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Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency

Coming to market in January 2021, the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)’s launch price puts it into the Premium ($600-$799) segment. Like its Exynos twin, it comes with a number of attractive features, including a triple-camera setup. Our team of battery experts recently put it through our DXOMARK testing protocol; what follows is a summary of the results.

Key specifications:

  • Battery capacity: 4000 mAh
  • 25W (charger not included)
  • 6.2-inch, 1080 x 2400, 120 Hz OLED display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 5G (5 nm) chipset
  • Tested RAM / storage combination: 8 GB + 128 GB

About DXOMARK Battery tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone battery reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective tests over a week-long period both indoors and outdoors. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. (See our introductory and how we test articles for more details about our smartphone Battery protocol.)

Test summary

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 1Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 2

69

battery

Pros

  • Good efficiency both during charge up and when in use
  • Charger has very low residual power drain both during trickle charging and when phone is not connected
  • Wireless charging is convenient

Cons

  • Below-average charging speed
  • Above-average battery drain when screen is off in idle, music streaming and calls

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) racks up an above-average overall score in its segment, beating its Exynos sibling and doing largely better than the two competitor devices in this review, the Apple iPhone 12 mini and the Google Pixel 5, due primarily to better performance in our autonomy tests. The table below shows the battery capacity, charger, display type and resolution, and processor specifications for the Snapdragon version of the S21 5G and for the Apple and Google devices.

 Samsung Galaxy S21 (Snapdragon)

Apple iPhone 12 miniGoogle Pixel 5
Battery capacity (mAh)

4000

22274080
Charger

25W

20W18W
Wireless charging

15W

12W

12W

Display type, max Hz

OLEDOLED

OLED

Display resolution

1080 x 24001080 x 2340

1080 x 2340

Chipset

Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 5GA14 Bionic

Qualcomm Snapdragon 765 5G

Autonomy (55)

How long a battery charge lasts depends not only on battery capacity, but also other aspects of the phone’s hardware and software. The DXOMARK Battery autonomy score is composed of three performance sub-scores: (1) Stationary, (2) On the go, and (3) Calibrated use cases. Each sub-score comprises the results of a comprehensive range of tests for measuring autonomy in all kinds of real-life scenarios.

Light Usage

71h

Light

Active: 2h30/day

Moderate Usage

50h

Moderate

Active: 4h/day

Intense Usage

31h

Intense

Active: 7h/day

Among its competitors, the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) puts in a good performance, with a score that is above average for its segment, but just under the average for the entire Battery protocol database.

In terms of linearity, the battery percentage indicator on the Samsung S21 5G (Snapdragon) is very accurate and reliable.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 4

Stationary

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

57

104

Vivo Y72 5G

Best: Vivo Y72 5G (104)

A robot housed in a Faraday cage performs a set of touch-based user actions during what we call our “typical usage scenario” (TUS) — making calls, video streaming, etc. — 4 hours of active use over the course of a 16-hour period, plus 8 hours of “sleep.” The robot repeats this set of actions every day until the device runs out of power. 

In our TUS tests, the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) lasts more than 56 hours, which is both above average for its segment and longer than its rivals, with the Apple iPhone12 mini coming in at 43 hours 22 minutes and the Google Pixel 5 lasting for 47 hours 30 minutes. However, the Samsung’s results are around four hours less than the average for all tested devices in our database.

Typical Usage Scenario discharge curves

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 5

On the go

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

55

96

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (96)

Using a smartphone on the go takes a toll on autonomy because of extra “hidden” demands, such as the continuous signaling associated with cellphone network selection, for example. DXOMARK Battery experts take the phone outside and perform a precisely defined set of activities while following the same three-hour travel itinerary for each device.

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)’s performance is very close to that of its rivals except for calling, where it did noticeably better than the Apple and Google devices (though only around the average for other devices in its price range).

Estimated autonomy for on the go use cases (full charge)

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 6

Calibrated

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

58

100

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (100)

For this series of tests, the smartphone returns to the Faraday cage and our robots repeatedly perform actions linked to one specific use case (such as gaming, video streaming, etc.) at a time. Starting from an 80% charge, all devices are tested until they have expended at least 5% of their battery power.

Both the Samsung and Google devices beat the Apple iPhone12 mini across the board, and while the Samsung takes the lead in 4G streaming and gaming tests, the Google Pixel 5 is ahead of the Samsung for 3G calling and video playback.

Estimated autonomy for calibrated use cases (full charge)

Charging (73)

The DXOMARK Battery charging score is composed of two sub-scores, Full charge and Quick boost. Full charge tests assess the reliability of the battery power gauge; measure how long it takes to charge a battery from 0% to 80% capacity and from 80% to 100%; and measure how long and how much power the battery takes to go from an indicated 100% to an actual full charge. With the phone at different charge levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%), Quick boost tests measure the amount of charge the battery receives after being plugged in for 5 minutes. 

