Posted on Leave a comment

fenfotos’s latest blog : another grey day

292240_1634491364.jpg

Another Grey Day

17 Oct 2021 6:43PM  
Views : 263
Unique : 255

Today was yet another grey day. Not quite so bad as last week, when the rain set in almost as soon as we set off on the walk, and I got no usable photographs at all. I did do a little better this week.

292240_1634491364.jpg

I am still without my Olympus. I am told that it may take a month to repair. So, once again, I am using my Panasonic TZ70, which has made today a real getting to know my equipment day.

I am often quite curious as to why designers make the decisions they do, when the logic of the decision is not at all obvious. For instance, the TZ70 has a ‘Dynamic Monochrome’ mode, which I use for this project. If I use this mode, I have no control over when the flash will fire. I fancied trying daylight flash in the gloom, so tried to set the camera so the flash always fired. This would potentially have made some interesting shots with a highly illuminated foreground against a dark background. I would have thought such a shot was dynamic. But I am denied any such control. Why? The same mode also seems to accentuate the contrast. To get a decent monochrome from a lot of the images I took today, I would definitely need to go back to the raw file and do the conversion myself.

On the plus side, the TZ70 has a tiny sensor ( I believe the crop factor is over 5), which gives great depth of field, which is ideal for macro work. My lead image of a teasel head is a fine example of this.

Perhaps, not surprisingly, given the prevailing lighting conditions, all my successful shots today were made keeping the camera very close to the subject.

292240_1634491423.jpg

This next shot is of some late flowering dandelions. It is the kind of situation that interests me – the different shapes and textures in the undergrowth. Here, the nettles contrast nicely with the grass, while the dandelions themselves provide focus. For someone like me, who is interested in natural history, this is a picture of ecology in action, as the three plants fight it out, each having its own strategy for hogging the light, inhibiting other competing plants, and dealing with marauding herbivores. I have thought of making a false colour image, such as NASA images of a distant planet. I haven’t yet tried though.

292240_1634491481.jpg

This image is also all about differing textures. This field was just a mass of hawkweed (I think). Now late in the season, there are just a few flowers left among the grey feathery seed heads.

292240_1634491510.jpg

When I first set out, I intended to photograph fungi. But it wasn’t until nearly the end of the walk that I found any. I liked this one with a strong contrast in both lightness and texture to the surrounding ivy.

292240_1634491540.jpg

My final image if of an inkcap toadstool. Taking this picture made me really miss the fully articulated screen of my Olympus. Not being able (or willing) to lie down on the boggy ground, this image was made with quite a lot of guess work. This is also a nice illustration of the depth of field with the TZ70, sharpness extends for inches beyond the fungus.

Overall, I feel this has been my most successful foray yet.

Tags:
Monochrome
Inkcap
Dof depth of field
Teasel Head
TZ70

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

topsyrm’s latest blog : 52 for 2021 week 41 ugborough and western beacons

149719_1634458652.jpg

52 for 2021 Week 41 Ugborough and Western Beacons

17 Oct 2021 9:40AM  
Views : 57
Unique : 49

This week joined by Mrs T I went in search of Dartmoor’s southernmost Tor which some say is Ugborough Beacon but Western Beacon is almost as high and is further south. A quick Google finds both “Wikipedia” and “Tors of Dartmoor” listing Western Beacon as the southernmost hill (Wiki) Tor (Tors of Dartmoor). Furthering the confusion is that in the Dartmoor 365 Book by John Hayward he states that Ugborough Beacon is the southernmost Tor and that Western Beacon isn’t formally a Tor (but he does say that it is the southernmost hill) also in the Dartmoor Tors pocket guide by Janet and Ossie Palmer the Gazetteer of Dartmoor Tors only lists Ugborough Beacon. ??

Ugborough Beacon.

149719_1634458652.jpg

Western Beacon.

149719_1634458689.jpg

Our walk started below Western Beacon but I had seen a disused Quarry marked on the map so we went to have a look at that before setting off up Western Beacon. It turned out to be a lot less of a Quarry than I had expected.

