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Photographing ‘The Gap’ in Torndirrup National Park

Photographing 'The Gap' in Torndirrup National Park

Photographing 'The Gap' in Torndirrup National Park 1

The year was 2014. I was seven years younger and because of that, it was a very good year. Do you remember the time when it didn’t hurt to get out of bed? When camera bags didn’t feel like bags of wet cement, and when your eyesight was so good you could spot a discounted Cabernet Sauvignon from one hundred paces? Ah those were the days. I shall remember them fondly.

So how did I get this shot? I am glad you asked. It wasn’t without some serious risk-taking on my part. As you may know from previous lies, I mean stories, I take landscape photography very seriously – so much so my wife has recently purchased Frankincense and Rosehip oil to help straighten out my frown lines. Remember when you didn’t have frown lines?

So really, how was this photograph taken?

First, let me set the scene. It was in Torndirrup National Park at a spot called the Gap not far from the southern town of Albany in Western Australia. The coastline here is battered relentlessly by the Southern Ocean. If you go south from this spot the next landmass you hit is Antarctica. When the swell arrives, it is huge and angry. To say death is a likely outcome when photographing here might be an exaggeration, but it does help set the mood and make things rather more dramatic. What you don’t see behind the camera is the sheer drop into the cold dark water. If you take that drop, you won’t be developing the negs, if you know what I mean!

Rocks, sand, and the seashore against a bright red sunrise

The coastline, because of all this extreme weather, is rugged and photogenic. This group of rocks are larger than they look. In fact, if you fell off these you would probably die horribly. Luckily, I was born with common sense, or is it just common? Anyway, I didn’t think the view from the top was as nice as the view from the bottom. I was then interested in trying to balance the composition and offer interest in the foreground that would lead your eye to the rocks behind. I used a vertical crop to allow more of the foreground to tell the story. This also allowed me to balance the three rocks with the central one as the main point of interest.

The image was shot on my Phase One IQ280 with the 28mm Phase One lens. The shutter was 2.5 seconds with an aperture of f/12 and ISO 35. The camera was secured to a tripod as the light was low; it was before sunrise. Now you say, “Those clouds look to be moving way more than the 2.5-second exposure would imply.” You would be right in that and please let me offer up a defense.

The clouds weren’t moving fast enough and as a result, the sky looked a little, as an Aussie would say, “poxie.” Roughly translated it means pretty average! So being the purist I am and by asking the viewers to “look away, nothing to see here,” I possibly, maybe, definitely added a bit of motion blur to the sky in Photoshop. I know, I know, I can see you now shaking your fists at the screen screaming, “WHY, WHY?” I guess I just got lazy and must have left the ND filter back in the Lamborghini. Still, it is only a little thing, and the real heroes are the rocks. I have also focus-stacked this image from five individual frames, all focused on different points and combined using PT GUI.

In Capture One I messed around (i.e., carefully selected) the white balance to set the color I wanted. I also wanted to lighten and bring out the detail in the rock. By having blues and oranges, two complementary colors, it added to the visual harmony and overall pleasing aesthetic. Photoshop was used to continue to refine the image and I used simple dodging and burning techniques to lighten the light areas and darken the shadows. This allowed me to make the rocks look more dimensional and increase depth and three-dimensionality.

A brightly colored rock surrounded by a flock of birds against a stormy sky

I hope you have enjoyed my completely honest and unbiased technical report on how this image came together. What I haven’t mentioned was how I love what I do and how much fun I have doing it. Life is too short, so get out and enjoy the pure pleasure of making photographs. There are no rules, just pixels — do with them what you want!


The article is courtesy of ELEMENTS Magazine. ELEMENTS is the monthly magazine dedicated to the finest landscape photography, insightful editorials and fluid, clean design. Inside you will find exclusive and in-depth articles and imagery by the best landscape photographers in the world such as Bruce Barnbaum, Edward Burtynsky, Michael Kenna, Erin Babnik, Chuck Kimmerle, Rachael Talibart, Charles Cramer, Hans Strand and Lynn Radeka, to name a few. Use the PETAPIXEL10 code for a 10% discount off the annual subscription.


About the author: Christian Fletcher has been a professional photographer for over 27 years, and remains dedicated to using photography as a way to reinforce our connection to our natural environment. Christian runs an award-winning gallery in Dunsborough, Western Australia, and teaches workshops both at home in Australia and internationally.

