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PGYTECH Snaplock Quick-Release System Collection Review

PGYTECH Snaplock Quick-Release System Collection Review

P1010045 | 1/80 sec | f/3.2 | 28.0 mm | ISO 200
 

Quick Verdict

The PGYTECH Snaplock System offers a varied and useful collection of accessories that are compatible with a wide range of photography kit. Thanks to features such as ‘push to install’, the accessories are really easy and quick to use. Plus, the anti-loosening design of the plate accessories brings peace of mind that your camera is safe and secure in use. There’s definitely a quick-release accessory for every type of photographer in this collection.

+ Pros

  • Easy to use
  • Quick to install
  • Secure
  • Lightweight
  • Good build quality
  • Widely compatible  

– Cons

  • MultipleSnapLock Plate Adapters/Plates needed to make the most of the system (if you have multiple cameras)
  • Some cameras/lenses feel heavy on the Beetle Camera Clip

 

PGYTECH has introduced a line-up of accessories for photographers, vloggers and smartphoneographers who are looking for quicker and more efficient ways to carry and use their cameras. The PGYTECH Snaplock Quick-Release System features a SnapLock Plate Adapter, SnapLock Beetle Came Clip, Action Camera SnapLock Plate, SnapLock NANO Sviwil and Tilt Mount so it seems there’s an accessory for everyone but are they any good? We’ve been putting them to the test to find out. 

 

PGYTECH Snaplock System Features

As mentioned above, the PGYTECH Snaplock Quick-Release System features four main accessories and if you take a look at the PGYTECH website, you’ll notice there’s also a Snaplock Plate Nano and a Snaplock Reverse Ball Head, however, we’re not reviewing these two accessories today. 

We’ll take a look at each of the products individually as they’re all slightly different even though they’re part of the same collection. 

 

Beetle Camera Clip 

20211013 095956 | 1/100 sec | f/1.8 | 5.4 mm | ISO 160
 

The Beetle Camera Clip removes the need for you to hold your camera or have it around your neck on a strap when it’s not in use. The Beetle Camera Clip enables you to quickly mount and lock your camera securely onto a bag strap or belt and to remove it ready for action, all you have to do is press a button. There’s even a lock so it won’t accidentally come undone when walking and the back features anti-slip rubber so it holds onto a strap more securely. 

An Arca-Swiss compatible SnapLock plate is used in conjunction with the Bettle Camera Clip which means it’s compatible with various devices and the plate features a patented tight-fitting screw to prevent it from coming loose. You can also fasten your camera to the SnapLock plate in any direction so when you’re using a heavier lens, you can mount it horizontally to distribute weight better. 

The main body of the clip is made from an aluminium alloy so it’s strong but lightweight and its size means it easily fits in a pocket. 

Key Features: 

  • Arca-Swiss compatible SnapLock quick release camera plate
  • Attaches to most backpack straps or belts
  • Hands-free carrying 
  • Easy to clamp design
  • Installation in any direction
  • Patented tight-fitting screw
  • Pocket size, easy to carry
  • Aluminium alloy construction

 

Snaplock Plate Adapter

P1010050 | 1/100 sec | f/3.2 | 23.0 mm | ISO 200
 

The Snaplock Plate Adapter makes mounting cameras to tripods and other accessories as easy as one click. The SnapLock Plate Adapter’s mounting base uses a clamp that locks by itself rather than a knob you have to tighten manually which means you can mount the SnapLock Plate, used throughout this collection, in one simple step. There’s also a button you can press to ensure the system won’t unlock itself. 

An Arca-Swiss interface on the side as well as 1/4” and 3/8” threaded holes found on the bottom, make the Snaplock Plate Adapter compatible with a wide range of gimbals, plates, tripods and sliders.

Key Features: 

  • Multifunctional interfaces for wide compatibility
  • Patented SnapLock System
  • One-step attachment 
  • The square SnapLock Plate allows you to quickly mount it in any direction
  • Pocket size, easy to carry
  • Aluminium alloy construction

 

Snaplock Nano Swivel & Tilt Mount

P1010057 | 1/100 sec | f/3.2 | 35.0 mm | ISO 200
 

For those who need a mount that offers more fluidity, the Snaplock Nano Swivel & Tilt Mount can swivel 360-degrees and tilts through 180-degrees with adjustable damping so operation is smooth. As with all of the products in this range, this accessory features patented technology (PGYTECH SnapLock Nanosystem) that allows the user to quickly and easily mount/dismount gear. There’s an extra lock to ensure your camera is securely attached and a square cold shoe mount can be quickly attached in any direction. The patented 1/4” screw lets you securely fix the plate or cold shoe mount in place and the cold shoe mount’s rotate-to-lock knob contains a patented screw, which prevents it from loosening. 

The Snaplock Nano Swivel & Tilt Mount can be used with monitors and it also functions as a mini tripod head so you can connect a smartphone or camera to the device (tripod not included). 

Key Features: 

  • 360° swivelling and 180° tilting
  • PGYTECH SnapLock Nanosystem allows you to easily (dis)mount your gear
  • The extra lock ensures your gear is securely fastened to the mount
  • A square cold shoe mount can be quickly snapped on in any direction
  • The patented 1/4” screw lets you securely fix the plate or cold shoe mount in place
  • The cold shoe mount’s rotate-to-lock knob contains a patented screw, which prevents it from undoing
  • Multifunctional interface for wide compatibility 

 

Action Camera Snaplock Plate Arca-Swiss

P1010059 | 1/100 sec | f/3.2 | 33.0 mm | ISO 200
 

The Action Camera Snaplock Plate, as the name suggests, is for Action Cameras and it features a ball head structure for swivelling (360-degrees) and tilting (32-degrees). It features PGYTECH’s quick-release pin so mounting/dismounting an action camera is easy – simply unlock the pin then rotate it 90-degrees to lock/unlock the pin. 

The square shape is Arca-Swiss compatible so you can use it with tripods or PGYTECH’s Beatle Camera Clip and the universal interface as well as the 1/4”-20 conversion adapter makes the Action Camera Snaplock Plate widely compatible with many popular action cameras from brands such as GoPro and DJI. 

The base of the plate and the ball head are made from aluminium which means it’s light and the size makes it easy to carry around. 

Key Features:

  • Ball head structure
  • A Quick-release pin allows you to instantly (dis)mount your gear
  • The universal interface and the 1/4”-20 conversion adapter for wide compatibility
  • The square shape is Arca-Swiss compatible
  • Aluminium alloy construction

 

PGYTECH Snaplock System Handling & Performance

P1010029 | 1/125 sec | f/3.5 | 30.0 mm | ISO 200
 

All of the accessories on review that are found in the PGYTECH Snaplock System are compact in size and lightweight which means they easily fit in a camera bag or even a pocket for easy transportation. They’re also made really well with the aluminium alloy feeling reassuringly strong and all components fitting well. Lock buttons are easy to push and give peace of mind that your camera isn’t going to fall off the mount it’s attached to. We also like the rubberised textures that give the accessories extra grip when attached to a camera and/or strap. 

The anti-loosening design of the plate brings reassurance that your kit is safe (PGY even provide Alun keys so you can tighten the bolt easily) and the simple ‘push-to-install’ system the plate and adapter offers makes the mounting/dismounting of gear quick.

 

20211013 100008 | 1/134 sec | f/1.8 | 5.4 mm | ISO 50
 

You don’t have to worry about the direction you fit the SnapLock Plate in either as the square shape means you can quickly mount it in any direction. It also uses the Arca-Swiss standardized size, which is compatible with most Arca-Swiss plates. Also Arca-Swiss compatible is the SnapLock Mounting Base with 1/4” and 3/8” threaded holes so you can use the device with a wide variety of gimbals, plates, tripods and sliders.

 

P1010048 | 1/160 sec | f/4.0 | 23.0 mm | ISO 200
 

If you own multiple cameras and supports, one slight snag is that you would need to purchase multiple SnapLock Plate Adapters or Plates so you can switch from sliders to tripods or swap cameras easily. If, however, you have one camera and one tripod, you’ll find the SnapLock Plate Adapter system so easy to use and it really does save time. It’s one of the easiest quick release plate systems we’ve used with a simple press of a button releasing the camera from the support. The plate also easily slides/clicks into place and feels incredibly secure. If you use the Alun key to tighten the plate to your camera there’s no movement once it’s in the SnapLcok Mounting Base and the extra lock gives double reassurance that your camera is safe.  

 

P1010056 | 1/100 sec | f/3.2 | 35.0 mm | ISO 200
 

The SnapLock Nano Swivel and Tilt Mount is an ideal accessory for vloggers as it can be attached to a handheld tripod as the 1/4”-20 screw hole on the bottom and the 1/4”-20 screw on the top enable it to function as a mini tripod head. It also features the square mount design so you can quickly mount it in any direction and use the built-in push button to make sure it’s secure. For further peace of mind, the SnapLock Nano plate’s 1/4”-20 screw and the cold shoe mount’s rotate-to-lock knob contain a patented screw with a mini thrust needle roller bearing so you can fix the plate or cold shoe mount securely in place. 