149719_1634458720.jpg

On the way to the “Quarry” we passed what appeared to be an old bridge long since disused/derelicted. Had we not got a long hike ahead of us I would have liked to go down to explore it but it will have to wait for another visit.

149719_1634458755.jpg

We had more pressing matters (the beacons) so we went back to the Moor Gate and headed up Western Beacon.

149719_1634458775.jpg

On the way up the first slopes we could see the rather quaint looking Mooraven Village.

149719_1634458802.jpg

Western Beacon itself has been quarried but that isn’t evident from the map.

149719_1634458825.jpg

It also has a rather odd group of rock piles on the Cairn.

149719_1634458851.jpg

149719_1634458871.jpg

149719_1634458885.jpg

Once over Western Beacon we headed for Butterdon Hill which is also further south than Ugborough Beacon and is also known as Black Tor by some.

149719_1634458922.jpg

The Stone Row points the way which takes you past the “Longstone” beside Black Pool (not the seaside town). This view looking back towards Western Beacon.

149719_1634458947.jpg

On Butterdon Hill there is a Trig Point and from that point we could see across to Ugborough Beacon.

149719_1634459428.jpg

But sadly looking to the West we could also see the scar of the Clayworks at Lee Mill.

149719_1634459454.jpg

From here we could see Hangershell Rock, this was not on the original route plan but we decided to go over and have a look.

149719_1634459502.jpg

Once at the Hangershell Rocks we took time out to have lunch in the lee of the rocks.

149719_1634459544.jpg

From our lunch spot we could see across to Tristis Rock which is on my list of sites to visit but not for this trip, it sits on the opposite bank of the River Erme and needs to be approached from that side. Another day.

149719_1634459591.jpg

As we moved away towards Ugborough Beacon looking back we could see all the way to Plymouth Sound.

149719_1634459626.jpg

We made our way towards Ugborough Beacon.

149719_1634459658.jpg

Passing Main Head which is the start of the spring/stream.

149719_1634459682.jpg

Ugborough Beacon isn’t the biggest Tor I have visited but it does have some interesting rock formations.

149719_1634459725.jpg

And some nice views.

149719_1634459755.jpg

I spotted a Kestrel out looking for lunch, I managed to get a shot but I really don’t have the right kit for these kinds of shots (I’m a landscaper not a wildlifer).

149719_1634459778.jpg

Anyway, it was now time to head off back to the car.

149719_1634459804.jpg

On the way back we saw some curious things, this water hole seemed to be a natural drain for the rainwater into the stream below.

149719_1634459829.jpg

We also passed this derelict building, not sure what it used to be though.

149719_1634459860.jpg

Finally we got back to the Moor Gate and the car.

149719_1634459886.jpg

We did see some Ponies on this trip though.

149719_1634459924.jpg

149719_1634459938.jpg

That’s all for this week folks. As always, comments welcome.

Tags:
Dartmoor
Ponies
Landscape and travel
Photowalk
Ugborough Devon

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

sueleonard’s latest blog : i think i’ve found my calling!

sueleonard's latest blog : i think i've found my calling!

Change gear with our partner, MPB

Profile

I think I’ve found my calling!

14 Oct 2021 2:14PM  
Views : 35
Unique : 34

I think I’ve found my calling! Well, at least for this particular time in my life. In the last few months I’ve been engaged in flower photography and loving it. Who would have thought. Here’s just one of my images for you to enjoy.

Beautiful Lily

Tags:
Flowers
Flower
Lily

There are no comments here! Be the first!

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : cragside without

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Change gear with our partner, MPB

Profile

Cragside Without

13 Oct 2021 4:33PM  
Views : 85
Unique : 75

There is a strange phenomenon when Sue and I go on holiday. All roads lead upwards. How it is that we can choose routes that we have to walk up and then find we’re still walking upwards on the way back is one of those mysteries of the universe….well the ideal place to suffer from this is Cragside. Take two thoroughly unfit photographers (I blame Covid19 restrictions) and place them in an environment chosen for its suitability for hydro-electric power then it’s a perfect result, I won’t say exactly wheezing and gasping up the hills, but it was hard work. Now we’re back and hills don’t seem to exist around here, so I assume we are now toned and fit.