Wired

Wired

Wireless

Wireless

Power consumption and battery level during full charge

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 7

Full charge

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

78

106

OnePlus 9

Best: OnePlus 9 (106)

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G went from 0 to an 80% in 48 minutes 34 seconds, which is better than its rivals, but it needed more than 45 minutes to charge from 80% to full capacity. Our engineers note that its charger never reached its maximum power of 25W.

While it takes the Snapdragon version of the S21 5G one hour longer to achieve a 100% charge via wireless charging, it is still a convenient option.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 8

Quick boost

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

67

108

Oppo Reno6 5G

Best: Oppo Reno6 5G (108)

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) provides more than two hours of autonomy when charged at 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%, beating both the Apple and Google devices for longevity following a 5-minute charge. Even so, the Samsung’s performance is below average for its segment.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)Apple iPhone 12 miniGoogle Pixel 5
Autonomy boost (hh:mm)20%2:382:432:16
40%2:452:312:16
60%2:091:531:46
80%1:571:201:13
Percentage boost20%7.4 %9.5 %6.9 %
40%7.7 %8.8 %6.9 %
60%6 %6.6 %5.4 %
80%5.5 %4.7 %3.7 %
Energy consumed20%1466 mWh1205 mWh1654 mWh
40%1528 mWh1119 mWh1656 mWh
60%1195 mWh838 mWh1294 mWh
80%1088 mWh591 mWh894 mWh

Efficiency (89)

Our Efficiency score comprises two sub-scores, Charge up and Discharge. Charge up is the efficiency of a full charge (how much energy is drained from the wall outlet vs the energy capacity of the battery, as well as the efficiency of the charger and its residual consumption). Discharge is how much current the smartphone drains from the battery when in use (the ratio of battery capacity to autonomy). Better autonomy with a smaller battery means better efficiency.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 9

Charge up

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

78

84

OnePlus 9

Best: OnePlus 9 (84)

Compared to its rivals, the S21 5G (Snapdragon) charging system is well designed, providing better charge and adapter efficiency, and better management of residual power drain.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) Battery review: Good efficiency 10

Discharge

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon)

90

121

Apple iPhone 13

Best: Apple iPhone 13 (121)

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Snapdragon) had good efficiency in all screen-on tests (gaming, video streaming, video playback), though the iPhone 12 mini is much more efficient, and can last almost as long with a much smaller 2227 mAh battery.

Conclusion

The Samsung S21 5G (Snapdragon) achieves decent autonomy overall, but it would have been nice to pair that with faster charging, which is quite common at this price range.

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Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency

Released in January 2021 at a price that places it in the Premium segment ($600-$799), the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) comes with a triple-camera setup and stereo speakers, among other attractive features. Let’s take a look at how its battery performed in our DXOMARK Battery protocol tests.

Key specifications:

  • Battery capacity: 4000 mAh
  • 25W (charger not included)
  • 6.2-inch, 1080 x 2400, 120 Hz OLED display
  • Exynos 2100 (5 nm) chipset
  • Tested RAM / storage combination: 8 GB + 128 GB

About DXOMARK Battery tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone battery reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective tests over a week-long period both indoors and outdoors. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. (See our introductory and how we test articles for more details about our smartphone Battery protocol.)

Test summary

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 11Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 12

63

battery

Pros

  • Decent efficiency, especially charge up
  • Supports wireless charging

Cons

  • Despite smaller battery, slower charging speed than competition

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) smartphone comes with a smaller battery and a slower charger than the two Premium devices used for comparison in this review, the Xiaomi Mi 11 and the Oppo Find X3 Neo. The table below shows the battery capacity, charger, display type and resolution, and processor specifications for the three devices.

 Samsung Galaxy S21 (Exynos)

Xiaomi Mi 11Oppo Find X3 Neo
Battery capacity (mAh)

4000

46004500
Charger

25W

55W65W
Wireless charging

15W

50W

No

Display type, max Hz

OLEDOLED

OLED

Display resolution

1080 x 24001440 x 3200

1080 x 2400

Chipset

Exynos 2100Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 5G

Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 5G

Autonomy (51)

How long a battery charge lasts depends not only on battery capacity, but also other aspects of the phone’s hardware and software. The DXOMARK Battery autonomy score is composed of three performance sub-scores: (1) Stationary, (2) On the go, and (3) Calibrated use cases. Each sub-score comprises the results of a comprehensive range of tests for measuring autonomy in all kinds of real-life scenarios.