Once your camera is secure, you can swivel and tilt the mount and the damping means you can adjust the swivel up to 360-degrees and the tilt up to 180-degrees smoothly. 

 

P1010061 | 1/100 sec | f/3.2 | 33.0 mm | ISO 200
 

Also designed for action cameras is the Action Camera SnapLock Plate which features a ball head that enables 360°swiveling and 32° tilting so you can lock it in various positions. The handy quick-release pin features so you can quickly and easily mount/dismount gear to it and it’s also compatible with multiple action cameras so a wider variety of customers will be able to purchase and use the adapter. The square shape is, again, Arca-Swiss compatible and it can be used with Arca-type tripod heads or the PGYTECH Beetle Camera Clip so you can capture footage on the move hands-free.

 

P1010030 | 1/100 sec | f/3.5 | 17.0 mm | ISO 200
 

The Beetle Camera Clip is the final device in our collection of Snaplock System accessories and it’s a device you can fasten to your backpack strap or belt to secure your camera to when it’s not in use. It’s designed to relieve pressure on your neck as you don’t need a camera strap and it keeps your hands free for the setting up of tripods etc. Basically, this device provides a quick-access solution to your camera when you don’t want to stow it away. 

Mounting and locking the camera in place is really easy as there are no knobs to twist/secure, instead, you just press one button to slide the plate in/out which moves smoothly. The same button doubles up as a lock to keep the plate in place when mounted to the clip. 

 

20211013 095921 | 1/100 sec | f/1.8 | 5.4 mm | ISO 125
 

To secure the clip to a strap or belt, you need to lift the small handle which is reassuringly stiff and lifts with a ‘click’. You’ll then see there are 3 steps (PGYTECH call them gears) that allow different strap thicknesses to be secured. A strap up to 75mm wide with a maximum thickness of 15mm and a minimum thickness of 1mm thick can be used with the Beetle Camera Clip. Once over your strap/belt, you resecure the lock you lifted up to hold the device in place. 

The Bettle Camera Clip does hold a camera/lens well but it did take us a while to trust it simply because we’re so used to using a camera strap. You can feel the weight when using longer lenses and we did find ourselves reaching to hold the camera at first but after a while, we did stop doing this. After getting used to the system, we soon found ourselves comfortably walking around, hands-free and with no camera banging around on a strap. Plus, it’s really easy to get the camera off the clip when needed as all you have to do is switch the lock, press it in and pull your camera off the clip. We found it equally secure when using either a backpack strap or belt to fasten it to but sitting the camera horizontally rather than vertically when on a bag strap does help distribute weight better. 

The SnapLock plate the clip is compatible with does grip a camera well, with the patented tight-fitting screw doing exactly what it’s designed to do, too. 

 

Value For Money

The accessories in the PGYTECH Snaplock System have the following prices:

You’ll also need a Snaplock Plate if not purchasing it in a set with the Beetle Camera Clip or Snaplock Plate Adapter which is priced at $14.90. 

All of the products are rather reasonably priced but if you did want to purchase multiple plates or adapters, the cost could soon start adding up. These prices also don’t take custom fees, VAT, duty and tax you may have to pay into consideration – please check before purchasing. 

Alternative camera clips include the Capture Camera Clip from Peak Design priced at just over £50 while various Arca-swiss quick-release plates are available on Amazon ranging in prices along with various plate adapters

For more opinions on photography accessories, have a look at our reviews

 

PGYTECH Snaplock System Verdict

All of the accessories are really easy to use, are well made and will securely hold your camera but to get the most out of the Snaplock Plate Adapter functionality, you’ll need to purchase multiple adapters if you have different supports or buy multiple Snaplock Plates if you have more than one camera so you can quickly swap them in and out of use. However, those who own just one camera and support don’t have to worry about this so will find the system does speed up workflow and makes connecting/disconnecting a camera to a support really easy. 

The action camera accessories offer smooth panning and tilting while the Beetle Clip is a useful way to keep your hands free and your neck more comfortable when not taking photos. 

Thanks to features such as ‘push to install’, the accessories are really easy and quick to use. Plus, the anti-loosening design of the plate accessories brings peace of mind that your camera is safe and secure in use.

Overall, the PGYTECH Snaplock System offers a varied and useful collection of accessories that are compatible with a wide range of photography kit which means there’s definitely a quick-release accessory for every type of photographer in this collection.

 

PGYTECH Snaplock System Pros

  • Easy to use
  • Quick to install
  • Secure
  • Lightweight
  • Good build quality
  • Widely compatible 

 

PGYTECH Snaplock System Cons

  • MultipleSnapLock Plate Adapters/Plates needed to make the most of the system (if you have multiple cameras)
  • Some cameras/lenses feel heavy on the Beetle Camera Clip

Own this product? Let us know what you think of it in the EQDB

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SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 1

G-Technology has been a mainstay brand for photographers for years, but was recently rebranded under SanDisk Professional. While the products now have a new name, has anything else changed?

I have been a huge fan of G-Tech products since I got into the industry, and I still use a G-Tech RAID array every day. But recently, Western Digital decided that it was going to fold the G-Tech product line under SanDisk (it owns both brands in addition to its own WD brand) and while the products right now still share the iconic “G” logo, the G-Technologies name is nowhere to be found on the packaging.

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 2

I actually think this is a pretty smart move, and puts the product line under the far more well-known SanDisk name. But rebrands sometimes don’t always mean good things when it comes to product performance, so we decided to see if anything other than the name changed. To that end, let’s take a look at the new SanDisk Professional G-Drive SSSD and G-Drive Armor ATD.

I’m happy to report that not only does the product seem to be as high-quality as it has always been, in the case of the G-Drive SSD, performance has actually improved.

SanDisk Professional G-Drive SSD

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 3

Let’s start with the G-Drive SSD. I actually reviewed the original iteration of this product several years ago and praised the speed and design of the miniature storage device. Side by side, very little has changed with the rebrand other than the subtle color under the grills on the front and back of the drive: what was once a shiny blue is now a more subtle silver.

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 4

Honestly, I prefer the blue but it doesn’t appreciably take away from the look of this drive — it’s still a very attractive little SSD. Size and weight are pretty much identical as is the support for USB-C but not Thunderbolt. Back in 2018 when I first reviewed the original, I found the speeds to be totally in line with the cost and more than enough to appease even the most demanding photographers.

I rechecked those numbers in a speed test performed on my MacBook Pro, with the results below:

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 5

That’s still great, but the new version of this drive smokes those speeds:

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 6

SanDisk’s new iteration of this drive more than doubles the write speed and nearly doubles the read speed. While I was unable to replicate the promised 1050 MB/s on the box, the 928 MB/s write speed and 903 MB/s read speeds is fast enough to support most video formats and will easily chew through even the highest resolution photos. You do not need to worry about working directly off this drive, that much is for sure.

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 7

When I first reviewed the G-Drive Mobile SSD, the 500GB version cost $189. This new SanDisk-branded version costs $140 and has much better performance. From where I am standing, that’s a win. It is also available in 1TB and 2TB configurations for $230 and $360 respectively.

SanDisk Professional G-Drive Armor ATD

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 8

Not everyone needs super high speeds and some are willing to prioritize ruggedness and price over it. While marketing often shows drives like this braving the elements while a photographer edits in the snow or on the side of a mountain, realistically that’s not a real-world, practical application you’ll see very often.

When I ran my own production company, sometimes clients would request large amounts of video footage at original quality, which would be an absolute nightmare to send digitally. What is much faster is sending a storage drive through the mail. As you might expect though, that’s a big risk if the drive isn’t robust enough to handle the trip.

The Armor ATD only boasts up to 140 MB/s transfer speeds on the box, but for the purpose I just described, that’s plenty. That allows me to move about 50GB of photos and videos to it in around eight minutes, which is more than fast enough for sharing content with a client — no one is planning to edit off this thing.

Below are the read and write speeds according to our testing, which do not quite meet the promises on the box but are still fine for the intended use cases:

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 9

The drive is small and light for an HDD-based storage device and is crush-resistant up to 1,000 pounds, drop-resistant up to 1.2 meters (about 4 feet), and is IP53 rain and dust resistant thanks to a little rubber stopper that blocks the USB-C port at the top of the drive.

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 10

All this is pretty affordable, too, as 1TB costs $90. It is also available in 2TB, 4TB, and 5TB configurations for $110, $150, and $180 respectively.

G-Tech’s Reputation is in Good Hands

One thing to note is that the cables that are included with the two drives aren’t consistent, which I thought was a bit strange. For example, both ship with USB-C cables of equal length, but one bears the “G” logo and the other does not. Additionally, one set of cables was wrapped in plastic and the other was wrapped in paper. This inconsistency I find strange since both are from the same company and were produced at what I would assume was around the same time. I’ll chalk this up to transition pains as neither of these actually result in discernable quality issues, but I did find it worth mentioning.