So, a few pictures from the outside areas of Cragside, a huge estate, and actually it’s a pretty good day out.

22471_1634139033.jpg

22471_1634139044.jpg

22471_1634139056.jpg

22471_1634139065.jpg

22471_1634139076.jpg

22471_1634139088.jpg

22471_1634139098.jpg

22471_1634139108.jpg

22471_1634139120.jpg

22471_1634139129.jpg

22471_1634139140.jpg

There are no comments here! Be the first!

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

riobom’s latest blog : used equipment

riobom's latest blog : used equipment

Change gear with our partner, MPB

Profile

Used equipment

12 Oct 2021 2:01PM  
Views : 59
Unique : 48

Dear friends, I have a question? Where can I buy used equipment with confidence.
vasxco Riobom

Tags:
used camera equipment

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

acancarter’s latest blog : my first art show!

acancarter's latest blog : 'follow' - making an interactive print

My First Art Show!

12 Oct 2021 5:33PM  
Views : 24
Unique : 19

I’ve just participated in my first Art Show – The South Northants Art Trail Art Trail . This year there were 20 locations, with 51 participating artists (including a few photographers). I’m not sure what the total footfall was, but our location in Blisworth, with 9 of us exhibiting, had around 800 visitors. This wasn’t about making money – it was the opportunity to put together a display and to talk to visitors about my work. I hoped that having artists (as well as photographers) look at the images might give a different perspective.

This Art Trail was a great place to start. The costs were low and the organisation and publicity provided by Mike and Jenny at Vitreus Art in Towcester was brilliant. It was hard work preparing all the images – printing, framing, labelling… as well as making greeting cards using selected images. The event itself was over 10 days and needed nearly full time attention as well as setting up and breaking down. Ready for a good long nap now!

The bottom line was that this was absolutely great. I’d thoroughly recommend having a go at something like this if the opportunity arises. I made friends, bonded with all the other exhibitors, had very interesting and exciting feedback from visitors and had the pleasure of selling some images to people that liked them and wanted them in their homes!

I thought it might be interesting to share a few observations and thoughts on this. For those of you who have looked at my portfolio you will have seen some light painting images made with a photographically recording harmonograph. You can see more images on my gallery. I featured these images on the stand, as they are very unusual and eye catching and don’t really look like photographs. Below is an overview of the stand. I had maybe more than my fair share of space as I promised to bring in and demonstrate the harmonograph. It was quickly termed ‘The Mesmeriser’ by the others!
331023_1634055710.jpg

Having the demonstration on the stand worked extremely well. A typical reaction when I told people ‘these are all photographs’ was ‘What of?’ so I could show them, and most understood instantly what I was doing after seeing the demo; they then explored the images with renewed interest and understanding! Here is a photo of me explaining things…they all seem to be listening.
331023_1634055760.jpg

I tried to keep the prices as low as possible, to make the images more accessible. I’m fortunate to be able to print the images myself as well as to make the frames. These weren’t ‘Gallery’ prices and there was no way I could make a living out of this, but I certainly covered my material useage and made a significant dent in the costs of my next lens!

It was really interesting to watch people deciding on purchase. I may have had a few too many images on display, so making choice harder. I found it difficult to decide what to use and what to leave out. Some people went straight for the image that caught their eye. Some went for the colour images, some the nearer mono ones. Having a few landscape, floral and macro shots gave diversity. The triptych ‘Sing Dance Fly’ was very popular, especially when I treated them to Fabio’s sonification Sonification and told them the story! The ‘interactive’ print ‘Follow’ ‘Follow’ was also very popular, and a real draw with both children and adults – I now have to make a couple more. I tried to keep the frames neutral – they were all waxed or oiled Walnut. Inevitably some would have liked much lighter frames, others very dark. Inevitably a few sales were lost as a result. Maybe I should have had a few alternative frames to show – not to swap out in real time, but to be delivered after the event.

Another great investment (and I have to thank one of the other exhibitors for this) is a tin of sweets on the stand. Went down a treat. Having cards was good too. Another exhibitor suggested I put a few words in with each, and not to obscure this with the envelope when putting it into the sleeve. First thing most people do when selecting a card is to turn it over and read the back!

