In the semi-professional range, it seemed likely that the FM2n would be the end of the line for the all-metal, all-manual FM series of SLRs when it appeared in 1983.

It was a surprise to many when Nikon launched the FM3A in the summer of 2001, two years after the D1 digital SLR. With manual focus, all-metal construction, no built-in winder, and a marked absence of liquid crystal displays, it seemed to encompass everything that the SLR manufacturers were trying to leave behind at the time. It looked retro, even old-fashioned, and not a few photographers at the time scratched their heads and wondered who and what the enigmatic FM3A was for.


Ansel Adams, Brassaï and Bill Brandt Sitting on a Bench: Paul Joyce’s Best Photograph – The Guardian

Ansel [Adams] asked me if I used his zone system. It’s a way of regulating exposure based on the conditions and the film you’re using. Ansel had written five volumes on this, and you had to be a scientist trained at Oxford to actually understand it. So, slightly embarrassed, I told him: “Well, I kind of have my own system.” “Oh,” he said. “You probably use mine unconsciously anyway.” — Photographer Paul Joyce in The Guardian


The Godfather of Rock ‘n’ Roll Photography Isn’t Ready to Talk About His Legacy – InsideHook

Mick Rock still has the rock ‘n’ roll look, even though he’s now well into his seventies. But that’s entirely appropriate. The British-born, New York-based photographer, helped define the city’s music scene in its one true golden age, shooting iconic images of Iggy Pop, Bryan Ferry, Syd Barret and Lou Reed — for whom he shot the album cover of Transformer. He shot the same for Queen II and David Bowie’s Pin-ups.

It’s funny how photography then just wasn’t considered an art form. But it is now. — Mick Rock to InsideHook.


Photo of the Week

Embed from Getty Images


Quiz of the Week

1.) Who took the world’s first selfie and when?

2.) Is it possible to make a zoom lens for any format with a fixed f/1.2 aperture in the near future?

3.) The AP Leafax 35 was a portable device used by photojournalists that transmitted photos over analog phone lines starting in 1988. How long did it take to transmit a single color photo?

Answers

1.) American photographer Robert Cornelius took a self-portrait (the word selfie did not exist then) in 1839 (Oct. or Nov.) And this was without a cable release! He simply ran in front of the camera after taking the cover off the lens and, in the hurry, couldn’t possibly accurately position himself in the center.

2.) We do not know, but this week a Nikon patent for two Z-mount camera lenses, a 35-50mm f/1.2 and a 50-70mm f/1.2, has been issued (filed in Jan 2019).

3.) Around 30 mins.


Why I Like This Photo – Rachel Owen

Great Reads in Photography: October 17, 2021 36
Liturgy 2020 © Rachel Owen

At the height of the covid pandemic, my son entered his first year of high school. I felt his age group was significantly underrepresented in the COVID-19 conversation, and I wanted to create an image portraying what he and his friends were going through.

I told my son I needed him for a photo, and he being a teenage boy growing up with two photographers for parents, looked at me and said flatly, “You’ve got ten minutes, Mom.”

Knowing the portrait categories at WPPI only allow single capture images, I planned to create a triple exposure with my Canon 5D Mark IV. Also, knowing my son would make good on his ten-minute cooperation limit, I spent a couple of hours in preparation with video tutorials on best multiple exposure practices and setting the lighting with my husband as a test subject.

We started with a 50mm lens and switched to 100mm for more compression allowing his shoulders to overlap. I knew the virtual reality goggles would stick out, so I wanted a small aperture (we used f/10) to keep everything in focus from front to back. We used butterfly lighting because I wanted the ominous look of shadows cutting in the cheekbones; then, it was just a matter of getting the right amount of kicker to separate him from the background but not distract.

Ultimately the shoot took 22 minutes. My husband and son had a great time laughing at me as I frantically tried to get every detail right within my time limit. The goggles and headphones kept messing up his hair, and I wouldn’t let him move a muscle until all three exposures had been taken.