SanDisk Professional G-Drives: New Name, Better Performance 11

If you were worried or confused with the changes at G-Tech, at least the branding change hasn’t affected product performance. If anything, the products are better and cheaper than they were before, which I see as a win.


Welcome to a PetaPixel Showcase, in which our staff gives you a hands-on with unique and interesting products from across the photography landscape. The Showcase format affords manufacturers the opportunity to sponsor hands-on time with their products and our staff and lets them highlight what features they think are worth noting, but the opinions expressed from PetaPixel staff are genuine. Not all Showcase stories are sponsored, but when they are it will be clearly disclosed. Showcases should not be considered an endorsement by PetaPixel.

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Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance

Released in March 2021 and priced so as to land in our High-end ($400-$599) segment, the Realme GT 5G brings with it some very attractive features. Let’s take a look at how it performed in our comprehensive array of battery tests.

Key specifications:

  • Battery capacity: 4500 mAh
  • 65W charger
  • 6.43-inch, 1080 x 2400, 120 Hz AMOLED display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 5G (5 nm) chipset
  • Tested RAM / storage combination: 12 GB + 256 GB

About DXOMARK Battery tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone battery reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective tests over a week-long period both indoors and outdoors. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. (See our introductory and how we test articles for more details about our smartphone Battery protocol.)

Test summary

Pros

  • A charging beast — very fast
  • Decent on the go performance for its segment

Cons

  • Autonomy performances in our calibrated use cases are quite poor, especially for video playback

The Realme GT 5G brings with it some impressive specs at its price point. Despite a lackluster autonomy performance, its overall score places it at the top of the High-end segment, though it is just slightly above average in the Battery protocol database as a whole.

We compared the Realme GT 5G’s performance in several key categories with the Premium-segment ($600-799) OnePlus 9 device and with another High-end device, the Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro 5G; battery capacity, charger, display type and resolution, and processor specifications for all three devices are shown in the table below.

Realme GT 5GOnePlus 9Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro 5G
Battery capacity (mAh)4500 mAh4500 mAh5000 mAh
Charger

65W

65W33W
Wireless

No

Yes

No

Display type

OLEDOLED

LCD

Display resolution

1080 x 2400 FHD

1080 x 2400 FHD

1080 x 2400 FHD

Chipset

Qualcomm Snapdragon 888Qualcomm Snapdragon 888

Qualcomm Snapdragon 865

Autonomy (55)

How long a battery charge lasts depends not only on battery capacity, but also on other aspects of the phone’s hardware and software. The DXOMARK Battery autonomy score is composed of three performance sub-scores: (1) Stationary, (2) On the go, and (3) Calibrated use cases. Each sub-score comprises the results of a comprehensive range of tests for measuring autonomy in all kinds of real-life scenarios.

Light Usage

72h

Light

Active: 2h30/day

Moderate Usage

52h

Moderate

Active: 4h/day

Intense Usage

33h

Intense

Active: 7h/day

Compared to its two rivals in this review, the Realme GT 5G comes in last for autonomy, with the Oneplus and the Xiaomi scoring 56 and 62, respectively.

You can trust the Realme’s battery gauge to show you how much power your battery has left.

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 12

Stationary

Vivo Y72 5G

Best: Vivo Y72 5G (104)

A robot housed in a Faraday cage performs a set of touch-based user actions during what we call our “typical usage scenario” (TUS) — making calls, video streaming, etc. — 4 hours of active use over the course of a 16-hour period, plus 8 hours of “sleep.” The robot repeats this set of actions every day until the device runs out of power. 

The Realme GT 5G lasted 56 hours 10 minutes in our TUS testing, coming in behind the OnePlus 9, which lasted 57 hours 24 minutes, and behind the Xiaomi, which lasted 61 hours 13 minutes.

Typical Usage Scenario discharge curves

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 13

On the go

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (96)

Using a smartphone on the go takes a toll on autonomy because of extra “hidden” demands, such as the continuous signaling associated with cellphone network selection, for example. DXOMARK Battery experts take the phone outside and perform a precisely defined set of activities while following the same three-hour travel itinerary for each device.

The Realme did a great job here compared to its rivals (the OnePlus at 58 and the Xiaomi at 56). It bests its competitors in all the test cases, especially for calling and camera, where its autonomy is considerably better. For other use cases, its performance is slightly above the average across our database.

Estimated autonomy for on the go use cases (full charge)

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 14

Calibrated

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (100)

For this series of tests, the smartphone returns to the Faraday cage and our robots repeatedly perform actions linked to one specific use case (such as gaming, video streaming, etc.) at a time. Starting from an 80% charge, all devices are tested until they have expended at least 5% of their battery power.

The Realme GT 5G comes in behind the OnePlus (58) and the Xiaomi (62) in our calibrated tests, with particularly poor performances for video playback and music streaming. It is slightly above average when gaming and when video streaming via Wi-Fi, and it put in a decent performance for 3G calling, coming in ahead of the Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro.

Estimated autonomy for calibrated use cases (full charge)

Charging (102)

The DXOMARK Battery charging score is composed of two sub-scores, Full charge and Quick boost. Full charge tests assess the reliability of the battery power gauge; measure how long it takes to charge a battery from 0% to 80% capacity and from 80% to 100%; and measure how long and how much power the battery takes to go from an indicated 100% to an actual full charge. With the phone at different charge levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%), Quick boost tests measure the amount of charge the battery receives after being plugged in for 5 minutes. 

Wired

Wired

Power consumption and battery level during full charge

Charging is the Realme GT 5G’s strong point, putting it among the top 3 in this category as of this writing. The OnePlus 9 has a slightly better score thanks to its wireless charger, but the two devices are very close — and indeed, the charging technology is almost the same for both.

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 15

Full charge

OnePlus 9

Best: OnePlus 9 (106)

It takes the Realme GT 5G only 34 minutes 17 seconds to fully charge its battery, which is currently the second-best performance in our database, which is a great achievement in this price range. It is slightly better than the OnePlus (38 minutes 40 seconds), and it comes as no surprise that the Xiaomi (with its 33W charger) is far behind at 1 hour 09 minutes.

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 16

Quick boost

A very good score here — in fact, the Realme is tied for first with the Oppo Find X3 Neo in this category. Charging the Realme GT 5G for 5 minutes with 20% charge remaining provides nearly 8 hours of autonomy, which is twice as much as the Xiaomi.

Realme GT 5GOnePlus 9Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro 5G
Autonomy boost (hh:mm)20%7:478:263:50
40%7:205:593:58
60%5:075:283:48
80%3:454:023:23
Percentage boost20%21.7 %23 %9.5 %
40%20.5 %16.3 %9.9 %
60%14.3 %14.9 %9.5 %
80%10.5 %11 %8.4 %
Energy consumed20%4783 mWh4923 mWh2416 mWh
40%4505 mWh3491 mWh2498 mWh
60%3148 mWh3188 mWh2397 mWh
80%2308 mWh2354 mWh2131 mWh

Efficiency (66)

Our Efficiency score comprises two sub-scores, Charge up and Discharge. Charge up is the efficiency of a full charge (how much energy is drained from the wall outlet vs the energy capacity of the battery, as well as the efficiency of the charger and its residual consumption). Discharge is how much current the smartphone drains from the battery when in use (the ratio of battery capacity to autonomy). Better autonomy with a smaller battery means better efficiency.

Despite good Charge up efficiency, the Realme lands in the lower half of our database for overall efficiency, as its discharge performance is quite poor.

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 17

Charge up

OnePlus 9

Best: OnePlus 9 (84)

At 84, the OnePlus not only beats the Realme and Xiaomi in our comparison, it is the best for Charge up efficiency in our overall database so far. However, all three devices in this comparison are fairly close in terms of the efficiency of their respective adapters.

Realme GT 5G Battery review: Strong charging performance 18

Discharge

Apple iPhone 12 mini

Best: Apple iPhone 12 mini (121)

With particularly high discharge current during video playback and when idling (screen off, wifi on), the Realme comes in behind both the OnePlus and Xiaomi in this category.

Conclusion

The Realme GT 5G has just average autonomy, providing 52 hours of moderate use. But if you are looking for a powerful device under $600 that charges very fast, the Realme GT 5G will definitely fit the bill.

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Sony Xperia 5 III Smartphone Review

Sony Xperia 5 III Smartphone Review

P1010020 | 1/125 sec | f/3.5 | 17.0 mm | ISO 200
 

 

Quick Verdict

The Sony Xperia 5 III smartphone shares some of the excellent features found on the more expensive Sony Xperia 1 III but in a smaller, easier to hold body that’s also got a better price tag. The camera is great, taking true-to-life photos and if you have the patience to learn how to use the Pro Mode then you’ll capture even better shots. If you can get on with the unusual dimensions and want a smartphone with premium tech that’s not priced at over £1000, the Xperia 5 III could be for you. 

