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Adobe Camera Raw Is Coming Soon To Photoshop iPad

Adobe Camera Raw Is Coming Soon To Photoshop iPad

Adobe is giving you a sneak-peek at Adobe Camera Raw which will soon be available to those who use Photoshop on their iPads.

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Adobe Photoshop

 

This morning, Adobe shared a sneak peek of the power of Adobe Camera Raw coming soon to Photoshop on the iPad. 

From DNG to Apple ProRAW, users will be able to import and open camera raw files, make adjustments like exposure and noise, as well as take advantage of non-destructive editing and auto-adjustments in raw files – all on the iPad. You’ll also be able to import into PSD as an ACR Smart Object. 

The news comes after Adobe announced back in August 2021 that the Magic Wand Tool & Healing Brush would be added to Photoshop on the iPad. 

Click ‘play’ on the video above to learn more about the new Camera RAW options. 

 


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Make a Realistic Background in Photoshop in 5 Steps

Photo of background in Photoshop

An effective background can be key to an effective portrait. Sometimes, however, the background where you shoot your portrait will look dull or even distracting.

One solution to this dilemma is to swap in a non-photo background – such as a gradient, an abstract pattern, or a graphic – behind your subject in Photoshop. However, that can produce a background that looks, at best, flat and unrealistic and, at worst, amateurish.

There are things you can do in Photoshop, however, to give any flat background some dimension to make it more realistic while blending it smoothly behind your subject. In the below video tutorial from Photoshop expert Unmesh Dinda of PiXimperfect, he shows you how.

“In this lesson, we will learn several techniques like creating shadows, matching the lighting, adding texture, among many others to create a perfect composite,” Dinda says.

Step #1: Create the Shadows

“To create the shadows, drop shadows not the only way,” Dinda says. “You can also fill in a shape and just create a shadow effect. And that’s what we’re going to do.”

Step #2 Add Texture

“Now this pattern we have here already has some texture, but in case it doesn’t, it really does help when we add some texture on top of it. And the texture should match the lighting conditions.”

Step #3: Match the Background

“Now it’s time for us to match the new background with that of the subject. And, of course, as usual, we’re going to go ahead and start with Curves.”

Step #4: Match the Subject

“And since the background is so colorful, don’t you think that the light would bounce off of the background and hit the subject as well? So, we could see a little bit more color on the subject that is coming from the background.”

Step #5: Add Global Effects

“Moving on to the next and the final step and that is adding global effects. These are the effects that you add both to the background and the subject. They are the effects that bring everything together.”

If you want to follow along in the below video and try Dinda’s technique yourself, you can download his lesson materials for free here. And here’s another great editing tutorial from Dinda on how to sharpen images in Photoshop by blurring them.



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How to Remove a Fence Using Photoshop

How to Remove a Fence Using Photoshop

In certain situations, you may be stuck behind a fence shooting your subject, which can lead to a very distracting grid across your final image. Such a situation is certainly annoying, but luckily, it is something you can fix in post, and this great video tutorial will show you how to get rid of the fence using Photoshop.

Coming to you from Anthony Morganti, this helpful video tutorial will show you how to remove a fence from an image using Photoshop. This situation often arises if you are shooting sports or if you visit a place like a zoo, and while it is annoying to deal with, it should not stop you from taking photos, as you can fix the issue in post. Of course, while you can get rid of the fence in Photoshop, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. One trick pro sports photographers use when they are stuck behind a fence is getting as close as possible to the fence and using as wide of an aperture as possible. This will often render the fence completely invisible and save you a fair amount of time in post. Check out the video above for the full rundown from Morganti. 

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How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop

How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop

Want to create a “small world” or “tiny planet” image in which a landscape photo (often a panorama) is turned into what looks like a miniature planet? Here’s an easy-to-follow 2-minute tutorial that will teach you how to make one in Photoshop.

Here are the step-by-step instructions by Adobe Creative Cloud Evangelist Paul Trani on using Photoshop’s Polar Coordinates filter to achieve your desired result.