Good, readable, titles with a few words on each image worked well, giving an ‘in’ to talk about the image and why I had chosen it… but the labels have to be quite large to be readable.

I used a low cost card reader as an alternative to cash for payments – very simple to use, secure and reliable. Mine was from SumUp; I’m sure there are others available.

This was great fun and rewarding overall, and I’d really recommend you have a go if you get the opportunity. As we all say – What is the point of a Photograph if you don’t share it?!

Thanks for taking the time to look at this; I’d be very interested in your thoughts and comments.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : cragside within

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Cragside Within

12 Oct 2021 11:15AM  
Views : 62
Unique : 53

Cragside is an immense National Trust site and considering it includes a 6 mile self drive route around the woodlands that gives us an idea of how big it really is. You might think it’s a long way to the corner shop, but that’s nothing compared to Cragside. We arrived armed with the Pentax K-3 (Sue) and K-3 II (Me) plus 18-135mm lenses. First off, let’s have a look at some interior shots. This is the first house to be powered by hydro-electricity. It’s in an ideal situation for this, very hilly with lots of rushing water power from the vigorous streams and rivers.

Inside these houses can be tricky as they are quite dark, but be not of faint heart, the ISO on modern cameras can be hiked up quite a way, plus the SR (Shake Reduction) makes those slow shutter speeds manageable. It was in Cragside that I was asked if I was a member of the aristocracy! I guess that regal countenance and fine profile meant something after all. Sue explained “Fat, well fed and a derby tweed jacket did it”, thus deflating the whole moment back to the mundane. Ah well…..

22471_1634033491.jpg

22471_1634033517.jpg

22471_1634033530.jpg

22471_1634033540.jpg

22471_1634033549.jpg

22471_1634033558.jpg

22471_1634033571.jpg

22471_1634033580.jpg

22471_1634033590.jpg

22471_1634033609.jpg

22471_1634033617.jpg

22471_1634033628.jpg

22471_1634033637.jpg

22471_1634033651.jpg

22471_1634033661.jpg

22471_1634033674.jpg

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

dark_lord’s latest blog : diffraction ? the enemy of sharpness

18034_1633984326.jpg

Diffraction – the Enemy of Sharpness

11 Oct 2021 9:41PM  
Views : 83
Unique : 74

Using small apertures is good for obtaining large depth of field, but go too small and image quality worsens. How bad is the effect and is it worth being concerned about?

Let’s take a look at what diffraction is. I recall physics experiments at school creating waves in a water tank passing through various sized slits in a metal barrier and observing the patterns produced. The waves spread out from the slit, more so the smaller the slit. The observation applies to water waves, sound waves and electromagnetic radiation. It’s this spreading that causes the softening in an image.

During my experiments with depth of field, looking closely, that is at 100% on screen, there is a noticeable softness at smaller apertures. It’s not a lot, and it depends on how large you’re going to print an image and how far away are you going to view it. With higher resolution sensors this softening will be more apparent if you look closely enough. The result may just give the impression that you’ve shot on a lower resolution camera, and for web size images or small prints may well not be a concern for some.

18034_1633984326.jpg

The full image at f/32 as displayed on the web looks fine.

The effect is much more noticeable when I use an extender and extension tube on the macro lens below f/11, but then the lens was never designed for that extreme use. I’ve found apertures down to f/11 are fine, and as depth of field is so minimal at such close quarters I’ll forego that fraction of a millimetre for better overall sharpness.

18034_1633984386.jpg

I used my macro lens for these images which is designed to hold up well at these smaller apertures. I have to say I’ve very rarely gone below f/16 in normal use or noticed anything untoward on earlier lower resolution sensors. That said, all lenses are different so you need to do your own tests. Zooms, particularly at the cheaper end of the market, are much more likely to suffer image quality reduction at the small apertures. I have come across images online that even at that reduced size (from the original capture) do show a marked softness, while at the same time ruling out as far as possible camera rigidity and ISO effects.