I titled this image Liturgy 2020 and wrote a poem with the same name, which pretty much sums up everything I intended to say. My hope for my son and this generation is that he would learn to pay attention to what is around him, genuinely listen to the opinions of others, and have sound arguments for what he believes with the courage to speak it out.

Liturgy 2020
He will not see for his vision is regulated⁠⠀
Let us not see evil⁠⠀
He will not hear for his ears ring with a technological hum⁠⠀
Let us not hear evil⁠⠀
He will not speak for institution has vanquished his voice⁠⠀
Let us not speak of evil⁠⠀
We mirror his stare and turn a blind eye⁠

Rachel Owen, and her husband Jeff, are a wedding photography team based in Chicago that have dipped their toes into nearly every genre of photography. With over 3,000 weddings and 3,000 portraits sessions of personal experience, Jeff and Rachel’s greatest joy is using their cameras to preserve the love in a relationship or a family bond, knowing those moments will live on in print forever.


Quote of the Week – Zanele Muholi

Zanele Muholi, “Bester V”, Mayotte, 2015 © Zanele Muholi, Courtesy of the artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg/Amsterdam and Yancey Richardson, New York.
Zanele Muholi, “Bester V,” Mayotte, 2015 © Zanele Muholi, Courtesy of the artist and Stevenson, Cape Town, Johannesburg, Amsterdam, Yancey Richardson, New York, and Gropius Bau.

Fine artists deal with finery, but I deal with painful material. — Zanele Muholi

Gropius Bau opens the first major survey in Germany of South African visual activist Zanele Muholi from 26 Nov 2021–13 Mar 2022.

Zanele Muholi  FRPS (b. 1972) is a South African artist and visual activist working in photography, video, and installation. Muholi’s work focuses on race, gender, and sexuality with a body of work that dates back to the early 2000s, documenting and celebrating the lives of South Africa’s Black lesbian, gay, transgender, and intersex communities. In 2012, Muholi began the acclaimed series of dramatic self-portraits entitled Somnyama Ngonyama (“Hail the Dark Lioness” in isiZulu), where the artist adopts different poses, characters, and archetypes to address issues of race and representation.


To see an archive of past issues of Great Reads in Photography, click here.


We welcome comments as well as suggestions. As we cannot possibly cover each and every source, if you see something interesting in your reading or local newspaper anywhere in the world, kindly forward the link to us here. ALL messages will be personally acknowledged.


About the author: Phil Mistry is a photographer and teacher based in Atlanta, GA. He started one of the first digital camera classes in New York City at The International Center of Photography in the 90s. He was the director and teacher for Sony/Popular Photography magazine’s Digital Days Workshops. You can reach him via email here.


Image credits: All photographs as credited and used with permission from the photographers or agencies. Portions of header photo via Depositphotos.

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Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021 37

Every day, the PetaPixel Instagram account is sharing excellent photography from our readers and those who inspire us. Here’s a look at some of our recent favorite posts and the photographers behind the lens.

Our @PetaPixel Instagram page has been posting all the great work that finds its way in front of our eyes. Want to see your photos shared on our account? First, you’ll want to follow us. Then use the #petapixel hashtag in your posts to join our Instagram community of photographers. These steps let us easily find what to share.

Below, we recognize a selection of talented photographers who recently had their work featured on @PetaPixel. Keep posting your images with #petapixel and you could find yourself here next week.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021 38

Peter Jovic is based out of Margaret River in Western Australia and can be found on Instagram as @peterjovicphotography. Jovic told PetaPixel that his specialty is shooting surfing and the ocean in general, with an emphasis on movement and motion. “This image was captured at one of the local surf breaks that sometimes lends itself to this style of photography,” he said.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021 39

Mike Knight, known as @mikeyknighty on Instagram, calls himself an outdoors hobbyist photographer and is based out of Somerset in South West England. “I love to travel the world with my camera and capture moments that showcase what this incredible planet has to offer,” he said. Talking about this specific photo taken in the Final forest of Madeira, Knight commented that “the charismatic Laurisilva trees coupled with fog and morning light helped to create this surreal fantasy-like scene.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021 40

