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How to Pick the Right Wedding Photographer: 7 Tips You Should Know

How to Pick the Right Wedding Photographer: 7 Tips You Should Know

If you’re looking into hiring a wedding photographer, you may not have much experience with the profession. Although you can pick photographers you like, there is more to the story than just that. So, how can you make sure you’re hiring the right photographer? Here are seven tips that can help ensure you aren’t disappointed.

As we moved out of lockdown in the U.K and event regulations were lifted, I started to get a lot more messages from friends and acquaintances about photography. The bulk of these enquiries were asking for my advice on wedding photographers, which is a tricky topic to approach. For the most part, I’m hesitant to recommend anyone I don’t know, but they aren’t usually asking for me to decide for them, rather help them make an informed decision. For example, how do they know which photographers will be good? How do they know which ones will not let them down? Is the photographer charging a fair price? While these questions apply to wedding photography, they apply to more or less all types of photography that involve the hiring of a photographer. So, here are some of the tips I offer to anyone asking for advice on the hiring of a wedding photographer.

This won’t be an exhaustive list, so if you have any tips you can share to help people, please leave them in the comment section below.

1. Ask for Full Galleries

When I am sent links to other photographers to review, I give the usual cursory glance at the quality of the first shots they show. This is typically an indication of their ceiling or best work to date, and while interesting, it’s seldom useful. Instead, what you must assess is the photographer’s consistency. That is, what is their average?

The best way to tell this is to ask for a couple of full, delivered galleries. In these galleries you want to look for key shots, the quality of most shots, any areas the photographer excels or is lackluster, and ask yourself whether you would be happy with this standard of results. With wedding photographers, if you can find a gallery at the same venue as you have booked for your wedding, this is a major bonus as the photographer will know good locations and the lay of the land.

2. Testimonials and Reviews

Testimonials and reviews are important to any business, but when you’re entrusting something so important to someone you don’t know, they can be crucial in ruling candidates in or out. Testimonials are typically cherry-picked, but if there are enough of them and they are verifiable, they can be comforting at least. With reviews, you’ll likely have to do some legwork to find them all, using Google, Facebook pages, and so on. Search for the name they perform their wedding photography under (i.e. Robert K Baggs Wedding Photography — this isn’t a promotion, I don’t shoot weddings anymore!) and see what you can find.

If you do find complaints, do not instantly rule the person out, but rather read and assess it. I am in multiple communities of photographers where legal advice is the premise of the group, and I would say 75% of the requests for help are from photographers who are dealing with a problem couple. There’s something about weddings that brings out the worst in certain people.

3. Meet With Them

I cannot recommend this tip enough. I appreciate it may not always be possible and you will just have to settle for a video call, but where possible, meet the photographer face-to-face. Typically in business, personalities complementing each other is a bonus, but not a requirement. With wedding photography, I would say it’s far closer to a requirement. Not only does the photographer need to put you at ease and make you feel comfortable as you’re having thousands of images taken of you, but you want to be able to have some sort of friendly relationship to give yourself the best chance of great, natural shots.

When I used to get wedding enquiries, I would offer a heavily discounted engagement shoot out at a nice location for a couple of hours. This would tick a number of boxes for us both: it would see if we work well in each other’s company, the couple can see if they like my shots of them, and we can get to know each other without the pressure of the day. If you can do this, I’d certainly recommend it.

How to Pick the Right Wedding Photographer: 7 Tips You Should Know 1

4. Experience With Specifics

This is a lesser-known tip and one that touches a number of other areas on this list, but it’s an important consideration. Once you know your venue and the types of shots you want, you need to find a photographer who can deliver that and at the venue you have chosen. For example, if you’re having a wedding in an old building in the middle of December, a natural light photographer will be — in all likelihood — a disaster. Conversely, if you’re having a late morning wedding on a tropical beach in the summer, somebody who stylizes a lot of their shots with lighting techniques may not have the same impact you had hoped for. The former is far more likely than the latter and if your venue is particularly dimly lit, you are going to want to ensure the photographer you hire can handle it.