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Photographer’s Eerie Nighttime Series Features an Abandoned Water Park

Photographer's Eerie Nighttime Series Features an Abandoned Water Park

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Photographer Ken Lee enjoys the mystery and excitement of nighttime photography as he explores abandoned sites when most are asleep. His latest series features an abandoned water park that had plenty of photographic opportunities.

Nighttime photography can unleash creative opportunities that daytime shoots don’t always deliver. Lee, an experienced nighttime photographer and explorer of “secret places” across the country, finds this type of photography particularly appealing.

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“If I do a long exposure of several minutes, I am able to walk around the scene and light it with a handheld light, much like a producer might light a movie, choosing what to illuminate and what to keep in shadow,” he says.

He also finds that having creative control over lighting, texture, and color can be “totally addicting” and unique because no two photos ever come out exactly the same. Not just that, the calm of the night makes the process a therapeutic and calming one, giving him time to slow down, take in the surroundings, and appreciate the stars drifting across the sky.

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One of Lee’s latest shoots at an abandoned and post-apocalyptic-looking water park fit the bill — it had plenty of unique features to explore, splashes of color from graffiti sprayed on the buildings, and exuded just enough of darkness and mystery for Lee to really enjoy shooting the area.

The night he chose to photograph featured a full moon and as a result, provided Lee with plenty of light and allowed him to have a longer exposure of several minutes for his shots. He also was able to stop down to f/8 and use a lower ISO to have a broader depth of field, reduce the noise, and provide enough time to light paint exactly how he intended.

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Lee points out that photographers often think they need special equipment to do shots like these.

“On the contrary, although a nice camera is of course always helpful, you may use any sort of camera that allows manual control, which is just about any DSLR or mirrorless camera, new or old,” he tells PetaPixel.

“You can create photos like this with modest equipment, especially since you don’t need a lens with wide apertures, which are typically more expensive.”

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Currently, Lee uses a Pentax K-1 with Pentax 15-30mm f/2.8 lens, both he purchased used. He also has a Nikon D750 on hand, which was also a second-hand purchase, along with a Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 lens.

All of the cameras were mounted on Feisol tripods, while he used a handheld ProtoMachines LED2 light painting device, which produces all colors in the RGB spectrum, allows brightness and saturation control, among other features.

Although photographing in late hours can be a peaceful process, Lee felt a little apprehensive and unsure whether he’d come across any strangers hanging out at the park. That’s why Lee suggests photographers obtain permission whenever possible or go visit sites that require special permission prior to entry and can therefore be considered safer.

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Another option is to organize a shoot with other people, which can give a sense of safety due to the number of people around. Similarly, night photography workshops can give a good shot at night photography, although those tend to focus more on astrophotography, Lee says.

When it comes to the finished images, Lee doesn’t let him sit idle on his computer. He already has two books featuring night photography of abandoned sites, which give personal stories alongside the history of the sites where possible. Images from this nighttime visit at the abandoned park are likely to make an appearance in his upcoming book, but there is yet plenty of work to do from writing to assembling the book.

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He plans on visiting other abandoned sites for more images because part of the excitement is visiting, exploring, and learning about the history of these sites, as well as photographing them at night.

“Between creating night photos, the rich history, the mystery, and the vivid experience while exploring, there can be quite a lot to share in these books!”

More of Lee’s work can be found on his website and Instagram.


Image credits: All images by Ken Lee and used with permission.

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Park Cameras celebrate 50 years with Imaging Festival 2021

park cameras imaging festival promotional banner

Events in person are back at Park Cameras as their Imaging Festival returns in October 2021! Celebrating their 50th year of trading as an independent photo retailer, Park Cameras are laying on a whole range of free photo seminars for you to attend with the aim to inspire and teach customers about new aspects of photography they may not have previously considered.

Over the last decade, the Imaging Festival has been a regular fixture on the photographic calendar that photo enthusiasts from all over the country have looked forward to attending, and the entire team at Park Cameras are delighted that the environment has now allowed for the event to be hosted once again.

park cameras imaging festival promotional banner

In addition to this, by visiting on the day, you can get hands-on with some of the latest gear to have been announced, including the Canon EOS R3, Fujifilm GFX 50S II and the compact Ricoh GR IIIx.

The Imaging Festival will be held on Saturday 2nd October at their Burgess Hill store in West Sussex, and Saturday 9th October at their Central London store, located just off Oxford Street.