+ Pros

  • Good screen 
  • Good image quality 
  • A useful line-up of cameras 
  • Compact shape
  • Excellent battery life 

– Cons

  • Still quite expensive
  • No wireless charging
  • The design won’t be for everyone

 

 

The Sony Xperia 5 III updates the Sony Xperia 5 II and as its predecessor did with the Sony Xperia 1 II, The Sony Xperia 5 III shares quite a few of the specs found on the Sony Xperia 1 III but as a price point more of us can afford.  

It’s priced at around £899 which is still quite expensive and £100 more than the Sony Xperia 5 II was priced at launch so we’re going to be taking a close look at this new smartphone to find out if the price equates to good value for money or if your cash will be better spent elsewhere. 

 

Sony Xperia 5 III Features

P1010011 | 1/125 sec | f/4.0 | 14.0 mm | ISO 200
 

The Sony Xperia 5 III features the same cameras as the Xperia 1 III but there’s no time-of-flight sensor for judging depth and it has a 6.1-inch screen as well as a 3.5mm audio jack. A new 30W charger is included in the box of the Xperia 5 III, too. 

As for the cameras, you get a 16mm ultra-wide, 24mm wide and a 70-105mm telephoto lens (all 12MP) with 20fps continuous shooting on offer as well as Sony’s Dual PDAF technology. There’s a 6.1-inch, tall and long 21:9 ratio screen (a USP of Sony smartphones), a 3.5mm stereo jack and a 4500mAh battery (improved over the Xperia 5 II). You also get 4K video, a Pro video mode, two memory options that are expandable with a MicroSD, water/dust resistance and an 8MP 24mm selfie camera. 

If it’s all sounding a bit familiar, that’s because quite a few of the specs are shared with the Xperia 5 II:

 

SpecsSony Xperia 5 IIISony Xperia 5 II
Rear Camera12 MP, f/1.7, 24mm (wide) with Dual Pixel PDAF, OIS, 12 MP, f/2.3, 70mm – 105mm f/2.8 (telephoto) with Dual Pixel PDAF, 3x/4,4x optical zoom, OIS, 12 MP, f/2.2, 16mm (ultrawide) with Dual Pixel PDAF12 MP, f/1.7, 24mm (wide) with Dual Pixel PDAF, OIS, 12 MP, f/2.4, 70mm (telephoto) with PDAF, 3x optical zoom, OIS, 12 MP, f/2.2, 16mm (ultrawide) with Dual Pixel PDAF
Front Camera8MP f/2.0 24mm Wide Angle Lens8MP f/2.0 24mm Wide Angle Lens
Display6.1″ OLED display6.1″ OLED display 
Video4K, FullHD (5-axis gyro-EIS, OIS)4K, FullHD (5-axis gyro-EIS, OIS)
USBUSB-CUSB-C
Battery4500mAh (no wireless charging)4000mAh (no wireless charging)
Weight168g163g
Dimensions157 x 68 x 8.2mm158 x 68 x 8mm
Memory128GB/8GB RAM or 256GB/8GB RAM (microSDXC slot for expanded storage)128GB/8GB RAM or 256GB/8GB RAM (microSDXC slot for expanded storage)

 

Sony Xperia 5 III Key Features:

  • Triple Rear Camera: 12 MP, f/1.7, 24mm (wide) with Dual Pixel PDAF, OIS, 12 MP, f/2.3, 70mm – 105mm f/2.8 (telephoto) with Dual Pixel PDAF, 3x/4,4x optical zoom, OIS, 12 MP, f/2.2, 16mm (ultrawide) with Dual Pixel PDAF
  • Front Camera: 8MP f/2.0 24mm Wide Angle Lens
  • Display: 6.1″ OLED display
  • Zoom: 3X-.4X optical zoom (telephoto lens)
  • Optical Image Stabilisation
  • Phase-Detection Autofocus
  • Pro video and camera modes 
  • Video: 4K 24/25/30/60/120fps and HDR,1080p (5-axis gyro-EIS, OIS)
  • 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Type-C USB
  • 4500mAh battery with fast charging but no wireless charging
  • 128GB/8GB RAM or 256GB/8GB RAM (microSDXC slot for expanded storage)
  • Dimensions: 157 x 68 x 8.2mm
  • Weight: 168g

 

Sony Xperia 5 III Handling

P1010022 | 1/160 sec | f/4.0 | 17.0 mm | ISO 200
 

As mentioned, if you’ve read our review of the Sony Xperia 5 II or have held it in your own hands, you may be experiencing some deja vu as they are very similar in looks and specs. In fact, the Sony USP of a 21:9 aspect ratio display has been around for some time now which means you get a narrow smartphone with a big screen but the dimensions still won’t suit everyone. It does fit well in the hand, though, and you can easily control the smartphone one-handed. It’s also easier to hold and use than the Xperia 1 III it it shares specs with. 

The rounded edges/corners remain which makes the smartphone comfortable to hold and there’s still a chin as well as a slight bezel where the selfie camera sits at the top but along the sides, it’s pretty thin. 

On the right side of the smartphone, there are volume controls, a Google Assistant button and a shutter button for when you’re taking photos in a landscape orientation. There’s also a fingerprint sensor sandwiched in between these buttons as there’s not one built into the screen.

Turn your attention to the bottom of the Xperia 5 III and you find a USB-C port and on top is a 3.5mm headphone jack so you can charge your smartphone and use your headphones at the same time. 

On the back sits the triple camera housing which sits pretty flush to surfaces so there’s no rocking when it’s placed down but the back is a magnet for fingerprints (it doesn’t have the lovely matt finish the Xperia 1 III has) and its slipperiness means it has a habit of sliding so we recommend popping a case on it for added protection. 

 

P1010014 | 1/100 sec | f/3.2 | 26.0 mm | ISO 200
 

As for the display, it’s covered in Gorilla Glass 6 so it’ll be slightly more prone to scratches/cracks than the Xperia 1 III which has Gorilla Glass Victus but brightness levels are good and colours are accurate. There’s also a 120Hz refresh rate available for selection in the settings which will improve your viewing experience. For those creating visual content, there’s a Creator mode that will provide even better colour reproduction. 

It’s good to see an official IP rating which means the smartphone will survive a dunking up to 1.5m for 30 minutes and the 4,500mAh battery is impressive, providing plenty of power for a day’s use and improving on the 4000mAh battery found in the Xperia 5 II but it’s a shame wireless charging is still missing from a device at this price level. 

The camera set-up is similar to that on the Xperia 1 III with just the time-of-flight sensor which is used for judging depth missing but this didn’t cause any problems. However, as we’ve come to expect from Sony, you get some nice camera features built-in including Phase Detection Auto Focus, Optical Image Stabilisation (OIS), ZEISS optics and eye-tracking. 

Sony Xperia 5 III Camera Features:

  • 12 MP, f/1.7, 24mm (wide) with Dual Pixel PDAF, OIS
  • 12 MP, f/2.3, 70mm and f/1.8 105mm (telephoto) with PDAF, 3x-4.4x optical zoom, OIS
  • 12 MP, f/2.2, 16mm (ultrawide) with Dual Pixel PDAF
  • Front Camera: 8MP f/2.0 24mm Wide Angle Lens
  • Zoom: 3X and 4.4Xoptical zoom (telephoto lens)
  • Optical Image Stabilisation
  • Phase-Detection Autofocus
  • 20fps burst mode
  • Pro video and camera modes 

 

The camera app is very similar to other camera apps you’ll have used with basic modes such as panorama, selfie assistance and creative filters built-in. There are also round buttons to switch to the different lenses, modes found across the top of the screen and a big shutter button. You can click the screen to focus and adjust the exposure of an image, too. You’ll occasionally see a symbol pop up which is the AI looking at the scene in front and ensuring the optimal settings are selected to capture the best photo. 

To access the many Pro modes that are built-in you have to click the ‘basic’ wording that’s found top right. When you do, a wheel with various options such as P, S, M and Auto will appear along with explanations of what they’re used for. The tools on offer are in abundance and it can take some time to get used to how they all work but if you have the patience to harness their power, your photos will improve. The only mode you can’t access is aperture priority (there isn’t one) and you won’t find a dedicated night mode either. 

The two zoom lenses on the telephoto sensor is a different approach but there’s no real difference in speed when you compare with other smartphones that have separate telephoto cameras. 

 

P1010025 | 1/160 sec | f/4.0 | 17.0 mm | ISO 200
 

Video is captured in 4K at 24/25/30/60/120fps and HDR,1080p with 5-axis gyro-EIS and OIS to keep footage steady and you get access to a Pro video mode should you want more control over the settings used. 

Some will be impressed with the Pro modes on offer and use them all of the time but for most, the normal auto mode will be their go-to choice as it’s simpler to use and produces great results without too much effort. 

Battery life – The 4500mAh battery is really great and you’ll easily get a full day’s use out of the smartphone. It does support fast charging but not wireless. 