5. Style

Now we move onto one of the most obvious considerations, but one that’s crucial nonetheless: style. When you’re choosing a photographer, you must find somebody whose style you enjoy. This sounds as if it needn’t be said, but too often, couples ask a photographer to adopt a different style and that will rarely result in the sort of imagery they are hoping for. Rather, find a photographer who has delivered galleries in line with the style you like. 

There is, of course, no right or wrong style, but as I mentioned in point four, be wary of exceptionally bright and airy styles if you’re getting married in the bleak midwinter; those weddings are beautiful in a different way and you want to match the style of the photographer not only to your tastes but to the style of the wedding, too.

6. Price

One of the most common supplementary questions I get asked after I have given most or all of the above advice is about price. Is this photographer worth the price? Is X a fair amount to pay? Which package should I pay for? There isn’t a great deal of advice that can be given here as value is relative, however, there are some factors to weigh. The biggest red flag for me — and this is a little sad — is when the price is too low. The chances of you hiring a talented and experienced wedding photographer for your full wedding for three figures is dangerously close to zero. However, if someone is expensive, they damn-well better justify that price.

When I am looking at photographers who are above the budget for the person asking me, I’ll focus on a few areas. Presuming they tick all of my other boxes mentioned above, I will then go to more advanced enquiries: do they have exceptional composition? Do they have unique work? Are there packages inclusive of more than the usual? One example of this would be our writer Jason Vinson, who I genuinely believe to be one of the most memorable and unique wedding photographers I have seen. I have no idea how much he charges for his wedding packages, but he ought to be above the average because his results are anything but average.

7. Avoid Friends and Family

I’ve done a lot of weddings for friends and family, despite my better judgment, and I would like to recommend that you avoid it where possible, despite the fact I have no horror stories to share personally. There are so many reasons that it deserves an article of its own, but I’ll summarize: the downsides almost always outweigh the upsides, for both parties. If anything goes wrong it’ll be a disaster as you’re not just a client to the photographer, money becomes an awkward discussion, that person won’t be able to enjoy the day if they’re working, and so on.

Photographers, What Tips Can You Offer?

Most of the articles and guides to hiring wedding photographers are written by wedding planners and wedding blogs, which have their views colored by one side of the relationship. As photographers, we have our views colored by the opposite side, and so, this can be a way to balance out the scales. If you’re a photographer, add your tips in the comment section below to help people Googling the question in the title.

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Photo Challenge: Pick One Colour And Create A Series Of Images

Photo Challenge: Pick One Colour And Create A Series Of Images

Choose one colour and make a photography project out of it that could last a few hours, a day, 1 week or even a year.

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Creative

 

Rose

 

If you’re searching for inspiration for a set of photographs, choose a colour and go out and take a series of pictures of that colour, it can be similar objects or totally different subjects, but the linking colour theme means that they can hang together as a panel. 

 

Themes To Choose

Try writing down a colour and then listing as many things as possible that are of that colour. As a suggestion, try some of the following:

  • Red: Poppies, phone boxes, post boxes, tomatoes, peppers.
  • Yellow: Melons, bananas, daffodils, buttercups.
  • Green: Fruit & vegetables, grass, trees.

Other items (cars, doors, cladding on buildings, bottles etc.) come in a huge variety of colours and can be included in any group. There’s literally nothing that can’t be included.

 

Composition Is Key

When you take a single colour as a subject, you need to ensure that the composition, in terms of shapes, textures and lines to counteract the lack of colour range, so look carefully and spend time composing your images. Also, try going abstract, perhaps using camera movement to take away “reality” and emphasise the “colour”.

 

Work On Several Themes

If it’s something that appeals to you, try having a number of “themes” on the go at once – it’s not something that you have to go out and shoot in a day, but can be built up over weeks or months. The results can be a very powerful set (or sets) of images.

I, for example, spent some time at the coast and walking along the seafront, loved the countless different coloured beach huts; but to photograph a mass of different huts and colours wouldn’t have given as coherent a set of images. Having wandered up and down the promenade, I decided that blue would be a good choice, as there was plenty of variety, with all blue elements and strong blues set against more neutral tones (white).