1. Prepare a Panoramic Photo

First, you’ll need a landscape panoramic photo. The left and right sides of the photo need to be manipulated so that they match up, allowing them to be seamlessly joined together in the final small world.

There are various ways you can go about doing this, but Trani duplicates the photo into a new layer, flips it horizontally, using a layer mask to hide all but one edge of the new flipped photo, and working with the mask to blend the new edge into the original photo.

How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 1
The original panorama Trani found on Adobe Stock.
How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 2
The edited panorama in which the right edge matches the left by flipping a duplicate layer and then masking it.

Once you have the prepared panorama, convert it to a Smart Object.

2. Square, Scrunch, and Flip

Next, make sure your canvas is a perfect square — change the canvas dimensions so that the width matches the height. This will lead to much of the photo being outside the bounds of the canvas.

Do Free Transform (Ctrl+T or CMD+T) to scrunch the photo so that it’s entirely within the new square canvas. You’ll also need to rotate it so that it’s upside down.

How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 3
After changing the canvas into a square, use Free Transform to scrunch the photo into the canvas.
How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 4
After the photo is scrunched and then rotated until upside down.

Use the Polar Coordinates filter found under Filter->Distort. Make sure “Rectangular to Polar” is selected and you’ll see a preview of the small world photo you’re about to create.

How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 5
Use the Polar Coordinates filter.
How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 6
The Polar Coordinates filter panel.

Voila! You’ve made a small world photo!

How to Create a Small World Photo in Photoshop 7
The small world photo that results.

The video tutorial is part of Adobe’s #PHOMO series on YouTube, which features Photoshop editing tips and tricks in short bite-sized videos.

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How to Use the New Photoshop Sky Replacement Features

How to Use the New Photoshop Sky Replacement Features

Earlier this month, Adobe updated the sky replacement features in Photoshop CC. This feature can make an image pop or make it look over-processed and fake. Make sure you know how to get the best out of this powerful Photoshop feature and create strong, realistic images.

Photoshop recently updated its sky replacement features. In this video, PiXimperfect take a look at a few new features and explores the sky packs provided with this update. There are also great tips on how to match skies better and a comparison between Photoshop’s sky replacement and Luminar’s.

Adobe keeps cramming new features into their Creative Cloud suite of software; there are so many powerful features, which can be intimidating to beginners. In his usual style, PiXimperfect breaks down how to use the sky replacement features, how to add new skies, and tips on how to create realistic reflections so your image looks more realistic.

Photoshop has become a fundamental part of modern photography. Whether you love it or hate it, the lines between retouching, enhancing, and creating digital art have become blurred.

Have you used the new sky replacement features? Do you think this type of retouching is too much or simply another way to enhance your images? Let me know in the comments.

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Nik Collection 4.2 Update: Optimises Experience For Adobe Photoshop Users On Mac M1

Nik Collection 4.2 Update: Optimises Experience For Adobe Photoshop Users On Mac M1

The Nik Collection

 

The Nik Collection by DxO has had an update which means it can be used with Adobe Photoshop CC in native mode on Apple computers with an M1 processor and users will notice it is more responsive when using the Nik Silver Efex.

Nik Collection 4.2 (Windows and macOS) is now available for download from the DxO website for a special price of £88.99 instead of £133 and £54.99 instead of £69 for the upgrade until 10 October 2021. Photographers who own Nik Collection 3 or later can purchase an upgrade by signing into their accounts. A full, one-month trial version of Nik Collection 4 is also available on the DxO website.

More information on the update can be found from DxO below. 

 

From DxO: 

Nik Collection, which sets the standard for creative photography, combines 250 professional-quality presets with the exceptional flexibility of U Point™ local adjustment technology. Its eight software plugins address every aspect of creative photography, including colour and HDR photography, black-and-white conversion, and analogue simulation.