Learn from the experts and bag an incredible deal

The Imaging Festival has been carefully curated to suit photographers of all levels – whether you’re a beginner, enthusiast or a use photography to make a living, you will leave the day feeling inspired.

Park Cameras have two of the largest photographic stores in the country with dedicated areas to allow customers to try out the latest products available on the market.

At the Imaging Festival, their own expert staff will be joined by technical experts from over 20+ of the largest photographic brands including Canon, Sony, Fujifilm, Olympus, Panasonic, Hasselblad, Sigma, Tamron, Zeiss, Epson, Vanguard, 3 Legged Thing, H&Y and many more. Visit on the day and they’ll help get your questions answered, no matter how obscure they might be!

Canon EOS R3, Fujifilm GFX 50S II and Ricoh GR IIIx.

Upon visiting the Imaging Festival, it’s also a great opportunity to take a home a bargain as there will be a wide-range of exclusive in store only deals to take advantage of, on both cameras and lenses, but also accessories such as tripods, bags, filters and binoculars.

There will also be a number of talks from professional photographers focussing on various topics including how to give your images impact, how you can try out new genres of photography, and how photography can help with your mental health from top experts such as David Clapp, Glyn Dewis, Chad Gordon Higgins, Ron Timehin, and Paul Sanders.

Places can be booked by visiting www.parkcameras.com/imaging-festival.

With so much going on throughout the day, at their Burgess Hill store, Park Cameras have also teamed up with local charity St. Peter and St. James Hospice to offer refreshments including tea, coffee and some light bites.

There will also be the opportunity to enter their raffle and win some fantastic prizes with all proceeds going towards the hospice, who provide expert and compassionate care to adults in Burgess Hill, and the surrounding towns and villages.

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The team at Park Cameras are really looking forward to seeing photo enthusiasts at the Imaging Festival 2021, but appreciate that things are a little different at the current time. However, they have taken steps to ensure that customers, brand representatives and employees enjoy their time at the store, but also feel safe and comfortable.

They will have hand sanitising stations located around the store and are encouraging the use of face coverings when visiting. You can learn more about the procedures they have put in place by visiting their website.

With all this in mind, a visit to Park Cameras on the 2nd October (Burgess Hill) or 9th October (London) will not only be worth it, you’ll pick up some great tips and tricks to improve your photography and it will save you money on a range of your favourite photographic kit, too!

To keep updated with everything that will be taking place at both Imaging Festivals and to book your free seminar place, simply visit www.parkcameras.com/imaging-festival. This is a date that anyone with an interest of photography, from a beginner to professional surely cannot miss!


About Park Cameras

Established in Burgess Hill, West Sussex in 1971, Park Cameras are one of the UK’s leading independent photographic retailers, serving the needs of all photographers, from enthusiasts to professionals, and have built an enviable reputation for outstanding customer service.

In 2008 Park Cameras opened a new purpose-built showroom at their West Sussex headquarters, offering an incredible range of photographic equipment. With a clear emphasis on touch and try, the showroom is a flagship outlet for many of the leading photographic brands, with customers able to try a massive range of the latest photo products.

Friendly and informative staff are on hand to provide help and assistance, whilst the Fujifilm lab and in-house print centre provides customers with a wide range of developing and printing services.

November 2013 saw another milestone in Park Cameras history as they opened a brand new store in Central London, run with the same ethos as Burgess Hill, with the aim to become London’s best camera store.

In 2021, Park Cameras was transitioned to an Employee Ownership Trust. Being beneficiaries of the trust will ensure our staff drive a new level of enthusiasm and commitment to our customers. We will always strive to make Park Cameras the most inspiring place for everything photographic, for any level of photographer and videographer.

Park Cameras is an authorised Canon Pro Partner, Nikon Professional Dealer, Olympus Premium Dealer and Sony Digital Imaging Professional Retailer and home to over 15,000 products from more than 50 of the world’s leading photographic brands.


Further reading

Park Cameras now employee-owned, reports strong sales despite lockdowns

“Lots of customers wanting conversations”: Park Cameras

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : astley hall park food and drink festival

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

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Astley Hall Park Food and Drink Festival

14 Aug 2021 3:16PM  
Views : 39
Unique : 33

Today’s trip out was to Astley Hall, situated in Chorley, where there is a Food and Drink festival 10am – 4pm today (14th August) and tomorrow (15th August). So there’s time to go and have a look this weekend.Some photo opportunties, in fact lots of photo opportunities areound the park, but plenty of food and drink to think about and some nice pattern pictures.