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Voigtlander 50mm F/1.2 Nokton E Lens Review

Voigtlander 50mm F/1.2 Nokton E Lens Review

50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

Voigtlander, ZEISS, Leica, Rollei, all fine German names from the top echelon of camera and lens manufacturers and all at the top of their game, in the case of Voigtlander from 1756 to the present day. Voigtlander is now a name owned by Cosina, who have consistently proved that they are more than up to continuing the fine standards that justify its use. We are looking at several Voigtlander lenses currently; having just reviewed the 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X for Fuji X mount we are now turning to the Sony E mount options. For Sony FE full-frame cameras, here is the Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E Aspherical, reviewed using the 42MP Sony A7R III. Let’s see how it handles and performs.

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E Handling and Features

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

This Voigtlander lens is of course a standard lens for the full-frame Sony E fit cameras, but can equally well be used on the crop frame bodies where the “35mm equivalent” field of view would be 75mm. However, in the latter case, the lens would be a bit out of scale and out of balance, dwarfing the crop frame body. Using the full-frame A7R III for this review, we have a heavy, 434g, optic, but one that fits the scale and balances well. There is a supplied round lens hood that screws into the 58mm filter thread. This affords a reasonable degree of protection for the front element.

The aperture ring is at the front of the lens and is equipped with delightfully designed click stops every one-third of a stop. The direction of travel of this ring follows Nikon/Pentax tradition, whereas the focusing ring is reversed and has Canon direction of travel. Back to the aperture ring, it also has a clever extra feature that enables the clicks to be disabled. This will be ideal for videographers, although there are no instructions provided as to how to do this and the only mention that it exists is in the small print on the website, but still with no instructions. Voigtlander paperwork with the lenses seems to follow the minimalistic route, to the extent that it tells us very little. To de-click the aperture ring, push the ring in front of it towards the camera body and rotate this ring until a yellow line is opposite the f/1.2 mark, as opposed to the white dot. This is called the Selective Aperture Control System.

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

The manual focus ring is the only method of focusing, this being a manual focus lens, and it turns smoothly and evenly through its range, from 0.45m. This is the standard near focusing limit for a 50mm lens. Distances are clearly marked in white for metres and not so clearly marked in red for feet. There is a meaningful depth of field scale provided.

The metal lens mount is well-engineered and carries electronic contacts, so EXIF information can be shared with the camera body, providing it is one of the following, which are all compatible electronically: X-H1, X-T4, X-T3, X-T2, X Pro-3, X-S10, X-E4 and X-T30. 

Optical construction is 8 elements in 6 groups, including 2 Aspherical. The aperture comprises 12 blades, a very generous number that bodes well for bokeh. It is not quite the 18 or more blades that vintage brass lenses had, but in a modern context very impressive.

Sadly, there is no weather resistance, but this lens does offer traditional construction and adding WR could well disturb the design ethos.

Voigtlander 50mm f/1.2 Nokton E
 

Some photographers find manual focus difficult, and if this is the case this may not be the lens for them, but the Sony cameras do offer various focusing aids and these work effectively and quickly. The biggest difficulty will be with the minuscule depth of field at f/1.2 which means that the merest movement or miss-focus will render the image as softer than it should be. Practice is the key, especially for those of us who have all but forgotten the joys of manual focus. These include the slower working, the easier selection and retention of a particular point of focus and of course the sheer tactile pleasure of a manual focusing ring.

 

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Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X Lens Review

Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X Lens Review

Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X

 

 

Voigtlander is one of the grand old names of German lens making, along with Zeiss and Rollei, and still exists today in its current incarnation of Cosina-owned Japanese manufacture. This brings modern design and manufacturing techniques to meet with traditional style lens design and materials, resulting in a very interesting range of manual focus lenses. The Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X is also a first of the range designed for Fuji X mount. Here we are using the 26MP Fujifilm X-S10 body to look in detail at the new lens and see if it has the potential to attract Fuji users, who already have a very fine range of AF and MF lenses available.

Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X Handling and Features

Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X
 

First impression is of a very nicely made metal-bodied lens, but more than that, a very tiny lens that is much more akin to a small Leica rangefinder lens than even a small DSLR prime. It weighs in at just 196g. It definitely looks the part on the Fujifilm X-S10, balancing perfectly with the camera body.

There is a tiny metal screw-in lens hood and this offers a small amount of protection to the front element. The filter size is 46mm, again more typical of a small rangefinder style lens.

The aperture ring is at the front of the lens and has a nice ribbed grip, all around apart from the area where the aperture values are etched and filled with clear white paint. The click stops cannot be switched off. They are however beautifully engineered, at one-third of a stop intervals. The direction of travel is the same as Nikon and Pentax DSLRs.

The manual focus ring, and of course there is no AF with the Voigtlander lens range, operates smoothly and with a well-judged degree of firmness to the action. The direction of the focus ring is traditional Canon. Focus distances are marked in a very visible white for metres and a rather dull and much harder to see red for feet. Focusing is down to 0.30m, or 1 foot, exactly what we would expect from a classic 35mm lens. Behind the manual focus ring is a well-marked and useful depth of field scale.

Voigtlander 35mm f/1.2 Nokton X
 

The metal lens mount is well-engineered and carries electronic contacts, so EXIF information can be shared with the camera body, providing it is one of the following, which are all compatible electronically: Х-Н1, Х-Т4, Х-Т3, Х-Т2, Х-Рrо3, Х-Ѕ10, Х-Е4, Х-Т30.

Optical construction is 8 elements in 6 groups. The diaphragm comprises a generous 12 blades, which suggests that bokeh could be very smooth.

So, in summary, we have a relatively tiny 35mm lens, designed specifically for the Fujifilm APS-C cameras. This is effectively equivalent to a 50mm standard lens on full-frame, certainly in terms of field of view. Add to that the bonus of a very fast, bright f/1.2 aperture and we have a very interesting proposition.

Manual focusing will not be for everyone, and at f/1.2 it can indeed be a bit tricky to find that exact point of focus. One technique is to focus at open aperture and then close down before shooting, counting off the click stops so that the required aperture can be set without taking the camera from the eye. If on a tripod, then the screen can be used and it is easier to be precise, but slower. In bright light and/or at smaller apertures it may be possible to focus at the taking aperture, but probably not with any accuracy when the light begins to fade.

Apart from the advantage in low light and as an aid to focusing, the widest apertures also have a function that depends upon the basic lens design. Some lenses are designed to be relatively soft wide open and these can be very useful for softer effects with portraiture. At some point, they will crisp up and deliver high levels of sharpness for those who need it. Some lenses aim to be razor-sharp even wide open and these can be a bit cruelly sharp for portraits to appeal to the model. With this lens, the widest apertures are softer and there is some potential there for more flattering portraits. Standard lenses no longer seem to be regarded as too close for flattering images, so this could fit in very nicely with current perceptions.

 

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HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 19

HP’s ZBook lineup — which encompasses the lightweight ZBook Firefly, the affordable ZBook Power, the powerful ZBook Fury, and the best-of-all-worlds ZBook Studio brands — doesn’t attract a lot of attention. As a mobile workstation-class device, the ZBook Studio is not as flashy as most gaming laptops or as affordable as most “creator” laptops, but in many ways, it’s better than both.

In the parlance of the tech nerd, the HP ZBook Studio G8 is a “mobile workstation.” On the hardware side, that typically means that you’re getting a Xeon processor, error-correcting (ECC) RAM, and an A-series or Quadro graphics card, paired with some sort of reliability testing (MIL-SPEC or MIL-STD), software certifications from major developers like Adobe, and an extended warranty. All of this usually comes attached to a price so high you’ll get altitude sickness if you stare at it for too long.

We don’t normally review mobile workstations on PetaPixel because the price increase associated with things like ECC memory and an enterprise GPU doesn’t translate into a measurable performance gain for photo and video editing, but HP did something interesting with the ZBook Studio G8: the company sort of split the difference.

The Studio G8 doesn’t use ECC memory or an Intel Xeon CPU, and it can be configured with a normal GeForce RTX 30-series GPU, but it still comes with all the other workstation perks. In other words: it offers the same performance as a high-end gaming laptop and the same sleek, professional design as a high-end consumer laptop, with better build quality, guaranteed reliability, and a longer warranty than either of the other categories. As a result, it comes in a little cheaper than similar options from, say, the Dell Precision lineup.

That’s not to say it’s cheap. The model HP sent us for review still costs an eye-watering $4,400:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 20

Even if you downgrade some of the components, you’re still going to spend a lot of money. We actually asked the folks at HP to send us “Good, Better, Best” configuration options that they would recommend, and the most affordable of the bunch will still run you almost $2,800:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 21

But that’s not to say that the price isn’t justified, or at least justifiable. From design to usability to raw performance, this laptop is fantastic. It’s just important to set expectations from the get-go: We’re not talking about a budget laptop today. We’re not even talking about a semi-affordable laptop. We’re talking about a mobile workstation that charges a substantial premium in exchange for professional-grade reliability and guaranteed performance.

If paying a $1,000 premium for MIL-STD reliability testing, software certifications, and an extended warranty sounds crazy to you, then a mobile workstation is the wrong choice and there’s no reason to read on. However, if that sounds like a reasonable investment and you like the fact that HP isn’t forcing you to throw additional money away on certain enterprise-grade specs you don’t want or need, then read on, because the HP ZBook Studio G8 turns out to be an excellent laptop for creative professionals.