Noel Casaje, or @noelcasajephotography on Instagram, is an award-winning photographer and guide that shot this photo titled “Rhapsody in Purple” during a trip to the Oregon coastline. “The challenge was finding wildflowers with a background that would complement them,” Casaje told PetaPixel. “It took quite a bit of hiking, scrambling, climbing bluffs, a few scratches here and there, but I did succeed in finding some comps.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021 41

George Lin, found on Instagram as @geolio, is an educator and designer. Lin said that he enjoys spending his time “exploring and photographing the world (and sometimes other worlds) to better understand them.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: October 15, 2021 42

Jonas Hafner, known as @aufzehengehen.de on Instagram, is a full-time medical doctor and photography enthusiast. “In the beginning, I was mostly taking landscape pictures but nowadays I would rather call myself a portrait photographer as I really enjoying working with people and being creative,” Hafner told PetaPixel. His favorite images are ones that “stand the test of time and focus on a person’s natural beauty.”


Be sure to follow us on Instagram to see more work from photographers like you and tag photos with #petapixel for them to be considered for a feature.


Image credits: All photographs used with the permission of their respective photographers.

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 October 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 October 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Autumn Leaves

© BarbaraR

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to BarbaraR (Day 2 – Autumn Abstracts) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 1

Autumn Landscapes

 

Day 2

Autumn Abstracts

 

Day 3

Spider’s Web

 

Day 4

Gardens In Autumn

 

Day 5

Rainy Days

 

Day 6

Orange Colour

 

Day 7

Autumn Reflections

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

 

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A picture, a moment can change the way we feel. Change how we see ourselves. Change our understanding and change the rules. Provoke and change history.


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MPB puts photo and video kit into more hands, more sustainably. Every month, visual storytellers sell more than 20,000 cameras and lenses to MPB. Choose used and get affordable access to kit that doesn’t cost the earth.

Sell the kit you’re not using to MPB. Trade in for the kit you need to create. Buy used, spend less and get more.

Buy. Sell. Trade. Create.


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Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 43

Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


Photo Dumps Are Now in Museums – Elle

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 44
Isaac West, Untitled, from IN LOVE, 2021. © Isaac West

A new photo exhibit called INWARD: Reflections on Interiority at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York City features work shot entirely on an iPhone. Open through next January, it gives the spotlight to five emerging Black artists.

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 45
Brad Ogbonna, Paul & Peter, 2021. © Brad Ogbonna

Curator Isolde Brielmaier notes that Apple is redefining its work, specifically regarding the iPhone 12 Pro Max and its camera capabilities.

“The richness of darker skin tones comes through in a much more dynamic way,” Breilmaier explains to Elle.

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 46
Isaac West, Untitled, from IN LOVE, 2021. © Isaac West
Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 47
Arielle Bobb-Willis, New Jersey 01, 2021. © Arielle Bobb-Willis

Breilmaier is likewise awestruck that a tech tool can also produce personal images. “I think my favorite part of curating this exhibit is to see how compelling the viewpoints of these artists are. They’re using the same phone that I use, that you use, but what they see is completely unique,” she says. “So, through their Photo folder, we can see their world. Which informs how we see our world.”


How an F-15 Pilot’s Life Was Saved by a Photographer – Air & Space

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 48
Stock photo of US Air Force F-15 Eagle, Depositphotos

Last July 13, Ian Simpson was in a favorite spot just outside the fence at RAF Lakenheath, north of London, England, home to the US Air Force 48th Fighter Wing taking photos of planes taking off.

As US Air Force pilot Major Grant Thompson took off in his F-15E, Simpson noticed a shower of sparks coming from the aircraft’s rear. As the fighter continued to climb, Simpson Googled the base, called the switchboard, and reached flight operations. “I said, ‘Look, something is wrong with the plane, definitely. We’ve got lots of photographs of sparks coming out the back’,” Simpson, 56, told the Associated Press.