Here’s a selection of shots of the people and the food and drink!

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : places – roundhay park, leeds

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

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Places – Roundhay Park, Leeds

25 Jul 2021 6:59PM  
Views : 89
Unique : 71

Thank heavens for SatNavs, the one and only way to defeat the Mangled Machinations of the road designers in Leeds…..after a not impossible journey we arrived at Roudhay Park, more specifically at Tropical World, with Granddaughter Amelia in tow. We knew it would be hot in the glasshouses from last time, but it didn’t actually seem that bad, perhaps we have become used to the heat these past few days. Stock levels of butterflies and birds were a bit low, but no doubt that is because of the pandemic closure. However, it was all good and Amelia enjoyed it all and we managed to shoot some images. I was using the Pentax K-1 full frame DSLR with the HD Pentax-D FA 28-105mm WR lens. So first some images from Tropical World:
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Then we wandered up towards the Mansion, taking in the speciality gardens on the way. There were also a couple of wedding shoots going on, so I pinched a couple of quick candids as well. The kit was expanded to include the SMC Pentax-FA J 75-300mm and the SMC Pentax-F 17-28mm Fisheye Zoom. This is quite useful, being compact and a full frame fisheye at 17mm, gradually becoming more rectilinear as we approach 28mm.
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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : a walk in the park

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

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A Walk in the Park

7 Jul 2021 10:37PM  
Views : 81
Unique : 70

A trip over to Walton Hall and Gardens today, a free park in Warrington, but actually quite an extensive area. Perhaps not as big as Heaton Park in Manchester, but still well worth a trip. There’s plenty for the kids, play areas, children’s zoo, high level woodland adventure….and plenty for the adults. A pity that the Cycle Museum was closed, but no doubt it will be open again soon.

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The glasshouses have been completely restored. The last time we were here they were a ruin, just like the ones in Buile Hill Park in Salford or those at RHS Bridgewater. Well, if Walton Hall and RHS Bridgewater can do it…..

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : places – heaton park, manchester

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Places – Heaton Park, Manchester

10 Jun 2021 3:22PM  
Views : 64
Unique : 53

It’s a refreshing change to visit a park that is actually in good nick and fully cared for, so full marks to Manchester City Council. We can still find woodland walks, a land train, a boating lake, a lakeside cafe, a children’s play area, a small farm, a bee keeping facility, a huge hall (albeit it rarely open), gardens, tree top adventures……..The last time we visited it was to photograph sister-in-law Diane and Lucy doing the Pretty Mudders event, and the last visit as a park might have been forty years before that. But, with lenses to review and seeking new places for test shots, here we were again, with the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG DN Art lens mounted on the Sony A7R III.

It was a gloriously sunny day, which is actually a mixed blessing, but things went well. We concentrated on the area around the hall and the dowager house, taking in the northern woodland as well. Lunch in the stables cafe was a foregone conclusion. Next time we’ll try the southern woodland, the lake, the tram museum and the land train. It is a huge site and there is too much to explore in just one visit.

So here are some pictures from the day’s shoot.

Bee keepers behind the Dowager House.
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Deep within the woodland the colours can sometimes become pretty intense.
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One of the old farm buildings, still in use.
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Sue under the boughs of this magnificent tree.
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Within the woodland, we strayed from the main path and found this delightful pond.
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A canopy of trees within the woodland.
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Park Cameras increases focus on second-hand, reports strong sales despite lockdowns

Park Cameras increases focus on second-hand, reports strong sales despite lockdowns

Park Cameras has passed on the reins of its business to its team following the sale of investors shares to employees. The company, established 50 years ago by industry veteran Reg Atkins with just £500 in the bank, is now an Employee Ownership Trust (EOT).

Park Cameras increases focus on second-hand, reports strong sales despite lockdowns 17

Park’s London store employees

“Our family of employees are the heart and soul of the business and I’m extremely proud of every single one of them,” said current managing director, Roscoe Atkins. “The EOT will give us the chance to unlock value within the company and enable the team to become more invested both financially and emotionally in the business, whilst ensuring we never lose sight of what Park Cameras is renowned for.”

Park Cameras increases focus on second-hand, reports strong sales despite lockdowns 18

The company’s Burgess Hill HQ

With stores in central London and Burgess Hill, Park is planning to invest further in its senior management team and stores, increase sales online, and grow its sales of second-hand cameras and lenses. As widely reported by AP, the used camera and lens market continues to expand.