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 22

Design and Build

There are only a few laptops that can compete with the likes of Apple and Razer when it comes to chassis design, but the HP ZBook Studio G8 is right up there with the best. The magnesium-and-aluminum alloy chassis is as rigid as a tank, extremely thin, and carved into a sharp design language that I loved from the moment I set eyes on this laptop.

Build quality really is top-notch. HP’s workstation-grade “Z” devices all undergo MIL-STD-810 testing, ensuring a level of reliability that surpasses anything you can expect from a standard consumer laptop. The MIL-STD-810 standard includes a suite of tests that check for resistance against vibration, dust, sand, humidity, altitude, drops, temperature shock, and even a “Freeze/Thaw” test.

Adding to the laptop’s reliability quotient is a three-year warranty direct from the manufacturer, a perk that usually costs extra (if it’s available at all) when you buy a consumer laptop.

Crack the ZBook Studio G8 open, and you’ll reveal an excellent keyboard that combines a satisfying click with a good amount of travel, zero mush, and per-key RGB lighting that gives the laptop just a little bit of gaming flare. The lighting is controlled by HP’s “OMEN” dashboard, and it’s a fun touch on an otherwise very professional-looking laptop.

This is accompanied by a slick, glass-topped trackpad that provides a precise and extremely well-optimized experience that can compete with the best-of-the-best. Because the speaker grill is positioned above the keyboard, the trackpad isn’t quite as big as the ones you’ll find on the latest Apple and Dell computers, but it was plenty big enough for me.

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 23

Port selection is solid, with only a little room for improvement. On the left side of the machine is an audio-combo jack, a USB Type-A port, and a Kensington lock; on the right side, you’ll find a sealable SD card slot, a Mini DisplayPort 1.4 port that’s connected directly to the GPU, and two Thunderbolt 4 ports that can carry 40Gbps of data, power, and a display signal.

My gripes are minimal. Mainly, I was annoyed that the Thunderbolt 4 ports are connected directly to the iGPU with no way to re-route that signal in the BIOS (this is according to HP). As a result, anyone using a high-end 4K external display will want to use the Mini DisplayPort for true 10-bit color or high refresh-rate gaming.

For that reason alone, I really wish that HP had included an HDMI 2.1 port in this configuration instead of the MiniDP port. None of the monitors I’ve ever reviewed came with a MiniDP to DP 1.4 cable in the box, wihch forces me to buy a new cable in order to get full performance out of the ASUS ProArt PA32UCG I was using when I reviewed this laptop and eliminates the option of using this as a “single-cable” setup with Thunderbolt providing data, display, and power.

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 24

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 25

Fortunately, the included display is more than good enough to do professional creative work. The model we’re testing includes a touch-enabled 4K AMOLED screen that was able to hit well over 100% sRGB, 99.9% DCI-P3, and 91.6% Adobe RGB with an excellent Delta E of less than 2 and a maximum brightness of ~400 nits.

If OLED isn’t your thing, the ZBook Studio G8 is also available with a 4K 120Hz “HP DreamColor” LCD display with an advertised peak brightness of 600 nits and 100% coverage of DCI-P3, or an even more affordable Full HD model that promises 100% coverage of sRGB.

It’s nice to see a manufacturer offer both a 4K LCD and a 4K OLED option with identical gamut coverage, as well as a more affordable (but still acceptable) Full HD option. If you’re sold on the peace of mind of a mobile workstation but hate the price tag it carries, the lower-end screen option opens the door to get creative with your configuration, especially if you plan to use an external display much of the time.

As for our 4K OLED unit, you can see the results from our DisplayCAL tests below:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 26

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 27
The HP ZBook G8 covers 99.9% of DCI-P3 (left) and well over 100% of sRGB (right).

If there’s a big downside to the high-res screen on our model it’s probably battery performance, which is decidedly middle of the road.

As with other high-performance notebooks, the ZBook Studio’s 83WHr battery can’t support the computer’s full 110W TDP (30W to the CPU, 80W to the GPU), and when you’re pushing the computer to its battery-powered performance limit, you can expect no more than about two hours of intense photo editing. In a more reasonable, battery saver or balanced mode, I was able to get about six hours of use for writing, occasional content consumption, and light photo editing, but don’t expect this laptop to compete with something that’s powered by AMD.

Overall, I found a lot to love and very little to complain about when it comes to the design and build quality of the ZBook Studio G8. It’s an excellent laptop that felt like a little piece of military equipment with just enough design flare. The excellent keyboard and trackpad, the professional-grade display, and the dual Thunderbolt 4 ports all make it a solid contender for serious creative work.

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 28

Photo Editing Performance

Given the extremely thin design, I was skeptical that the HP would be able to squeeze every ounce of performance out of its Core i9-11950H and NVIDIA RTX 3070. I was only kind of right. In most of our benchmarks, the ZBook couldn’t quite out-perform the latest Razer Blade 15 Advanced, which technically uses an ever-so-slightly slower Core i9-11900H, but the thinner ZBook Studio was still able to churn out top-shelf performance numbers.

Whether you’re running Photoshop, Lightroom, or Capture One, you can expect the Studio G8 to fly through most photo and video editing tasks with ease, all while staying remarkably quiet compared to some of the gaming laptops I’ve tested.

For our comparisons today, we’re showing the results from the HP side-by-side with the same tests run on an M1 iMac, an AMD-powered ASUS Zephyrus G14, and the aforementioned Blade 15 Advanced. Full specs below:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 29

Lightroom Classic

In our standard import and export tests, the ZBook clocked in a tiny bit slower than the Razer Blade, but faster than our other test machines. As a reminder, these tests consist of importing 110 61-megapixel Sony a7R IV and 150 100-megapixel PhaseOne XF RAW files, generating 1:1 (Lightroom Classic) or 2560px (Capture One Pro) previews, applying a custom-made preset with heavy global edits, and then exporting those same files as 100% JPEGs and 16-bit TIFFs.

You can see the results for Lightroom Classic below:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 30

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 31

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 32

Capture One Pro

The story is even better in Capture One, where the computer’s RTX 3070 finally gets to flex its muscle.

As we’ve mentioned in several of our past reviews, Lightroom does not use any sort of GPU acceleration during import or export, relying exclusively on the performance of your CPU and RAM to generate the numbers you see above. However, Capture One does take advantage of the GPU, so when it comes time to export the heavily-edited Sony a7R IV and Phase One XF variants in C1, the HP ZBook Studio G8 was able to close the gap with the Blade and trade blows at the top of the pack.

The results are essentially a wash between the three PCs, all of which benefit from NVIDIA RTX 30 series GPUs, with the M1 iMac falling way behind:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 33

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 34

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 35

Photoshop

Finally, we ran our usual Photoshop test: Puget Systems‘ industry-standard PugetBench benchmark.

PugetBench assigns an Overall and four Category scores after timing a wide variety of tasks including basic stuff like loading, saving, and resizing a large .psd, GPU-accelerated filters like Smart Sharpen and Field Blur, and heavily RAM-dependent tasks like Photo Merge. As we have in the past, we ran version 0.8 of this particular benchmark, because it was the last version to include a Photo Merge test.

As you can see, the powerful GPU, 32GB of 3200MHz RAM, and the NVIDIA RTX 3070 GPU come together to put up impressive numbers in every category tested:

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 36

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 37

Performance Takeaways

There’s no questioning the HP ZBook Studio G8’s performance chops. Is it the most powerful laptop money can buy? Definitely not. HP’s own ZBook Fury lineup, the Alienware x17, and the Lenovo Legion 7i (to name a few) can all be configured with more powerful (and power-hungry) CPU/GPU combinations that would no-doubt outperform the ZBook Studio. However, it’s awesome to see this kind of performance across the board from such a thin device.

This is seriously impressive photo editing performance packed inside of a chassis that’s thinner than we previously thought possible for an Intel-based workstation.

HP ZBook Studio G8 Review: Rock Solid Performance, Painful Price Tag 38

Excellent Design, Great Performance, Painful Price Tag

If you can stomach the price, the HP ZBook Studio G8 is a phenomenal laptop for photo and video editors who want great performance paired with guaranteed reliability. That latter point really matters to working pros, who often opt for high-end gaming laptops with less-than-ideal build quality and lower-quality displays in order to achieve this kind of performance.

However, even when you understand the benefits, the Studio G8’s price is really hard to swallow. The variant I tested here costs about $1,000 more than you would spend on an (already expensive) Razer Blade 15 Advanced with basically the same core specs, a more powerful GPU, faster PCIe Gen 4 storage, and a next-gen OLED display that covers 100% of both DCI-P3 and AdobeRGB.

You really have to value those un-sexy mobile workstation perks if you’re going to justify that kind of price hike.