Light Usage

65h

Light

Active: 2h30/day

Moderate Usage

46h

Moderate

Active: 4h/day

Intense Usage

29h

Intense

Active: 7h/day

The overall autonomy score for the Exynos version of the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G places it between the Xiaomi Mi 11 (36) and the Oppo Find X3 Neo (60). The Samsung provides relatively good autonomy despite its small 4000 mAh battery, while the Xiaomi struggles with a more power-consuming QHD+ display.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 14

Stationary

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

54

104

Vivo Y72 5G

Best: Vivo Y72 5G (104)

A robot housed in a Faraday cage performs a set of touch-based user actions during what we call our “typical usage scenario” (TUS) — making calls, video streaming, etc. — 4 hours of active use over the course of a 16-hour period, plus 8 hours of “sleep.” The robot repeats this set of actions every day until the device runs out of power. 

Lasting 51 hours 27 minutes in our TUS tests, the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) lands in the bottom quarter of the DXOMARK database. While it is still ahead of the Xiaomi Mi 11, the Oppo lasts 7 hours 30 minutes longer.

Typical Usage Scenario discharge curves

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 15

On the go

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

54

96

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (96)

Using a smartphone on the go takes a toll on autonomy because of extra “hidden” demands, such as the continuous signaling associated with cellphone network selection, for example. DXOMARK Battery experts take the phone outside and perform a precisely defined set of activities while following the same three-hour travel itinerary for each device.

The Samsung device goes head to head with the Oppo Find X3 Neo in all mobility use cases, and both the Samsung and the Oppo perform slightly better than the Xiaomi Mi 11.

Estimated autonomy for on the go use cases (full charge)

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 16

Calibrated

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

52

100

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (100)

For this series of tests, the smartphone returns to the Faraday cage and our robots repeatedly perform actions linked to one specific use case (such as gaming, video streaming, etc.) at a time. Starting from an 80% charge, all devices are tested until they have expended at least 5% of their battery power.

While the performance of the Exynos version of the Galaxy S21 5G for gaming and for video and music streaming via 4G was disappointing, the device did a good job for both video streaming via WiFi and video playback. But the Oppo Find X3 Neo had better autonomy in all calibrated use cases.

Estimated autonomy for calibrated use cases (full charge)

Charging (73)

The DXOMARK Battery charging score is composed of two sub-scores, Full charge and Quick boost. Full charge tests assess the reliability of the battery power gauge; measure how long it takes to charge a battery from 0% to 80% capacity and from 80% to 100%; and measure how long and how much power the battery takes to go from an indicated 100% to an actual full charge. With the phone at different charge levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%), Quick boost tests measure the amount of charge the battery receives after being plugged in for 5 minutes. 

Wired

Wired

Wireless

Wireless

The S21 5G (Exynos)’s charging performance is average among all devices tested, but its rivals do better, especially the Oppo Find X3 Neo, one of the top scorers for this attribute to date.

Power consumption and battery level during full charge

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 17

Full charge

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

75

104

Oppo Find X3 Pro

Best: Oppo Find X3 Pro (104)

It takes the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) 48 minutes to go from 0 to an 80% charge, which is good. However, the Xiaomi Mi 11 takes just 30 minutes to achieve the same charge, and the Find X3 Neo takes even less time — only 23 minutes.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 18

Quick boost

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

66

95

Oppo Find X3 Neo

Best: Oppo Find X3 Neo (95)

Users can expect only 2 hours 30 minutes of additional battery life after charging the Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) for 5 minutes with 20% power remaining, which is a poor showing when compared to the Oppo Find X3 Neo in particular.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)Xiaomi Mi 11Oppo Find X3 Neo
Autonomy boost (hh:mm)20%2:332:528:20
40%2:363:096:26
60%2:052:545:29
80%2:011:514:14
Percentage boost20%7.4 %11.2 %22.1 %
40%7.6 %12.3 %17 %
60%6.1 %11.3 %14.5 %
80%5.9 %7.3 %11.2 %
Energy consumed20%1458 mWh2674 mWh4712 mWh
40%1487 mWh2945 mWh3637 mWh
60%1192 mWh2709 mWh3103 mWh
80%1148 mWh1735 mWh2399 mWh

Efficiency (75)

Our Efficiency score comprises two sub-scores, Charge up and Discharge. Charge up is the efficiency of a full charge (how much energy is drained from the wall outlet vs the energy capacity of the battery, as well as the efficiency of the charger and its residual consumption). Discharge is how much current the smartphone drains from the battery when in use (the ratio of battery capacity to autonomy). Better autonomy with a smaller battery means better efficiency.

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) posts an average overall score in our Efficiency testing. Among its rivals, it is far ahead of the Xiaomi (46) but behind the Oppo (87).

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 19

Charge up

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

79

82

Oppo Find X3 Neo

Best: Oppo Find X3 Neo (82)

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)’s adapter is very efficient and consumes almost nothing (just 11 mW) when the phone is detached. By contrast, however, users should unplug the Samsung’s wireless charger when not in use.