“With 50 years’ history of buying and selling used cameras, this is an expanding arm to the business, and it expects to double sales of used stock in the next three years,” Atkins added.

“Despite a challenging period during the pandemic, we have increased revenue by 65% over the last five years. Thanks to the continued development of online sales, advancements of camera and lens technology and the EOT, we envisage a further growth of over 50% in the next three years.”


Further reading
Park Cameras: “Lots of customers wanting conversations”

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Photographing Every National Park in Victoria, Australia

Photographing Every National Park in Victoria, Australia

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As a weekend photographer and keen explorer of our natural spaces, I recently(ish) set myself a photo project of capturing every land-based national park in my home state of Victoria, located in the south-east corner of Australia. Visiting all 45 of them took two years of regular trips, outside work and other travels.

The largest park is Alpine NP at 646,000ha (1.6 million acres) – an area that you could devote a lifetime of exploration to and barely touch the surface. At the other end of the scale is Lind NP at 1370ha with no tracks passing through it at all.

Many of these parks are within three hours’ drive of Melbourne and, as you can see, comprise a wide range of environments from snow, beach, desert, rainforest to dry eucalyptus bushland. Many areas are accessible by a family car, but you’ll need to hike for the best locations. If you’re planning a trip to Australia, I hope you’ll consider looking up a few of these spots – but if you’re not, hopefully you’ll be inspired to take up a similar photo project in your home area.

If you’ve been to a few of these places, I’d love to hear about your favourite spots!

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In terms of gear, I’m currently using a Nikon D610 DSLR, which gives me full frame quality in a package that’s not too heavy or bulky – something you appreciate when hiking up steep hills with it. When not multi-day hiking, I’ll usually use a lightweight travel tripod – a Benro GoPlus Travel FGP18C CF with a RRS BH30 ball head. Although the tripod limits the spontaneity, I find it lets you evaluate the composition more precisely, allowing small adjustments for more impact.

For the glassware, my Nikkor 16-35mm f4 VR and Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lenses do most of the heavy lifting, often with a polarizing filter. I almost always shoot with manual exposure and 14-bit uncompressed RAW files and use a di-GPS Eco ProSumer M unit to encode location metadata. Processing is generally kept to a minimum.

Here’s a quick glimpse of every Victorian national park – sometimes a wide vista, sometimes the native residents or just the small details. Each location has its own unique charm…

Alpine NP

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Alpine Peak Storm – Summer rain and lightning approach Mt Feathertop after sunset. This is a composite of two sequential shots, combining two lightning strikes. The lightning was infrequent, so I used the intervalometer mode of 10s shooting and 1s gap.

Nikon D600, 16-35 mm f/4 at 32 mm, 10.0 sec at f/5.6, ISO 100, tripod


Croajingolong NP

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Nature’s Mirror – Thurra River mouth in late afternoon light. A simple shot, using the natural look of the 50mm prime. No need for any fancy techniques with light like this!

Nikon D600, 50 mm f/1.4, 1/10 sec at f/16, ISO 100, tripod


Grampians NP

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Timber Frame – Sunrise over Mt Abrupt from The Picanninny. A long exposure to capture the breezy conditions and add some life to an otherwise static scene. Stopping down and focussing at hyperfocal distance allowed good depth of field throughout. A focus stack could have been used, at a sharper aperture, but the moving objects may not have blended well.

Nikon D300, 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 at 18 mm, 4.0 sec at f/22, ISO 100, tripod


Hattah-Kulkyne NP

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Mournpall Morning – Painterly sunrise textures of flooded trees on Lake Mournpall. HDR composite of three frames, with a 2-stop spread.

Nikon D600, 16-35 mm f/4 at 30 mm, 1.0 sec at f/8.0, ISO 100, tripod


Lower Glenelg NP

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Twisted Reality – Australian grass trees in flower. The tripod helped a difficult composition here, with a busy background and competing subject elements.

Nikon D600, 16-35 mm f/4 at 16 mm, 1/500 sec at f/8.0, ISO 800, tripod


Mornington Peninsula NP

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Sunrise On The Pulpit – First light of day illuminates Pulpit Rock, Cape Schanck. Leaving home at 4am to catch sunrise here was well worth it, with only a few surfers nearby, I otherwise had the place to myself.

Nikon D610, 50 mm f/1.4, 30.0 sec at f/2.8, ISO 100, tripod


Mount Buffalo NP

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Vertical Limits – Two climbers on Ozymandias (grade 22 M4), Australia’s most popular aid climbing route.