Also, on CNN


The First Picture Taken on a Leica – Kosmo Foto

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 49
The first image of a crowd of shoppers was taken from the Ur-Leica by Oskar Barnack, 1914. The old town of Wetzlar, Germany, view down Silhöfer Straße (street) with the Eisenmarkt (iron market) to the left. Barnack died 1936, in Bad Nauheim, Germany. Public Domain from Wikimedia.

Stephen Dowling, founder & editor of Kosmo Foto, writes:
At the turn of the century, many cameras – Kodak’s lightweight Brownie excepted – were bulky, heavy and difficult to carry. Oskar Barnack, a skilled mechanic who worked in the microscope department of Ernst Leitz in Wetzlar, was an enthusiastic amateur photographer who often took cameras with him on his travels.

It’s believed that Barnack began thinking about a camera small enough to take anywhere as early as 1905. At Ernst Leitz, he was involved in the production of the company’s first cine camera. Cinema films used a much smaller film format than stills cameras of the time, making them much lighter and easier to carry. Cine film’s size – 18 x 24mm compared to large plates used in many still cameras – was Barnack’s springboard for developing the world’s first 35mm camera.

… Between 1913 and 1914, Barnack perfected the design of a camera that, a decade later, would enter the market as the first Leica camera. Instead of the film being transported vertically, as it was in a cinema camera, Barnack’s prototype camera transported the film horizontally…He called this camera the Ur-Leica.

Via DPreview

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 50
Wetzlar’s historic center survived aerial bombing in World War II relatively unscathed, and the street looks almost like Barnack viewed it in 1914. A commemorative plaque marks the spot in Wetzlar where Oskar Barnack tested his Ur-Leica in this modern view (2018). Aljawad, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

A True Story About Bogus Photos of People Making Fake News — WIRED

From WIRED:
The photographic elite gathered in Perpignan, France, on September 1 at the annual Visa Pour L’Image photojournalism festival. That night, the outdoor screen shimmered with images of people using laptops in Soviet-era apartments and a bear strolling past rundown industrial sites. They came from The Book of Veles by Jonas Bendiksen, an award-winning documentary photographer. He had traveled to North Macedonia, which had been home to a vibrant fake news industry during the 2016 US election. As his peers gazed at his work, Bendiksen watched from the bleachers with increasing discomfort…

In fact, Bendiksen had created the people in the images with software. The next day, the prestigious cooperative Magnum Photo posted an interview in which Bendiksen revealed that although he had traveled to Veles, every person and bear in his images were digitally faked using 3D models like those used to make video games…

“It’s scary that the most visually sophisticated people on the planet fell for this,” Bendiksen told WIRED. “Where’s the threshold for fooling people who are not so visually literate?”


San Francisco Photography Legend Robert Altman Dead at 77 SFgate

Embed from Getty Images

Robert Altman, the legendary San Francisco photojournalist who focused his lens on the city’s counterculture in the 1960s and 1970s, died on Sept. 24.

Altman, who was born in NYC, trained under Ansel Adams before moving to San Francisco in 1968, where he quickly became a fixture in the city’s counterculture scene, befriending — and sometimes photographing — artists, musicians and hippies with ease. He was Rolling Stone’s chief staff photographer.


The ‘Gift of Pictures’: Praemium Imperiale Laureate Sebastião Salgado on his PhotographyJapanForward

This year’s laureate in painting is artist and photographer Sebastião Salgado (Brazil/France), recognized by the Japan Arts Association for his powerful works that “put a spotlight on the dispossessed and exploited, the beauty of nature, and the fragility of the world and its inhabitants.”