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) Battery review: Good charge-up efficiency 20

Discharge

Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos)

73

121

Apple iPhone 12 mini

Best: Apple iPhone 12 mini (121)

The Samsung device lands between the Xiaomi (46) and the Oppo (85) for discharge efficiency, and despite its relatively small battery capacity (4000 mAh), it offers decent autonomy.

Conclusion

The Samsung Galaxy S21 5G (Exynos) is a well-built device, which is reflected in its decent scores for efficiency. While it lands in the bottom half of our database among all devices tested to date, it is well within the norms for Premium segment devices. The Xiaomi and Oppo smartphones have much better charging times compared to the S21 5G, but the Samsung device’s charging is nonetheless very efficient.

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Samsung Introduces Fast and Durable PRO Plus and Enhanced EVO Plus microSD Cards for Day-to-Day Users and Professionals

Samsung Introduces Fast and Durable PRO Plus and Enhanced EVO Plus microSD Cards for Day-to-Day Users and Professionals

Samsung Introduces Fast and Durable PRO Plus and Enhanced EVO Plus microSD Cards for Day-to-Day Users and Professionals 21

 

Samsung Introduces Fast and Durable PRO Plus and Enhanced EVO Plus microSD Cards for Day-to-Day Users and Professionals

New 2021 microSD card lineup offers fast read/write speeds and Samsung’s six-proof protection.
Advanced microSD cards are ideal for a wide variety of uses, including mobile device memory expansion, 4K UHD video storage, action cameras and drones.

Samsung Electronics, the world leader in advanced memory technology, today unveiled its new PRO Plus microSD card and a redesigned and enhanced EVO Plus microSD card. Samsung provides customers a comprehensive offering for day-to-day and professional storage needs with a new lineup of microSDs that offer lightning-fast read and write speeds[1], increased durability and a wide variety of capacity options. 

The new microSD cards are ideal for expanded mobile device storage and capturing high-quality photos, 4K Ultra HD (UHD) video[2] and other content on action cameras and drones – even in extreme conditions.

Samsung’s newest microSDs offer improved six-proof protection, two more layers of protection than the previous generation, making them able to withstand water, extreme temperatures[3], x-ray, wear out[4], drops and magnetic impact. Offered with a 10-year limited warranty[5], the PRO Plus and EVO Plus microSDs thus enable users to store data without the worry of lack of space, while also providing confidence that the content is well protected.

Professionals and consumers of all kinds want memory cards that make it easy to save and retrieve data while also knowing that their valuable images and video files are protected,” said KyuYoung Lee, vice president of the Brand Product Biz Team at Samsung Electronics. “Samsung’s new suite of microSD cards offer the features and capabilities consumers and professionals need: faster speeds along with increased reliability and durability to deliver the ultra-high performance every user wants.

PRO Plus microSD cards, a new addition to Samsung’s microSD lineup, are designed for more discerning content creators, offering exceptional read and write speeds of up to 160MB/s and 120MB/s[6], respectively. The PRO Plus microSD cards will be available in 128GB, 256GB and 512GB capacities.

The EVO Plus microSD is designed to give casual users peace of mind by providing high reliability and stable performance during day-to-day use. It offers transfer speeds of up to 130MB/s[7], providing up to 1.3x faster sequential read speed when compared to the previous version. The EVO Plus microSD cards will be available in 64GB, 128GB, 256GB and 512GB capacities.

The PRO Plus and EVO Plus microSD cards, featuring a reimagined Blue Wave design that gives the cards a fresh new look, will be available early October. An SD adaptor will also be included with each microSD card to expand its usage across multiple devices.

The suggested started retai price for the Samsung EVO Plus range is £11.99 (64GB) and £24.99 (128GB) for the PRO Plus range.

For more information on Samsung’s microSD card offerings, please visit www.samsung.com/uk/memory-storage or samsung.com/memorycard or samsung.com/memorycard.

Samsung Introduces Fast and Durable PRO Plus and Enhanced EVO Plus microSD Cards for Day-to-Day Users and Professionals 22

[1] The read & write speeds are based on internal tests conducted under controlled conditions. Actual speeds may vary depending upon card capacity and device compatibility. Stated performance is achieved by using microSD with Samsung readers.

2 EVO Plus 64GB is not supported

3 Temperature proof: operating temperatures of -25 C to 85 C; non-operating temperatures of -40 C to 85 C.

4up to 10,000 swipes

5 https://www.samsung.com/uk/support/memory-card-warranty/

6 Stated performance is achieved by using PRO Plus microSD cards with Samsung readers.

7 Stated performance is achieved by using EVO Plus microSD cards with Samsung readers.

8 Up to 160MB/s read speeds, engineered with proprietary technology to reach speeds beyond UHS-I 104MB/s, require compatible devices capable of reaching such speeds. Up to 120MB/s write speeds. Based on Samsung’s internal testing; performance may be lower depending upon host device interface, usage conditions and other factors.