Nikon D300, 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 at 200 mm, 1/250 sec at f/5.6, ISO 200, handheld


Port Campbell NP

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Apostle Dreaming – With waves smoothed out by a long exposure the scene takes on a softer and calmer appearance, hiding the turbulent, eroding waves. The promontory in the distance was packed with tourists, all shooting into the sun. I went 1km further up and had this spot to myself, with a striking front light.

Nikon D610, 16-35 mm f/4 at 22 mm, 8.0 sec at f/16, ISO 100, tripod


Wilsons Promontory NP

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Beach For Two – View from Mt Oberon of Norman Beach. With drone use restricted in Victorian national parks, you need to climb a mountain for these sort of views. The 1-hour slog was worth it and the crowds left at sunset, missing a great afterglow and starry sky with green airglow. Bring a torch for your return journey and drive slowly – I had to avoid 14 wombats on the road home at 1am!

Nikon D300, 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 at 200 mm, 1/750 sec at f/5.6, ISO 200, tripod


And here is a glimpse of the other 36 parks. For more details on these, click here.

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Clockwise from top-left: Budj Bim NP, Snowy River NP, Point Nepean NP, French Island NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Baw Baw NP, Yarra Ranges NP, Kara Kara NP, Greater Bendigo NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Burrowa-Pine Mountain NP, Barmah NP, Alfred NP, Lind NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Brisbane Ranges NP, Coopracambra NP, Tarra-Bulga NP, Cobboboonee NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Errinundra NP, Wyperfeld NP, Little Desert NP, Mitchell River NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Kinglake NP, Warby-Ovens NP, Churchill NP, Morwell NP
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Mount Richmond NP, Heathcote-Graytown NP, Great Otway NP, Dandenong Ranges NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Murray-Sunset NP, Terrick Terrick NP, Gunbower NP, The Lakes NP
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Clockwise from top-left: Organ Pipes NP, Lower Goulburn NP, Chiltern-Mount Pilot NP, Lake Eildon NP

And now that it’s “complete”? I’ll keep going back to get the best light, the best season, those fleeting moments with wildlife… The project will always be a “work in progress” and I wouldn’t have it any other way!

Having been restricted to 5km essential travel since July, I’m keen to get back out there soon.


About the author: Jason Freeman is a graphic designer based in Melbourne, Australia. After completing a Bachelor of Applied Science in Photography, he began work in aerial surveying, transitioning to creative roles in multimedia, video and print. He is an Adobe Certified Expert in InDesign, Photoshop & Lightroom. As a keen hiker and traveller, the camera is always close at hand.

To view his latest images, or for comments or questions, visit his folio site GoWild Images.

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Robotic Nikon D5 DSLRs Installed at Boston Red Sox’s Fenway Park

Robotic Nikon D5 DSLRs Installed at Boston Red Sox's Fenway Park

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The Boston Red Sox professional baseball team has partnered with Nikon to have automatic robot cameras installed across its iconic Fenway Park.

Nikon Professional Services (NPS) installed five state-of-the-art Robotic Pods by Mark Roberts Motion Control (MRMC) at various key locations in the park.

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The Robotic Pod by Mark Roberts Motion Control (MRMC), a Nikon Group Company

The modular camera system housing can be controlled through a custom software interface by a remote operator, and the cameras will be used to capture high-quality photos and videos of Red Sox games during COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

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The MHC client interface.

Inside the weatherproof Robotic Pod housings are Nikon D5 flagship DSLRs with Nikon 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G AF-S VR lenses attached. Other lenses can also be swapped in for different photo needs.

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“In the era of social distancing and COVID-19 related constraints, the remote system from automated capture experts MRMC, a Nikon group company, is the solution that minimizes risk and offers operators and photographers a safe way to remotely control cameras to capture amazing content — with the added benefit of more creative options than ever before,” Nikon says.

The cameras can now be found on the roof of the press box, on the first and third baselines, overlooking center field and the bullpen, and right behind home plate.

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Photographers shooting with the pods have 360-degree movement and zooming capabilities with the ability to pes-set capture points. They can also remotely adjust focus, exposure, and other camera settings.

“With the system, the photographer/operator can capture high quality photos and videos for broadcast, social media and marketing needs while reducing proximity to other staff and players and gain remote access to restricted areas,” Nikon says. “In fact, a photographer can cover an entire game without ever leaving the booth.”

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