18034_1633984441.jpg

Look closely and the detail isn’t as crisp as it is at f/8, but are you going to look this close?

Small apertures and diffraction effects are the reason you won’t find apertures below f/8 on small sensor cameras, and indeed f/8 will, on those cameras, give as much depth of field as you’re likely to need.

Are there good things about diffraction? When you’re down to X-ray wavelengths diffraction patterns are created by the arrangements of atoms which allow molecular structures to be determined. That’s important in areas such as novel drug development. So some diffraction is not all bad.

All text and images © Keith Rowley 2021

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : brinkburn priory part two – the mansion

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Brinkburn Priory Part Two – The Mansion

11 Oct 2021 12:04PM  
Views : 103
Unique : 89

Just a few steps away from Brinkburn Priory is the Mansion, a fascinating and tantalising insight into what it might once have been and indeed how it was constructed. It’s a pity that our son Mike, who is an architect, wasn’t there as well as he would have been able to answer the questions that I had. Still, one good speculation is worth a thousand certainties, so here goes with a sampling of first the outside and then the interior. Camera was the Pentax K-3 II, used at whatever ludicrous ISO values as necessary, with the Pentax 12-24mm and 18-135mm lenses.

The Mansion is right next to the Priory
22471_1633949756.jpg

The kitchen range has survived in situ
22471_1633949793.jpg

Fragments of the finished interior exist throughout the ground floor
22471_1633949880.jpg

22471_1633949914.jpg

22471_1633949927.jpg

22471_1633949941.jpg

22471_1633949951.jpg

22471_1633949960.jpg

22471_1633949968.jpg

22471_1633949977.jpg

22471_1633949985.jpg

There must have been a point at which the interior was still absolutely gorgeous, maybe faded but something to want to preserve. How it could be trashed so is just shocking really, allowed to rot gently perhaps until it was too late in terms of cost, and then stripped bare of all its valuable fitments, leaving just fragments of fine plasterwork, the ocassional door, some wood panelling and the range. Presumably the range was too heavy to easily shift and regarded as old fashioned anyway.

But we can visit and explore and perhaps hear in our minds the bustle of a busy mansion, the chatter of afternoon teas and the swirling music of the ballroom in full swing.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : brinkburn priory part one – the priory

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Brinkburn Priory Part One – The Priory

10 Oct 2021 3:37PM  
Views : 29
Unique : 24

Before we set off on holiday we always have a “strategy meeting” and even though this time there were just the two of us, we held to the tradition. This meeting looks at the area and finds places to visit, and just as importantly when they they are open and closed. It saves long journeys to find that somewhewre only opens every other Wednesday, or, in the case of Brinkburn Priory that it is only open Saturday and Sunday throughout October. As we were at our holiday cottage Saturday to Saturday that meant that our visit to the Priory had to be Sunday, and so it was.

There is a small car park and thereafter a 400 yard walk to the Priory. This is the first glimpse as we approach:
22471_1633875879.jpg

The priory is in superb condition and clearly still in use. Here’s a selection of images showing the interior. Pentax K-3 II and SMC Pentax-DA 18-135mm WR lens.
22471_1633875998.jpg

22471_1633876024.jpg

22471_1633876050.jpg

22471_1633876061.jpg

The magnifiecent organ was being played while we were there, and it is a wonderful sound, shaking the very ground we were stood on.
22471_1633876087.jpg

22471_1633876152.jpg

22471_1633876165.jpg

Ceilings can be spectacular, and shooting them can be the hard way, complete with crick in the neck, or the easy way. The easy way may need a few shots to get the perfect alingment, but place the camera on the ground, lens pointing upwards obviously, and use the self timer to activate the shutter release. 10 or 12 seconds to step back out of the way should suffice and a wide angle lens is a good place to start. Other visitors will soon pick up on the idea!
22471_1633876327.jpg

22471_1633876338.jpg

Moving onward out of the opposte door in the Priory we find that the Manor House is only a few steps away. Tomorrow’s blog will take us inside, but for now here are the Manor House and the Priory as the sun came out and bathed them both in a warm autumn glow.
22471_1633876432.jpg

Source link