To make a photo, you need to have an authorization ‒ not a written authorization, nothing signed, but a tacit authorization. It should not be you taking photos; it should be the person in front of you who gives you the photo as a gift. – Sebastiao Salgado to JapanForward


Lion Roaring as Fly Buzzes into his Eye Wins Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year 2021—The Sun

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 51
Fly in the eye. Chobe National Park, Botswana. © Hannes Lochner

An amazing photograph of a lion roaring as a fly buzzes in his eye has won the Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year 2021.

The stunning entry was selected from 25,023 photographs that celebrated the African continent.

“With one snap of the shutter, this image succeeds with so many of the criteria that make an excellent photograph,” commented the judges. “It is technically brilliant from the perspective of timing, anticipation, and setting the camera perfectly for the predicted behavior. Then, as with so many great wildlife shots, luck played a huge part as the fly just happened into the frame at the right time.”

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 52
‘The Murderous Pharaoh’ – a member of the famous cheetah coalition of five, Tano Bora, in the middle of a zebra meal. Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. © Aditya Nair
In the Olare Motorogi Conservancy of Kenya a mother giraffe tries to protect her young baby from a pride of female and young lions trying to attack it. Salivating out of stress, the first female lion jumps on the mother giraffe to separate her from her baby.
Attack – a pride sets upon a giraffe cow and her helpless calf. Olare Motorogi Conservancy, Kenya. © James Nampaso

Discover Daguerreotype Photography and How the Pioneering Process Is Still Used Today — MyModernMet

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 53
A daguerreotype of  Shimazu Nariakira, the daimyō of Satsuma in formal attire taken by Ichiki Shirō (1828 – 1903) on 17 September 1857, is the earliest surviving Japanese photograph. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons from Anne Tucker et al., The History of Japanese Photography. Yale University Press, 2003.

My Modern Met writes:

American artist Chuck Close worked with Jerry Spagnoli to take a series of daguerreotype images of fellow artists, poets, film stars, and other creatives. Close converted the old metal plates into super-sharp, large digital prints by scanning the daguerreotype in high resolution. Merging old and new techniques, the experimental artist found a rather dangerous way to capture the famous faces in beautiful detail. “A normal daguerreotype is a more than two-minute exposure,” he says. “We’ve made it instant photography by having a billion foot-candles of light go off all at once, and that’s very painful. The flashes are so intense your eyes slam shut. It’s like having an ice pick shoved in your eyeball.”


Where and How to Photograph the Aurora — Space

Curious mule deer Odocoileus hemionus staring in camera while photographing spectacular display of green Northern Lights Aurora borealis over moon-lit boreal forest taiga
Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and aurora borealis over taiga forest, Depositphotos

Here is a guide to capturing the elusive Northern Lights or aurora borealis which is certainly there on every adventure and outdoor photographers’ bucket list.

On an active night, the aurora can be thousands of miles long, so you can capture it in Iceland, Norway, Finnish Lapland, Alberta (Canada), or Alaska. You can also capture it in New Zealand, where you can get the Southern Lights or the aurora australis.


‘I Want my photographs to Convey the Reality’ – Lynsey Addario – PhotojournalismNews

I am trying to capture the reality of a given scene or situation and trying to say whatever the subject is trying to say. My images are just a vehicle for the subject or story.– Lynsey Addario to Photojournalism News.

Read also:
A Chat with War Photographer Lynsey Addario
War Photographer Lynsey Addario Shares the Photos That Impacted Her the Most


Helen Levitt: the Most Celebrated, Least Known Photographer of her Time – The Guardian

From The Guardian:
The American poet and cultural critic David Levi Strauss memorably described Helen Levitt as “maybe the most celebrated and least known photographer of her time.” That was in 1997 when Levitt was 84 and the subject of a retrospective at The International Center of Photography in New York, the city in which she was born and made most of her work. Just over two decades on and 12 years after her death, aged 95, in 2009, one could argue that little has changed in terms of her enigmatic status.


Local Wedding Photographer Sues NYS Over Right to Deny Service for Same-Sex Marriage Ceremonies – WENYnews

WENY News

A local photographer is suing New York State over the state’s anti-discrimination laws, specifically, the photographer’s right to choose to accept or deny requests to photograph same-sex marriage ceremonies.