Pros

  • Excellent performance
  • Thin, light, rugged design
  • Fantastic trackpad and keyboard
  • Multiple color-accurate display options
  • Solid port selection with two Thunderbolt 4 ports and an SD card slot
  • MIL-STD-810 tested
  • 3-year warranty included

Cons

  • No HDMI port
  • SSD is PCIe 3.0, not 4.0
  • RAM is not upgradable
  • Sky high price

I hate to spend so much time addressing a computer’s price since a lot more goes into judging the real-world value of a computer than the cost of its components, so in most cases, I’ll focus on performance and usability and leave the economic calculus to individual readers who have individual budgets and don’t give an individual damn whether I think a laptop is “reasonably priced.”

However, “mobile workstations” like the ZBook Studio G8 exist in a different economic reality, and it’s important to understand the benefits and drawbacks of that reality before you either a) spend way too much on a laptop you don’t need, or b) ignore features and benefits that could make the laptop worth every last penny.

For me, a well-built consumer laptop is reliable enough. I simply don’t use my computers hard enough to justify the price jump and there are some really fantastic options out there. But if you’re a professional photographer or video editor who needs a well-rounded, rock-solid machine that will go with you everywhere for the next three to five years, the HP ZBook Studio G8 is worth a very close look. It’s cheaper than many of its direct competitors in the workstation-class, gives you a wider variety of configurations to choose from, and it churns out better performance than we expected from something so sleek.

Are There Alternatives?

Several major laptop makers have a workstation brand that offers similar benefits to the ZBook Studio. The most popular are probably Lenovo’s ThinkPads and Dell’s Precision lineup. As I mentioned earlier, these laptops usually swap NVIDIA’s GeForce graphics for a mobile Quadro or A-series GPU, sometimes they use error-correcting “ECC” RAM, and often they include longer warranties, the aforementioned military-grade certifications, and displays that put an emphasis on color and/or battery life over speed and/or gaming performance.

For photographers, we’d recommend avoiding anything with ECC memory, an Intel Xeon processor, or an A-series/Quadro card, simply because these upgrades tend to increase the price significantly without adding much to real-world photo and even video editing performance. An 11th-gen Core i7 or Core i9 CPU, DDR4 RAM and a GeForce RTX 30 series GPU is just fine. Instead, if you’re interested in a mobile workstation, focus more on features like a solid manufacturer warranty, standardized reliability testing, and a killer LCD or OLED display with close-to-100% coverage of either AdobeRGB or DCI-P3.

Many of HP’s ZBook-branded laptops, Dell’s Precision laptops, and several of Lenovo’s ThinkPad models trade blows here in a variety of price brackets and configurations, depending on the kind of CPU, GPU, and display performance you need.

If you’re not interested in a mobile workstation, you can find similar performance and solid build quality for a lot less money by purchasing a high-quality consumer or gaming laptop like the Dell XPS 15/17, the Razer Blade 15 Advanced and Razer Blade 17, or the ASUS Zephyrus G14/G15 (just to name a few). You’ll get a lot more performance-bang-for-your-buck by going with a “consumer” or “creator” laptop vs a proper “mobile workstation,” just be aware of what you’re giving up.

Should You Buy It

Yes.

The caveats above apply, but other than a few minor gripes that I mention above, I cannot fault this laptop. For creatives, it’s a workhorse. The ZBook Studio G8 delivered a lot more “umph” than I expected from such a thin and light chassis while staying relatively quiet, it looks and feels great, and it offers a good variety of configuration options that help you dial in a ratio of price-to-performance that works for you.

It’s ultimately up to you to decide if the un-glamorous benefits of a mobile workstation are worth the inflated price tag. But if they are, then I have no qualms recommending this laptop.

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Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod Review

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod Review

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

Quick Verdict

The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod has really impressed us. Not only is it a tripod for photographers, but it’s also a support vloggers and smartphoneographers will love to use, too. 

+ Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Compact 
  • Bluetooth remote trigger
  • Great build quality
  • Quick set-up
  • Smartphone connector included
  • Leg converts to a monopod
  • A quick-release plate that fits smartphones
  • Removable telescopic panhandle
  • Smooth operation

– Cons

  • We’ll let you know if we think of any! 

 

The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod is a travel tripod with a difference because, as well as using it the traditional way with a mirrorless camera or DSLR,  it can also be used for vlogging/video with a smartphone/camera as it comes with a clever quick release plate that’s been adapted for use with smartphones. The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP is priced at £269.99 and we’ve been putting it to the test to find out how versatile it really is and if it’s worth the cash. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod Features

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod has been designed with the traditional style of photographer in mind along with smartphoneographers who want to shoot video or long exposure shots with their devices. It’s also perfect for vloggers who want to shoot photos or videos with either a digital camera or a smartphone. Why? Well, alongside all of the usual features we expect to see on a Vanguard tripod, the VEO 3T 265HCBP features a quick-release plate that can fit any smartphone up to 85mm wide, a removable panhandle that helps with smooth panning. 

As well as using it as a tripod, the Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP transforms into a monopod and it’s constructed from carbon fibre so it’s lightweight, weighing just under 2KG. It’s also compact, measuring 44cm when folded so it easily fits in its supplied tripod bag on even into a backpack. 

Other features include a full-height extension of 166cm, 12KG payload, a Bluetooth remote control so you can use the centre column/monopod when vlogging, easy clean leg locks, optional spikes, a VEO BP-120T Arca compatible ball head and a low angle/macro shooting option. 

Key Features

  • 5-section carbon fibre travel tripod
  • Folded length 44cm
  • Max height of 166cm
  • 12Kg load capacity
  • Weighs 1.9kg
  • VEO BP-120T Arca compatible ball head
  • Separate pan lock
  • Quick-release plate that can hold a smartphone up to 85mm wide
  • A leg that converts to a monopod
  • Easy to clean twist locks
  • Includes a Bluetooth remote control for IOS or Android
  • Low angle/macro shooting with reversible centre column, or using the Low Angle Adaptor included
  • 3-easy set leg angles
  • Hook at base of the central column
  • Rubber or Spiked Feet
  • Tripod Bag

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod Handling & Performance

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod

 

The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP is a carbon fibre travel tripod and as it folds down to 44cm and weighs just under 2KG, it certainly fits the requirements of a travel tripod that needs to be lightweight and compact. It easily attaches to a backpack and will fit in a carry-on bag or you can store/carry it in its supplied carry bag.

Another bonus of the Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP is that it transforms into a monopod so you get two pieces of kit in one which means you have less to pack. It’s also really easy to set up and is ideal for days you don’t want to carry a full tripod around or when you’re visiting locations where tripods will simply take up too much room (or aren’t allowed). Plus, when you combine the centre column/monopod with the supplied Bluetooth remote control, it makes an ideal tool for vloggers who may want to capture footage and/or shoot pieces to camera while on the move. It also means that you can set your smartphone (or camera with Bluetooth) up and actually be in photos with your family rather than behind the camera taking photos.

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

 The max height the tripod can be extended to is 166cm which is fine for most situations and it has a 12KG max payload which with most camera/lens combos only weighing around 2KG (for most people), weight will not be an issue and neither is stability as even at full height, the tripod stood firm. If you do find you need to add weight for more stability, there’s a hook you can hang your camera bag to. When you do need more height, release the 5-section legs top-down as the larger parts of the legs will always give more stability. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

To release the leg sections, you use the twist locks which are billed as ‘easy clean’ which is great as when you’re back from the beach, you want to make sure all of the sand and seawater is removed from it. The leg locks are also rubberised which makes them really grippy and easy to turn. Plus, Vanguard has put text on them so you know which way locks and unlocks which is a really simple but useful thing. When you do lock them in place, the legs stay put with no slippage and accidental rotation which is all you can ask for from a good tripod. 

At the top of each leg is a lock you can press to adjust the leg angle via a push-button that’s easy to operate and ensures the legs stay in place once an angle is selected. Simply, push and adjust the leg to 20, 50 or 80-degrees. 

For those who enjoy macro photography, the central column can be easily reversed or you can lower the tripod using the low angle adaptor feature when you’re photographing things closer to the ground but don’t need to be so close that you need to turn the column upside down. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

The included VEO BP-120T Arca compatible ball head operates smoothly and if you’re going to be doing lots of panning of capturing video footage then we do recommend attaching the optional panhandle as it makes panning that bit more effortless and allows for greater control. It’s easy to attach and it’s an excellent addition, particularly the fact that it can be removed so the tripod is easier to store. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

The panhandle was also useful when using a smartphone with the Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP which you can attach to the tripod via the QS-72T Arca compatible 70mm long quick release plate that has a built-in smartphone adapter that is compatible with smartphones that measure up to 85mm in width. The adapter lifts easily from the quick release plate and the support extends to fit your smartphone securely.