While working on the blue huts, I still made a point of photographing other colours, which can go in collections of other colours at another time.

 

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Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video

The Asus ZenFone 7 Pro is the Taiwanese manufacturer’s latest flagship smartphone and comes with the same unusual camera concept as its predecessor, the ZenFone 6: instead of two camera modules—one on the front and another on the back—the device features a single module that can rotate to point away from or toward the photographer.

This not only eliminates the requirement for a “camera notch” in the display, but also means that the same camera hardware can be used to capture standard pictures and self-portraits. While  this hardware on the ZenFone 6 consisted of a dual-camera setup, the new model features three individual cameras: a primary camera with a 64 MP Quad-Bayer sensor, a 12 MP ultra-wide with an 16.6 mm focal length, and an 8MP tele that offers an 80 mm focal length (our Selfie tests cover only the primary camera, though). Imaging parameters are modified depending on which direction the camera is pointed.

Other specs include a top-end Qualcomm Snapdragon 865+ chipset, a Super-AMOLED display with FHD+ resolution, and a beefy 5000 mAh battery. Read our full review to find out how the Asus ZenFone 7 Pro fared in our DXOMARK Selfie tests.

Key front camera specifications:

  • Rotating triple-camera
  • Primary 64 MP 1/1.72″ sensor, f/1.8-aperture lens with 26 mm-equivalent focal length, PDAF
  • Ultra-wide: 12 MP 1/2.55″ sensor, f/2.2-aperture lens with 16.6 mm-equivalent focal length, PDAF
  • Tele: 8 MP sensor, f/2.4-aperture lens with 80 mm-equivalent focal length, PDAF
  • 4320p video at 30 frames per second (8K) (tested at 4K/30 fps)
  • Dual-LED flash
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 865+ chipset
Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 2

Shooting a selfie with the Asus ZenFone 7 Pro

About DXOMARK Selfie tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone front camera reviews, DXOMARK engineers capture and evaluate over 1500 test images and more than 2 hours of video both in controlled lab environments and in natural indoor and outdoor scenes, using the camera’s default settings. This article is designed to highlight the most important results of our testing. For more information about the DXOMARK Selfie test protocol, click here. 

Test summary

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 3

101

selfie

Like on its predecessor ZenFone 6, the ZenFone 7 Pro’s unconventional swivel camera setup makes for great selfie performance, and with an overall score of 101, the device manages to land in the number two spot in our DXOMARK Selfie ranking, just behind the Huawei P40 Pro. It’s actually the new top device for Video at 96 points and among the best for Photo at 104.

The new ZenFone gets all the basics right for still images, with good exposure in all light conditions, wide dynamic range, and accurate colors with nice skin tones. The camera’s large image sensor helps capture excellent detail and texture for a front camera. Image noise is very well under control on the subject’s face and only visible in the background of a scene. Our testers also liked the background-blurring bokeh mode, which creates a natural effect, nicely isolating the subject in the front from the rest of the scene.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 4

The Asus ZenFone 7 Pro front camera delivers natural skin tones, good exposure, and a wide dynamic range.

Thanks to the Asus’s autofocus system, subjects at the front are always nicely focused at any shooting distance, from closeup to selfie-stick shooting. This said, while the large image sensor contributes to a good texture/noise tradeoff, it also has a focus-related downside: depth of field is more limited than on cameras with smaller sensors. In practice this means that subjects at the back of a group selfie will be slightly out of focus, as will be monuments or tourist sites in the background of a travel selfie.

Another point of criticism is a slightly unnatural rendering of skin texture. Under close inspection, detail looks a little oversharpened and too contrasty. Some competitors do a better job in this respect, creating a more natural look.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 5
Bokeh simulation creates a natural blur effect with good subject isolation.

As mentioned above, the ZenFone 7 Pro is the new number one for Selfie Video, thanks to excellent texture and detail rendering, and good exposure down to very low light levels, where many other front cameras struggle. Like for still images, the Asus captures natural skin tones and generally nice colors in video mode, and there’s very little image noise visible on faces.