Five Photographers Share Why They Use Creative Commons Licenses – Flickr

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 54
Prairie. Seen at the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve. JoLynne Martinez CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Creative Commons is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, and they have since the beginning been offering an alternative to full copyright under Creative Commons licenses.

These licenses give everyone from individual creators to large institutions a standardized way to grant the public permission to use their creative work under copyright law.

Photographers, artists, and other creators on Flickr have contributed hundreds of millions of photos, enabling others to use their work in Wikipedia articles, news items, and more.


Does this Photo Show a Meteor Falling into a Volcano? — Snopes

“This is a genuine photograph of a meteor streaking above a volcano. While the angle of this photograph makes it appear as if the meteor was falling ‘into’ the volcano, that likely isn’t the case,” explains Snopes.

The claim is miscaptioned as the stated destination of this meteor was likely off by a few miles.

Indonesian photographer Gunarto Song’s photo above was a four-second exposure as the meteor descended above the volcano. The meteor was a round light, but the long exposure created a streaking effect.


Harlem Street Named After White Photographer Art Kane of Famed Picture Gets Community Pushback — Yahoo

A 1958 photo of legendary jazz musicians, called A Great Day in Harlem, was shot by photographer Art Kane on August 12, 1958, while he was on assignment for Esquire and quickly became famous.

Last month, the city renamed this iconic block between Madison and Fifth Avenues, calling it Art Kane Harlem 1958.

Now residents are objecting to a street being named after the man who took the iconic pic.


Great Read from the Past — 2017

Monkey Selfie Photographer David Slater Says He’s Broke: ‘I’m Thinking of Dog Walking’ – The Guardian

Read Also Photographer Wins Monkey Selfie Copyright Case, Court Slams PETA


Photos of the Week

The Story of Two Men on Different Sides Whose Paths Unwittingly Crossed 80 years Ago

Embed from Getty Images
Defendant Josef S. gets help from his lawyer Stefan Waterkamp (L) to hide his face behind a folder as he arrives for his trial in Brandenburg an der Havel, northeastern Germany, on October 7, 2021. – The 100-year-old former concentration camp guard will become the oldest person yet to be tried for Nazi-era crimes in Germany when he goes before the court charged with complicity in mass murder. The suspect, identified as Josef S., stands accused of “knowingly and willingly” assisting in the murder of 3,518 prisoners at the Sachsenhausen camp in Oranienburg, north of Berlin, between 1942 and 1945.
Embed from Getty Images
Holocaust survivor Leon Schwarzbaum shows a family picture as he arrives to observe a trial against defendant Josef S.


Quiz of the Week
1.) Canon EOS R3 and Sony a9 II use what’s called Stacked CMOS technology for their 24 megapixel sensors. This means:
a.) Certain pixels are stacked one on top of the other for better light gathering
b.) There are high-speed ram chips wired directly to the rear of the sensor
c.) Multiple colored filters are stacked on top of each pixel

2.) Who opened the first photographic studio in the US?

3.) The new iPhone 13 Pro offers Macro. Is there a third-party software solution to shooting in macro mode for owners of older iPhones?

Answers
1.) b. These ram chips allow for high-speed readout rates.

2.) Samuel Morse, the inventor of the telegraph. Daguerre gave Morse a copy of his photographic instructions in the summer of 1839 before Morse returned to America after a visit to France. Morse hadn’t sold his telegraph yet, so he supported himself by opening the first photography studio in the United States and teaching others photography.

3.) Yes, all iPhones (from the iPhone 8 and on) can shoot macro with the Halide app — no accessories required.


Why I Like This PhotoPatrick Smith

Embed from Getty Images

I like this photo because it is one of a kind from Super Bowl LV. No other photographer has the same image, a rare feat for a major sporting event where photographers were stacked next to one another.