YOU CAN READ HERE ABOUT THE BEST SELLING MICRO AND MICRO SD CARDS IN 2021, SO FAR

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Samsung Launches the First-Ever 200-Megapixel Smartphone Sensor

Samsung Launches the First-Ever 200-Megapixel Smartphone Sensor

Samsung Launches the First-Ever 200-Megapixel Smartphone Sensor 23

Samsung has announced the ISOCELL HP1, an industry-first 200MP resolution based on 0.64 µm-pixels and new pixel-binning technology it calls ChameleonCell.

Samsung also announced the GN5, what it calls the first image sensor to use all-directional focusing Dual Pixel Pro technologies with to photodiodes in a single 1.0μm pixel.

ISOCELL HP1

The industry-first 200-megapixel sensor is based on the company’s most advanced 0.64μm-sized pixels and is designed to bring massive resolution into the small form factor that are smartphones. The company promises that the new sensor will allow for incredible levels of detail that helps photos stay sharp even when cropped or resized.

The ChameleonCell technology is designed to improve low-light performance and is a pixel-binning system that uses a two-by-two, four-by-four, or full pixel layout depending on the environment. When the sensor detects a low light environment, it “transforms” itself into a 12.5-megapixel image sensor with much larger 2.56μm pixels by merging 16 neighboring pixels together. In this arrangement, the sensor is able to absorb considerably more light and produce clearer photos in dark spaces.

Conversely, in bright light, the sensor switches back to its full 200-megapixel maximum resolution. In this mode, the camera is capable of capturing 8K video at up to 30 frames per second with a slight crop, which Samsung says is a minimal loss to the field of view. The HP1 merges four neighboring pixels to bring the resolution down to 50MP or 8,192 x 6,144 to take 8K (7,680 x 4,320) videos without the need to crop or scale down the full image resolution.

Samsung Launches the First-Ever 200-Megapixel Smartphone Sensor 24

The HP1 uses what Samsung describes as a Double Super Phase Detection system that the company claims enables faster, more accurate focus thanks to the use of micro-lenses and dedicated autofocus pixels. Double Super PD contains twice as many autofocus pixels as Super PD, amd ech micro-lens covers two autofocus pixels, comparing the left and right phases to focus the image.

Samsung Launches the First-Ever 200-Megapixel Smartphone Sensor 25

ISOCELL GN5

The GN5 is what Samsung claims to be the first 1.0μm image sensor to integrate Dual Pixel Pro, the company’s all-directional autofocusing technology that it detailed in February. In short, the technology places two photodiodes within each 1.0μm pixel of the sensor either horizontally or vertically to recognize pattern changes in all directions. With one million phase-detecting multi-directional photodiodes covering all areas of the sensor, Samsung claims that the ISOCELL GN5’s autofocusing becomes instantaneous and will work in reliably in all lighting environments.

The image sensor also makes use of Samsung’s proprietary pixel technology, which applies Front Deep Trench Isolation (FDTI) on a Dual Pixel product for the first time in the industry. Despite the microscopic photodiode size, FDTI enables each photodiode to absorb and hold more light information, improving the photodiodes’ full-well capacity (FWC) and decreasing crosstalk within the pixel.

Samsung did not provide any details on if the sensor will be going into mass production, but samples of both the HM1 and GN5 are currently available for smartphone manufacturers.

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Apple’s Periscope Lens Plans Stymied by Samsung Patent: Report

Apple's Periscope Lens Plans Stymied by Samsung Patent: Report

Apple's Periscope Lens Plans Stymied by Samsung Patent: Report 26

Apple is reportedly hoping to integrate a periscope camera lens system into its iPhones as soon as 2023, but a new report out of Korea alleges that the Silicon Valley giant may have run up against a problem: a Samsung patent.

As some background, “periscope” is the term used to describe a “folded” lens system that can squeeze greater zoom capabilities into the tiny camera arrays found in smartphones by redirecting light sideways through the body of the device via a sequence of lenses and mirrors or prisms. The design is deemed “periscope” because it mimics how a submarine periscope looks and works.

As PetaPixel has reported in the past, such technology is behind the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra’s 10x optical zoom, which is considerably more than the iPhone 12 Pro Max’s 2.5x zoom.

Apple has filed multiple patents for “folded” lens type periscope camera designs in the past, including one that was granted as recently as July and another from August that integrates optical image stabilization.