The camera hasn’t really got any glaring weaknesses in terms of video capture, but the limited depth of field produces the same background-blurring effect for video clips as it does for still images, and while the stabilization system works well overall, it could be a bit better at stabilizing walking motion. Overall, though, the Asus ZenFone 7 Pro is a top choice for selfie video capture.



Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, outdoor video

Photo scores explained

With 104 points, the Asus ZenFone 7 Pro achieves the currently third-highest Photo score in our database. It’s on the same level as the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra and only the Huawei P40 Pro and nova 6 5G have higher Photo scores to their name. We calculate the Photo score from results and analyses of tests that examine different aspects of a device’s still-image performance under different lighting conditions. In this section, we’ll take a closer look at these image quality sub-scores, analyzing some aspects of the Asus ZenFone 7 Pro versus its key competition.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 6

Exposure and Contrast

The ZenFone 7 Pro does generally well in this category. Target exposure tends to be accurate in all light conditions down to low light and the camera offers a wide dynamic range, preserving a lot of highlight and shadow detail in difficult HDR scenes. In addition, exposure is usually stable across a series of shots.

In this comparison below, the Asus records slightly brighter skin tones than the competition, capturing an overall very pleasant image. Exposure is good on all three devices, but the ZenFone 7 Pro looks just a touch nicer than the others.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 7

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, pleasantly bright skin tones

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 8

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, good exposure

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 9

Huawei P40 Pro, good exposure

Occasionally exposure on the subject can be a touch low, though, like in this scene below. Overall exposure is good, with good dynamic range, but ideally the ZenFone 7 Pro would render the subject a touch brighter.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 10

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, slightly low subject exposure

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 11

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, good exposure

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 12

Huawei P40 Pro, good exposure

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 13

Color

The ZenFone 7 Pro is capable of producing nice skin tones and overall pleasant colors, especially in bright outdoor light. We’ve seen some slightly unnatural skin tone rendering under indoor illumination and in low light, though. On the plus side, the auto white balance system works correctly and color shading is well controlled in all conditions.

In this image below, the Asus renders the most natural skin tones. The subject’s face is a touch too orange in the S20 Ultra image and the Huawei shot could do with a touch more saturation. In the Asus image, the blue sky could be more blue, though, something that we’ve seen happen in HDR shots quite frequently.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 14

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, natural skin tones

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 15

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, slightly orange skin tones

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 16

Huawei P40 Pro, slightly low saturation

In this shot below, shadows in the skin tones are also a bit too bright, but skin tones are overall rendered accurately. In comparison, the Samsung has quite a noticeable orange/pink cast and the Huawei is also slightly too warm.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 17

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, accurate skin tones

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 18

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, orange/pink cast

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 19

Huawei P40 Pro, slightly orange

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 20

Focus

Thanks to its autofocus system, the ZenFone 7 Pro nails the focus at pretty much all subject distances and in all light conditions, making it a good choice for selfie shooters who are partial to closeup shots or who like to work with a selfie stick or other type of extension.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, focus at 30 cm

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, focus at 55 cm

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 23

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, good sharpness

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, focus at 120 cm

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 25

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, good sharpness

Its good performance is confirmed by the lab measurements plotted in the graph below:

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 26

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, good focus across all subject distances

It’s not all perfect in terms of focus, though. As we mentioned above, the Asus’s swiveling camera unit uses a bigger image sensor than most dedicated selfie cameras, which means the Zenfone 7 Pro has a narrower depth of field than many of its rivals, resulting in slightly blurry backgrounds, including slightly blurry subjects at the back of group shots.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, depth of field

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 28

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, slightly blurred background

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, depth of field

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 30

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, crop, sharp background

Huawei P40 Pro, depth of field

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 32

Huawei P40 Pro, crop, fairly sharp background

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 33

Texture

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 34

Noise

Texture and noise is an area where the ZenFone’s big sensor is a real advantage. The level of recorded detail is good at all shooting distances in bright light and under indoor illumination. Only in low light is some fine detail lost. Noise is well controlled on the subject’s face but is often visible in the background.