What elevates the image even more is that it’s of what many consider one of the greatest of our lifetime, Tom Brady. Not only did he win another Super Bowl, but after being with the Patriots his entire career, he proved that being traded and his age wouldn’t stand in his way of winning another ring.

For this image of Tom Brady, having an angle with a clean background was first and foremost important. Second, it was hoping to get a reflection of his face. There is so much happening on the field of play during any sporting event, but especially at the Super Bowl and celebration following the game. Family, friends, players can get in the way of zeroing in on the moment.

This was shot on a Canon 1DX Mark III on a Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x at 560mm (with the converter down) at 1/1600, 5.6 at 6400 ISO.

This was shot as Tom Brady of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers celebrated with the Lombardi Trophy after defeating the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl LV at Raymond James Stadium on February 07, 2021, in Tampa, Florida.

Due to the pandemic, photographers did not have field access like we normally would at prior Super Bowls. This was something we had become accustomed to when sporting events began to make their return a few months prior. This, however, made working the entire game difficult navigating only the first row of seating, finding creative ways to tell a story from this one position.

By the time the game had ended, it felt like a weight was lifted. As the celebration started, I saw the reflection in the trophy and tried to work it a few times. Sometimes you just know if you were able to get the shot, and that was the case here. It was after Brady passed on the trophy, I was able to confirm on the back of the camera that I did and then transmit it to our remote editing team at Getty so they could get it out for the world to see on our site in under a minute.

We usually cover the Super Bowl with a massive team of photographers and editors on-site, but this game had to be covered with only three photographers and a couple of technical and editorial support. Therefore, strategy in our movements became much more of a thought process and very deliberate to make sure we covered every aspect of the game, celebrations, fans, etc. At the end of the day, it was a huge success for our Getty team, and this is just one image that shows that.

Patrick Smith is a staff photographer with Getty Images based in Baltimore, MD, documenting news, sports, and feature stories locally and internationally. Smith has been recognized notably by The Pulitzer Prizes, Pictures of the Year International, The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, Pro Football Hall of Fame, Society of Professional Journalists, National Motorsports Press Association, and The National Press Photographers Association.


Quote of the Week – Mitch Epstein

Great Reads in Photography: October 10, 2021 55
Chilton Ranch, Arivaca, Arizona 2017 © Mitch Epstein. Photo from Property Rights published by Steidl

Documentary work is commonly associated with objectivity. I am not objective.* – Mitch Epstein

*My photographs have been drawn from the real world since my beginnings in the late ՚60s although I’ve never thought of myself as a documentarian. Documentary work is commonly associated with objectivity. I am not objective. My photographs function like poetry, a distillation of my real-life experience compressed into the flattened frame of a still photograph. DocumentJournal.com

Mitch Epstein (b. 1952) is a photographer who helped pioneer fine-art color photography in the 1970s. Epstein’s fifteen books include Property Rights (Steidl, fall 2021), In India (Steidl, fall 2021),  Sunshine Hotel (Steidl/PPP Editions, fall 2019); Rocks and Clouds (Steidl 2017); New York Arbor (Steidl 2013); Berlin (Steidl/The American Academy in Berlin 2011); American Power (Steidl 2009); Mitch Epstein: Work (Steidl 2006); Recreation: American Photographs 1973-1988 (Steidl 2005); and Family Business (Steidl 2003), winner of the 2004 Kraszna-Krausz Photography Book Award.


To see an archive of past issues of Great Reads in Photography, click here.


We welcome comments as well as suggestions. As we cannot possibly cover each and every source, if you see something interesting in your reading or local newspaper anywhere in the world, kindly forward the link to us here. ALL messages will be personally acknowledged.


About the author: Phil Mistry is a photographer and teacher based in Atlanta, GA. He started one of the first digital camera classes in New York City at The International Center of Photography in the 90s. He was the director and teacher for Sony/Popular Photography magazine’s Digital Days Workshops. You can reach him via email here.


Image credits: All photographs as credited and used with permission from the photographers or agencies. Portions of header photo via Depositphotos.

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