There are varying ways to construct a periscope lens especially when it comes to how a company moves the lens’s barrel. According to a report from The Elec, Apple wants to use a ball actuator to move the lens barrel, which is in contrast to the spring actuator that it currently uses on its iPhones. Unfortunately for Apple, Samsung — who has a technical lead on the technology over Apple — holds that patent.

Apple's Periscope Lens Plans Stymied by Samsung Patent: Report 27
Samsung Electro-Mechanics

The Elec explains that Apple was planning to supply folded zoom camera modules from a long-time supplier for the company, LG InnoTek, which procured the ball actuators from Samsung Electro-Mechanics.

If Cupertino have chosen this route, it would have replaced its actuator partners Alps Electric and Mitsumi Electric with Samsung Electro-Mechanics.

Meanwhile, Apple reviewed Jahwa Electronics’ optical image stabilization module factory during the first half of the year.

OIS are conventionally integrated with autofocus actuator to form one module. The integrated module is Jahwa’s main product. Combining it with an image sensor and a board completes a camera module.

However, Jahwa co-developed the OIS technology with Samsung and Samsung Electro-Mechanics, raising concerns that it may not be able to supply them to Apple.

Faced with this issue, Apple will either have to change its entire design to avoid using the patented technology or will have to pay Samsung a fee to license the rights to the patent. Both are of course options for the tech giant, but it is likely not a choice the company was expecting to have to make.


Image credits: Header image via Oppo

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Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation

Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation

The Samsung Galaxy A12 is a budget smartphone competing in the Essential segment ($200 or under). Despite the modest price point, it offers some impressive specs, including an octa-core processor, a 6.5-inch TFT display with HD+ resolution, and 64 GB of internal memory to store your photos and videos.

For the rear camera, the primary module with a 48 MP sensor is assisted by a 5 MP ultra-wide, a 2 MP macro camera, and a depth sensor. Let’s see how this combo does in the DXOMARK Camera test.

Key camera specifications:

  • Primary: 48 MP sensor, f/2.0-aperture lens, AF
  • Ultra-wide: 5 MP sensor, f/2.2-aperture lens
  • Macro: 2 MP sensor, f2.4-aperture lens
  • Depth: 2 MP sensor, f/2.4-aperture lens
  • LED flash
  • Video: 1080p/30 fps

About DXOMARK Camera tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone camera reviews, DXOMARK engineers capture and evaluate over 3000 test images and more than 2.5 hours of video both in controlled lab environments and in natural indoor and outdoor scenes, using the camera’s default settings. This article is designed to highlight the most important results of our testing. For more information about the DXOMARK Camera test protocol, click here. More details on how we score smartphone cameras are available here.

Test summary

Pros

  • Good target exposure and fairly wide dynamic range in bright light and indoors
  • Stable white balance, well-controlled color artifacts
  • Natural blur gradient in bokeh mode
  • Mostly accurate exposure and white balance as well as decent detail in bright-light videos

Cons

  • Exposure and dynamic range instabilities across consecutive shots and in videos
  • Noise on moving subjects, lack of detail in low light
  • Low level of detail on ultra-wide camera
  • Focus failures in medium- and long-range tele shots in bright light and indoors
  • Ineffective stabilization and limited dynamic range in videos

With a DXOMARK Camera score of 90, the Samsung Galaxy A12 cannot keep up with higher-end devices using more sophisticated camera technologies, but delivers very decent camera value for the money.

Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation 28

Exposure is accurate and dynamic range is fairly wide in landscape shots, colors are rendered accurately, and white balance is often pleasant.

Exposure is usually accurate in photo mode and a fairly wide dynamic range allows for shooting in challenging high-contrast conditions. White balance, something many devices in the Samsung’s price bracket struggle with, is nice in most conditions, too. However, instabilities prevent a higher Photo score. HDR mode does not reliably kick in on consecutive shots; we saw some autofocus failures; and bokeh mode does not activate for some challenging scenes.

Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation 29

Night: slight underexposure, limited dynamic range

Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation 30

Wide (18 mm): lack of detail, inaccurate skin tones, corner softness

The ultra-wide camera allows you to squeeze more scene into the frame, but image quality lacks in some areas. With the 5 MP sensor, texture rendering is low and there are no intermediate steps when zooming between ultra-wide and primary cameras. Tele zooming on the primary camera usually results in low detail as well, but the Samsung’s overall Zoom performance is still among the best in the Essential segment, despite the lack of a dedicated tele-camera. 

Samsung Galaxy A12, bokeh mode

Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation 32

Samsung Galaxy A12, crop: slight depth estimation issues but natural effect overall

Samsung Galaxy A12, 90 mm tele zoom

Samsung Galaxy A12 Camera review: Essential recommendation 34

Samsung Galaxy A12, crop: noise and low level of detail; good target exposure but limited dynamic range

The A12 is capable of recording pretty nice looking 1080p/30 fps videos in bright light, but stabilization isn’t too effective and limited dynamic range means high-contrast conditions are best avoided. Things go slightly downhill in indoor and low-light conditions, where strong noise becomes visible.