On the downside, texture can look a little oversharpened and contrasty under close inspection, which can result in a slightly unnatural-looking rendering.

In the texture comparison graph below, you can see that the Asus is ahead of the competition in bright light but loses some ground in dim indoor lighting conditions. But below 20 lux, texture measurements actually increase again, causing a dip in the curve, because at that point a frame-stacking night mode kicks in by default.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 35

In this image the Asus deals very well with the contrast between skin tones and delivers very good texture. Both the Samsung and Huawei images are visibly softer with less fine detail.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, texture

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 37

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, excellent detail

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, texture

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 39

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, crop, good detail

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 41

Huawei P40 Pro, crop, good detail

In the image below, the Zenfone 7 Pro deals with noise on the face well, but some noise is visible on the background, albeit at a level that most users will probably be able to live with. The Samsung and Huawei images are a touch cleaner, but the difference overall is small.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, noise

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 43

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, some noise in background

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, outdoor detail

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 45

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, crop, well-controlled noise

Huawei P40 Pro, outdoor detail

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 47

Huawei P40 Pro, crop, well-controlled noise

Noise measurements in the lab confirm that the ZenFone 7 Pro controls noise very well across all light levels.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 48
Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 49

Artifacts

Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ 5G

Artifacts is one of the few areas in which the ZenFone 7 Pro’s score is a little lower than direct competitors. This is mainly due to unnatural skin rendering in all conditions. Skin texture looks oversharpened under close inspection, and there’s also some ringing.  We also observed some loss of texture on faces in some low-light images, which is likely caused by the night mode’s multi-frame stacking. Other artifacts include a hue shift in high-contrast conditions and some distortion, but these are comparatively well under control.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, artifacts

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 51

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, unnatural skin rendering

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 52

Flash

In flash mode, the Asus ZenFone 7 Pro makes use of the LED flash on its swiveling camera module and does not have to rely on a display flash like most selfie cameras. As a result, the Asus can achieve good exposures in low ambient light, with natural skin tones and well-controlled vignetting. White balance can be a little unstable in mixed-light situations, though.

With the flash activated, the camera also activates its night mode at light levels below 20 lux, which can result in the same loss of texture on the face as in flash-off shooting.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 53

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, flash with 5 lux lighting

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 54

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, flash with 5 lux lighting

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 55

Huawei P40 Pro, flash with 5 lux lighting

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 56

Bokeh

The Asus ZenFone 7 Pro achieves a good score for bokeh, thanks to an overall pleasing and natural-looking background-blurring effect, along with good subject isolation and decent texture rendering. We’ve noticed some variation in the strength of the bokeh effect across multiple shots, though.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, bokeh in portrait mode

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 58

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, crop, good background segmentation

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, bokeh in portrait mode

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 60

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, crop, good background segmentation

Huawei P40 Pro, bokeh in portrait mode

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 62

Huawei P40 Pro, crop, good background segmentation

Video scores explained

The Asus ZenFone 7 Pro front camera achieves a Video score of 96 points, improving over the Huawei P40 Pro and the Galaxy S20 Ultra by one point and thus taking the top spot in our Selfie Video ranking. Its Video sub-scores are as follows: Exposure (77), Color (87), Focus (68), Texture (95), Noise (82), Artifacts (86), and Stabilization (76).

The Asus is capable of recording 8K video but its sweet spot, where video image quality is best overall, is at 4K/ 30 fps. Exposure on video clips is accurate down to very light levels of approximately 5 lux where it starts dropping off. This chart shows that in terms of low light video exposure the ZenFone 7 Pro is ahead of both the P40 Pro and the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 63

Video exposure comparison

Dynamic range is good as well, but on a similar level as the direct competition. In addition exposure convergence in changing light conditions is not too fast nor too slow and without any stepping, making for smooth adaptation.