 

“Native M1” Adobe Photoshop compatibility

Nik Collection 4.2 can be used with Adobe Photoshop CC in native mode on Apple computers with a M1 processor (version 22.3 and up).

“Users of Photoshop 22.3 (and later) working on a Mac M1 can run it in ‘native’ mode or with the Rosetta emulator. Up until now, they had to use Rosetta to be able to run Nik Collection.” recalls Jean-Marc Alexia, Vice President Product Strategy. “With the 4.2 version of Nik Collection, users can now opt to run the software in ‘M1 native’ mode and enjoy an optimized user experience”

Nik Collection 4.2 also makes Nik Silver Efex and Nik Viveza compatible with the latest version of Capture One.

 

Improved responsiveness for Nik Silver Efex

The Nik Collection’s flagship software plugin, Nik Silver Efex, features a range of exclusive presets and effects designed to simulate classic analogue films, including Kodak Tri-X 400, Ilford Delta 100, Fuji Neopan, and more. Its range of customized presets lets users vary the grain structure and contrast characteristics of their photos to accurately reproduce some of the most iconic black-and-white films in the world.

With Nik Collection 4.2, Nik Silver Efex has once again improved its U Point technology. Control Points, which make it possible to locally adjust contrast, edit brightness, and structure specific areas in the image with infinite precision, have become even more responsive. The photographer’s workflow has become even faster.

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Four Methods for Replacing a Sky in Photoshop

Four Methods for Replacing a Sky in Photoshop

Replacing a sky is one of the most common and useful skills a Photoshop user can have, and there are several ways to go about it. If you are beginning to learn the technique, this awesome video tutorial will show you four different ways to go about it using Photoshop. 

Coming to you from Milky Way Mike, this great video tutorial will show you four different ways to replace a sky using Photoshop. While this video is geared toward astrophotography, sky replacement is a technique that has uses in many genres, including landscape work, weddings, real estate, and more. It can be a bit of a controversial thing, but I think it is a very useful tool, particularly in situations in which second chances or shooting another day are not an option. When it comes to astrophotography, it can be especially useful, as if you want to get a particularly good exposure of the sky, you will have to use an equatorial mount to cancel out the rotation of the earth, but then, you will blur the ground if you do not take a separate exposure without the mount moving. Check out the video above for the full rundown. 

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A Quick Way to Fix Color in Images in Photoshop

Photo for color correction trick in Photoshop

One the most surefire ways to get accurate color in your images is to use a gray card. But, from time-to-time, you’ll leave your gray card at home or simply forget to take a picture of it during a photo shoot.

What do you now?

Photographer and author Glyn Dewis shares a “quick fix” for color correcting images in Photoshop in the below tutorial. The best part? No gray card is necessary.

In the 3-minute video at the bottom of this post, Dewis walks you through his super-fast technique for removing color casts in images. Even better, the process can be recorded as an Action in Photoshop so you can fix thousands of photos with just one click.

Step 1: Choose Levels or Curves

After you open an image, choose Levels or Curves in the adjustment layer section in the top right of your screen. Either adjustment will work for this quick fix because they both have an Auto button, Dewis explains.

Step 2: Select Auto Color Correction

“Now I’m going to hold down the Option key on Mac or Alt key on Windows and click directly on that Auto button,” he says. “When I do that, it brings up the Auto Color Correction Options.”

Choose the third option, Find Dark & Light Colors, and tick the box to turn it on.

“What that is doing is telling Photoshop to look at the image and find the darkest part and make it black, and the lightest part and make it white. We can also take it a step further by turning on this Snap Neutral Midtones section.”

The image should now be color corrected.

Step 3: Make It an Action

“If we want to use this now as a very quick way of color correcting lots of images in the future, we can save this as a default. So, in the bottom we have a check box, put a little tick in there and then click ok.”

So, going forward, if you have other images that you want to color correct, all you need to do is go to Levels or Curves and click Auto and the quick color fix will be applied. If, in the future, you want to change what the Auto button does, just hold down the Option key on Mac or Alt key on Windows, click on Auto and then change the editing options as you’d like.