Exposure and white balance are good in bright light videos, but ineffective stabilization results in shaky footage.

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Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go

Released in March 2021, the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G lands in our High-end ($400-599) segment and comes with a number of attractive features, including an AMOLED display with a 120 Hz refresh rate and a multi-camera setup with a 64 MP main camera. We put the Galaxy A52 5G through our comprehensive battery tests, and present a summary of the results here.

Key specifications:

  • Battery capacity: 4500 mAh
  • 15W charger included (can support 25W)
  • 6.5-inch, 1080 x 2400, 120 Hz AMOLED display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 750G 5G (8 nm) chipset
  • Tested RAM / storage combination: 6 GB + 128 GB

About DXOMARK Battery tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone battery reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective tests over a week-long period both indoors and outdoors. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. (See our introductory and how we test articles for more details about our smartphone Battery protocol.)

Test summary

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 35Samsung Galaxy A52 5G

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 36

67

battery

Pros

  • Provides more than two days of autonomy with moderate use
  • Good results in on the go testing
  • Efficient device overall

Cons

  • Lengthy charging time due to 15W charger

From its overall score, one might be tempted to pass over the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G, but its below-average overall score is directly due to its poor charging performance.

The table below shows the battery capacity, charger, display type and resolution, and processor specifications for the Samsung A52 5G and two other devices in our High-end segment, the Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro 5G and the Oppo Find X3 Lite.

Samsung A52 5G

Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro 5G

Oppo Find X3 Lite

Battery (mAh)

4500

5000

4300

Charger

15W

33W

65W

Display type

AMOLED

LCD

AMOLED

Resolution

1080 x 2400

1080 x 2400

1080 x 2400

Processor

Qualcomm Snapdragon 750G 5G

Qualcomm Snapdragon 865

Qualcomm Snapdragon 765 5G

Autonomy (62)

How long a battery charge lasts depends not only on battery capacity, but also other aspects of the phone’s hardware and software. The DXOMARK Battery autonomy score is composed of three performance sub-scores: (1) Stationary, (2) On the go, and (3) Calibrated use cases. Each sub-score comprises the results of a comprehensive range of tests for measuring autonomy in all kinds of real-life scenarios.

Light Usage

82h

Light

Active: 2h30/day

Moderate Usage

56h

Moderate

Active: 4h/day

Intense Usage

34h

Intense

Active: 7h/day

The Samsung Galaxy A52 5G puts in a slightly above-average performance for autonomy in our database, and comes in highest overall among devices in the High-end segment for this attribute.

In terms of linearity, our tests showed that while you can generally rely on the battery gauge. The last 5% drops more slowly, however, giving you more power than expected until it turns off.

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 38

Stationary

Wiko Power U30

Best: Wiko Power U30 (104)

A robot housed in a Faraday cage performs a set of touch-based user actions during what we call our “typical usage scenario” (TUS) — making calls, video streaming, etc. — 4 hours of active use over the course of a 16-hour period, plus 8 hours of “sleep.” The robot repeats this set of actions every day until the device runs out of power. 

The Samsung Galaxy A52 5G lasted 57 hours 32 minutes in our TUS testing versus 61 hours 13 for the Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro and 46 hours 20 minutes for the Oppo Find X3 Lite. The Samsung lost only 1.33% lost per night on average versus 2% for the Xiaomi and the Oppo.

Typical Usage Scenario discharge curves

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 39

On the go

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (96)

Using a smartphone on the go takes a toll on autonomy because of extra “hidden” demands, such as the continuous signaling associated with cellphone network selection, for example. DXOMARK Battery experts take the phone outside and perform a precisely defined set of activities while following the same three-hour travel itinerary for each device.

The Samsung Galaxy A52 5G soundly bested both rivals in our our on the go tests, with better results in all of our use cases, particularly in 3G calling.

Estimated autonomy for on the go use cases (full charge)

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 40

Calibrated

Samsung Galaxy M51

Best: Samsung Galaxy M51 (100)

For this series of tests, the smartphone returns to the Faraday cage and our robots repeatedly perform actions linked to one specific use case (such as gaming, video streaming, etc.) at a time. Starting from an 80% charge, all devices are tested until they have expended at least 5% of their battery power.

Back in the lab, the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G again bests its rivals (3 points over the Xiaomi and 10 points over the Oppo). The Samsung manages its screen-off idle mode better than its competitors, and does a better job when it comes to 3G calling, video streaming via 4G, and and especially music streaming. However, its rivals did better when streaming video via WiFi, when playing back video, and especially when gaming.