Colors are nice when recording in bright outdoor light or in indoor conditions and the Asus is among the best in terms of video texture. Levels of detail are high at all light levels; and even though the measurements at typical indoor light levels seem to give the S20 Ultra a slight edge over the Asus, our perceptual analysis revealed that Asus offers a slightly better level of detail for indoor conditions than its competitors.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 64

Like for still images, noise is generally well controlled on the face but can be visible in the background of the scene. In our lab measurements the ZenFone’s noise levels were very low in bright light but a touch higher than the competition in low light conditions.

Asus ZenFone 7 Pro Selfie review: Top pick for video 65

Artifacts in video mode are generally well under control, but some tone compression can be noticeable in backlit scenes, and like for still images, we have seen hue shifts around clipped areas in blue skies or on skin tones.

The autofocus system works well in video mode, keeping the subject in focus at almost all times. However, the sensor/lens combination’s limited depth of field has the same effect as in photo mode: people in the back of group selfies or tourist sites in the background will be more out of focus than on most direct competitors with a smaller image sensor in the front camera.

For video stabilization, Asus has chosen a similar approach as Huawei on the P40 Pro and Samsung on the S20 Ultra, stabilizing the background of the scene rather than the subject. The system works well and is among the best we have seen. Still, some motion is still visible and there’s also some variation in sharpness between frames. But video stabilization is in line overall with the high-end competition, though.



Asus ZenFone 7 Pro, outdoor video



Asus ZenFone 6, outdoor video



Huawei P40 Pro, outdoor video

Conclusion

The Asus ZenFone 7 Pro’s unique swiveling camera unit means the same sensor and lens are used for capturing rear camera and selfie images. The concept really works out well, with the Asus delivering excellent results in many Selfie test categories, especially texture and exposure for both Photo and Video. The only real downside of using a comparatively large image sensor for selfie capture is a narrow depth of field and therefore slightly blurred backgrounds in holiday or group selfies. Most users will be willing to accept this, though, and overall the ZenFone 7 Pro is an easy recommendation to any selfie shooter, especially vloggers and others who frequently record selfie video clips.

Photo

Pros

  • Generally accurate white balance and nice skin tones
  • Good target exposure and wide dynamic range in most conditions
  • Good detail in most conditions
  • Accurate depth estimation in bokeh mode

Cons

  • Limited depth of field and occasional focus failures
  • Unnatural skin rendering
  • Image noise in the background
  • Occasionally unstable bokeh effect

Video

Pros

  • Nice colors when recording in bright light and indoor conditions
  • Good exposure on faces down to low light
  • Noise on faces well under control in bright light and indoors
  • Good detail and texture/noise tradeoff

Cons

  • Limited depth of field and focus instabilities
  • Stabilization system could be more effective when walking
  • Noise
  • Artifacts, including color quantization, tone compression, and hue shift

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dudler’s latest blog : don’t pick all the flowers…

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Don’t pick all the flowers…

30 Sep 2020 11:16AM  
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Unique : 48

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I know one or two photographers with a very ‘professional’ attitude to any opportunity to take pictures: like Gil Grissom, they work the scene, leaving no opportunity untaken. The idea of not truing something possible is one they recoil from.

Myself, especially working with models, I like to leave one probably-good idea unused – I want a reason to go back again, to finish the job. It seems silly, because my taking a picture won’t prevent someone else coming up with the idea fie minutes later, but it still feels as though – sometimes – I should walk away, leaving a few flowers unplucked.

When this idea came to me yesterday, it was a surprise. I have carried a camera all the time for most of my life, afraid I might miss something. And now I’ve decided that I will deliberately leave something unshot. It’s not the Deer Hunter syndrome, that it’s enough to have the shot in my sights, it’s a recognition that I don’t actually need to do it all.

It was one of those days when all of Creation seems to be arranged for my personal enjoyment: it would be possible to get thoroughly theological here… But the light was so perfect, the shadows just so… Those days don’t happen often. Today, it’s raining purposefully, and I recognise it as my kind of weather.

But there may be a few deliciously dripping flowers, just waiting for me. We’ll see.

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