Watch the video below where Dewis shows you the process.



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Hidden Algorithms in Adobe Photoshop for Easy Color Correction

Hidden Algorithms in Adobe Photoshop for Easy Color Correction

It doesn’t matter for how long you have used Adobe Photoshop, there is always more you can learn. In this video, learn some lesser-known functions hidden away in menus for working on the colors of your images.

I have discussed the depth of Photoshop a few times and it never fails to regularly remind me just how deep it is. I started learning Photoshop about 18 years ago and I remember thinking that there was so much to the software that it was borderline unmasterable. Then, as these learning curves tend to go, I started to build up an arsenal of techniques and tools and felt as if I was getting rather good at it. Finally, when you actually are rather good at it, you realize how much you don’t know.

All of these years later and I still feel the same way. In fact, I’m arguably worse because I rarely seek out new techniques anymore. I have all the tools I need to complete the work I do to the standard I want, and there are rarely situations in which I look at an image and think that it could be significantly improved by someone better at Photoshop than I am. This is a limiting way to work, particularly with software as fast-changing as Photoshop.

In this video, Photoshop Training Channel walks you through some automated tools that are a little hidden away. A few of these techniques I was aware of, but the first example I had absolutely no idea it existed.

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How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop

How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop

Often caused by polarizer filters, lens vignetting, or side-lit scenes, gradients can be a pain to handle in post-processing. Follow these simple steps in Photoshop to gain control over gradients commonly found in blue sky images.

Before we begin, it’s important to note that not all gradients are bad, as they can often enhance an otherwise dull image. The human eye enjoys the smooth tonal transitions that gradients provide. Some gradients can really detract from an image, however. A classic example is using a polarizer when facing 90 degrees from the direction of the sun (north or south, roughly speaking). Ultra-wide lenses with heavy vignetting can also cause unwanted gradients in your sky. Regardless of the cause, these simple steps in Photoshop will help you gain control of unwanted gradients. 

Step 1: Copy the Background Layer

With your background layer selected, use Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V (Cmd+C and Cmd+V for Mac users) to make a copy and rename the layer “Fix Gradient”. 

How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop 8

Step 2: Select the Sky

Using the Sky Selection command which is built into Photoshop (Select > Sky). You should see “marching ants” appear around the border of the sky. Add the sky selection as a layer mask using the “Add Layer Mask” button at the bottom of the Layers panel. Sky Selection is used here only for convenience, and can often result in haloing at the horizon line or bleeding into the foreground. For a more precise selection, use the Quick Selection tool and refine the horizon using Select and Mask’s “Refine Edge” brush. This is especially important if you want to print your images large. Taking the time to make precise edge selections is something many Photoshop users generally shy away from, I believe to the detriment of the final image. Get in the habit of making great selections  

How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop 9

Step 3: Invert the Sky 

Click on the image thumbnail for the “Fix Gradient” layer to make the pixel layer active and use Ctrl-I (Cmd+I for Mac users) to invert the image. It should look quite strange. In my example image, I also need to select and invert the reflection in the puddle. 

How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop 10

Step 4: Change Blend Mode & Opacity

Change the blend mode of the sky layer to Luminosity. This will ignore the inverted colors and only show the inverted luminosity of the gradient. Finally, adjust the opacity of the layer to increase or reduce the effect. Note that increasing the opacity above 50% will effectively begin to reverse the gradient, which is not what we want here. At 50%, all of the pixels in the sky will be the same brightness, canceling out the gradient entirely. I generally prefer to keep some of the gradient to retain a natural look, and for the final image below I used an opacity of 30%. 

How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop 11

How to Easily Fix Blue Sky Gradients in Photoshop 12

The gradient in this image wasn’t terrible to start with, and similar results may have been achieved using simple slider adjustments in Lightroom. However, images with trickier gradients caused by polarizing filters or vignetting can be saved using this method. It is a nice tool to have in your back pocket should the need arise. 

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