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

It’s a piece of kit we didn’t think we’d need until we actually used it and we think it’s a genius move on Vanguard’s part as you might not think you need a tripod when capturing images with a smartphone but with more people than ever vlogging, creating content for YouTube and shooting paid-for photos for Instagram, a good support for your smart device is more important than ever. Plus, the fact that you can fold the adapter back into the quick release plate and then attach your DSLR or Mirrorless camera is great and just brilliantly efficient. The QS-72T Arca compatible quick release plate also allows for longer lenses to be used more easily. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

If you’re someone who’ll need a microphone, lights etc. on your shoot, you can attach additional support arms to the tripod via one of the 3/8″ threads found on the canopy or via the 1/4″ thread on the side of the Universal Smartphone Connector. 

Other features include a choice of Rubber or Anti-Rust Stainless-Steel Spiked Feet that allow for maximum stability on various terrain. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod

 

Overall, the whole tripod is built extremely well with Vanguard really thinking about what the modern-day photographer might need to make their photo-taking process more efficient and straightforward. Plus, it’s ergonomic, too, with grippy and large knobs, easy-to-use twist locks and legs that adjust with the simple click of a button. You also get a separate pan-lock for when shooting panoramas and there’s a spirit level to help keeps things straight. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod
 

Value For Money

The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod has an RRP of £270 which, for some, might seem like a lot of money to spend on a tripod but it is on par with other tripods out there. You also have to remember that it will probably be a one-time purchase that’ll last you years so use vs pounds spent is worthwhile. 

Alternatives from Vanguard include the VEO 3GO Series which are designed to be small/portable and we really liked the VEO 3GO 235CB when we put it to the test, awarding it a ‘Highly Recommended’ accolade. Or, you could look at the VEO 3GO 265HCB which is lighter and shorter when folded but not as versatile. it does come with a smartphone adapter but it’s not built into the quick release plate as it is on the VEO 3T 265HCBP. 

Options from other manufactures include the Manfrotto Befree range with the MKBFRC4-BH at £300, the Benro Travel Angel FTA28CV1 priced at £300 and the 3 Legged Thing Albert 2.0 with AirHed pro kit (not just tripod) at £350, or Punks Brian System at £270. All of these tripods are designed to be compact, lightweight and stable but they don’t offer the same flexibility for smartphoneographers and bloggers quite like the Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP does. 

For more options, we have a couple of tripod round-ups that are worth a peruse: ‘Best Tripods You Can Buy Right Now‘ top list and ‘Best Budget Tripod‘ recommendations. 

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Carbon Fibre Travel Tripod Verdict

The Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP has impressed us that much, we’re not messing around, we’re instantly awarding it an ‘Editor’s Choice’ accolade. 

Not only do you get a carbon fibre travel tripod, but you also get a monopod, an Arca compatible ball-head that can include a removable panhandle and a quick-release plate that can fit any smartphone up to 85mm wide. The flexibility the tripod offers photographers/vloggers/smartphoneographers is excellent with the ability to capture both video and still photos with either a camera or smartphone. Plus, it comes with a Bluetooth trigger and the panhandle you can attach to the tripod makes panning smooth and efficient. Set-up is quick, the tripod is really sturdy in use and once you’re done with it you can fold it back down to its compact state so it stores easily in its supplied carry case or on the side of a camera bag. 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP – we like you a lot. 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Travel Tripod Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Compact 
  • Bluetooth remote trigger
  • Great build quality
  • Quick set-up
  • Smartphone connector included
  • Leg converts to a monopod
  • A quick-release plate that fits smartphones
  • Removable telescopic panhandle
  • Smooth operation

 

Vanguard VEO 3T 265HCBP Travel Tripod Cons

  • We’ll let you know if we think of any! 

Own this product? Let us know what you think of it in the EQDB

Spotted a mistake? Let us know in the EQDB.

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Panasonic S 85mm F/1.8 Lens Review

Panasonic S 85mm F/1.8 Lens Review

Panasonic S 85mm f/1.8 L-Mount
 

We continue to look at some of the full-frame Panasonic Lumix lenses using the Leica L mount, a collaboration between Leica Camera, Panasonic and Sigma. This is the second we have reviewed, the first being the Lumix S 24mm f/1.8, from a set of three lightweight lenses with virtually identical dimensions and balance. This is intended to particularly benefit videographers as the balance of the camera/lens combination will not change from lens to lens. The complete trio of lenses will be 24mm/50mm/85mm. Now it is the turn of the 85mm f/1.8, again coupled with the 24MP full-frame Panasonic Lumix S5 camera body. The 24mm acquitted itself well, so let’s see if the 85mm is up to the same standard.

Panasonic Lumix S 85mm F/1.8 Handling and Features

Panasonic S 85mm f/1.8 L-Mount
 

Thanks to the extensive use of plastics, the lens weighs in at a very modest 355g. It looks well made and has the welcome benefit of being dust and splash resistant, as well as freeze-proof down to -10C.

There is a generously sized round lens hood that securely clips into place. The improved design of the hood release catch is flush with the hood and is therefore unlikely to be accidentally released. Within the bayonet fit for the hood is a standard 67mm filter thread.

There are only two controls on the lens. The wide manual focus ring is electronic in operation and, as expected, extremely smooth. The action is quite firm but has a well-balanced feel to its action. The only other control is the AF/MF switch.

The Leica L mount is metal and retained by six screws, more than most. The lens has five retaining screws for its mount, the implication being that maybe it is a sign of robust construction. It is a solid fit with absolutely no play once the lens is seated. Despite this, there were a couple of occasions where the camera advised that the lens was not seated properly. Remounting the lens cured this.

 

Panasonic S 85mm f/1.8 L-Mount
 

Focusing is down to 0.8m, or 2.62 feet, for a maximum magnification of 0.13x. This is about what we would expect, but nowhere near macro distances. With videography in mind, the design has very low focus breathing, so focusing will not change the magnification or shape of objects in the frame. Also with videography in mind, this lens and its matching siblings the 24mm and 50mm have almost identical dimensions and centres of gravity, so in use, the handling remains the same.

Optical construction is 9 elements in 8 groups, including 2 ED (Extra-Low Dispersion), the aim being to reduce or eliminate chromatic aberrations and distortion. The diaphragm comprises 9 rounded blades for enhanced bokeh. There is no built-in image stabilisation, relying instead on the IBIS of the camera body. For critical sharpness, a benefit of 2.5 stops was achieved. This will of course vary, depending on the individual photographer and the circumstances.

Traditionally, the 85mm is the ideal portrait lens, allowing an approach close enough to the subject so there is good communication, but not so close that features are distorted. 85mm lenses tend to be fast, f/1.8, f/1.4 or even f/1.2, and hence looking at the world through them gives an impressive sense of the slim depth of field that in turn results in fantastic out of focus backgrounds.

There is much more, though, to such lenses, and they are also useful for close sports, landscape, architecture and even some styles of street photography. The Lumix lens is so simple in its facilities that considering its handling is largely irrelevant – it just does the job, simply and effectively, with nothing to interfere with that.

 

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Canon EOS R3 Hands-On Photos

Canon EOS R3 Hands-On Photos

We’ve been getting hands-on with the Canon EOS R3 mirrorless camera at The Photography Show 2021.

| 
Canon EOS R3 in Mirrorless Cameras

97593 1631968140 (1) | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 488
 

Canon has officially announced the EOS R3 and they’re giving those who attend The Photography Show 2021 the chance to get a first look at this new high-speed mirrorless camera.

Stuart Fawcett was given the opportunity to do just that when he visited the Canon stand at The Photography Show 2021 this Saturday just gone where he described the Canon EOS R3 as a ‘beast of a camera for new and sports photography’. 

 

97593 1631968172 | 1/25 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 396
 

EOS R3 Key Features:

  • New Canon-developed 24.1 megapixel back-illuminated stacked CMOS sensor
  • 30fps with AF/AE tracking
  • Shutter speed offering a range of 30 seconds to 1/64000 of a second when using the electronic shutter
  • Eye Control AF point selection
  • AF tracking of people, animals (including birds) and motorsports (racing motorbikes and racing cars)
  • Full width 6K 60p RAW video recorded internally to a CFexpress card
  • Focus in light levels as low as –7.5 EV 

 

97593 1631968199 |
 

On the EOS R3, Stuart says focusing looks good and he likes the flip-out screen, double grip and EVF. The deep grip makes it really easy to get a good hold of and the top small display is handy for when you want to quickly check settings. All dials/buttons fall nicely into place when in use and the tilting display is great for tricky shooting situations. 

Stuart compared it to his trusty EOS 6D, released way back in 2012, and the EOS R3 looks much more substantial and robust, which isn’t a bad thing, and you can tell a lot of thought has gone into its design. 

 

97593 1631968221 | 1/33 sec | f/1.7 | 4.7 mm | ISO 391
 

As well as the Canon EOS R3, the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM and 16mm f/2.8 STM were on display and Stuart says the 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM focuses fast when used with the EOS R3 and images looked good on the LCD – it’s a nice contender. 

 

Canon 16mm f2.8

 

Canon 100-400mm

 

ePHOTOzine will be writing a full review on the Canon EOS R3, 100-400mm and 16mm lenses as soon as we can. For more information on what’s happening at The Photography Show, have a read of Stuart’s blog

 

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