Estimated autonomy for calibrated use cases (full charge)

Charging (61)

The DXOMARK Battery charging score is composed of two sub-scores, Full charge and Quick boost. Full charge tests assess the reliability of the battery power gauge; measure how long it takes to charge a battery from 0% to 80% capacity and from 80% to 100%; and measure how long and how much power the battery takes to go from an indicated 100% to an actual full charge. With the phone at different charge levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%), Quick boost tests measure the amount of charge the battery receives after being plugged in for 5 minutes. 

Wired

Wired

The Samsung Galaxy A52 5G can support charging at 25W, so it is a bit of a pity that it comes with only a 15W charger, which put it at a disadvantage in this attribute, with the Xiaomi device coming in at 79 and the Oppo device scoring 92.

Power consumption and battery level during full charge

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 41

Full charge

Oppo Find X3 Pro

Best: Oppo Find X3 Pro (104)

It takes almost two hours to fully charge the Samsung A52 5G, which is 50 minutes longer than the Xiaomi and 1 hour 15 minutes longer than the Oppo.

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 42

Quick boost

Oppo Find X3 Neo

Best: Oppo Find X3 Neo (95)

You can expect to get nearly 1 hour 50 minutes of autonomy after charging the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G for five minutes — not all that long, but unsurprising, given the 15W charger. By contrast, the Xiaomi provides almost 4 hours and the Oppo 6 hours of use when charged for five minutes at 20% power remaining.

Samsung Galaxy A52 5GXiaomi Mi 10T Pro 5GOppo Find X3 Lite
Autonomy boost (hh:mm)20%1:493:505:56
40%1:513:585:27
60%1:543:483:33
80%1:583:233:05
Percentage boost20%5.1 %9.5 %18.9 %
40%5.2 %9.9 %17.4 %
60%5.4 %9.5 %11.3 %
80%5.6 %8.4 %9.8 %
Energy consumed20%1235 mWh2416 mWh3983 mWh
40%1260 mWh2498 mWh3668 mWh
60%1293 mWh2397 mWh2384 mWh
80%1346 mWh2131 mWh2069 mWh

Efficiency (81)

Our Efficiency score comprises two sub-scores, Charge up and Discharge. Charge up is the efficiency of a full charge (how much energy is drained from the wall outlet vs the energy capacity of the battery, as well as the efficiency of the charger and its residual consumption). Discharge is how much current the smartphone drains from the battery when in use (the ratio of battery capacity over autonomy). Better autonomy with a smaller battery means better efficiency.

With a score of 81, the Samsung device is comfortably above the average, and above both the Xiaomi and the Oppo (at 69 and 74, respectively). Despite having an average-sized battery, it shows good results for autonomy among devices in its segment.

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 43

Charge up

Oppo Find X3 Neo

Best: Oppo Find X3 Neo (82)

The Galaxy A52 5G’s adapter efficiency of 88.7% is slightly above that of the Find X3 Lite (87.3%), but the Mi 10T Pro 5G does better (90%).

Samsung A52 5G Battery review: Good on the go 44

Discharge

Apple iPhone 12 mini

Best: Apple iPhone 12 mini (121)

Though the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G has low current consumption when its screen is off in idle mode and when making calls and streaming music, it consumes more battery power when gaming and playing back video than its competitors.

Conclusion

The only true downside of the Samsung Galaxy A52 5G is its lengthy charging time, particularly when  compared to its rivals, and that is largely attributable to the Samsung’s 15W in-box charger (vs. 33W for the Xiaomi and 65W for the Oppo). With a compatible 25W charger, the charging experience would  likely improve significantly. The Samsung Galaxy A52 5G provides more than two days of autonomy, and put in an especially good performance in our on the go tests.

 

 

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Samsung Designs Variable Aperture ‘Moving’ Smartphone Camera

Samsung Designs Variable Aperture 'Moving' Smartphone Camera

Samsung Designs Variable Aperture 'Moving' Smartphone Camera 45

Samsung has been granted a patent for what it is described as a camera with a moveable construction. The three cameras in the array are arranged in a T-shape and a motorized gear moves them in a sliding motion, which changes their aperture in the process.

Unearthed and illustrated by LetsGoDigital, the company describes a system that places a main wide-angle lens in the center of a “T” shape, with the ultra-wide and telephoto lenses on the left and the right of the main camera. In their default setting, the cameras are placed in a line next to each other, but depending on the desire of the photographer, the center lens can move downwards (initiated by the smartphone camera app interface) which then slides the two other lenses inwards which forms a triangle shape.

Samsung Designs Variable Aperture 'Moving' Smartphone Camera 46

As the distance between the cameras changes, the aperture is described as also changes. When the cameras are aligned in the most extreme triangle shape, the aperture is the smallest, when the cameras are in a line, the aperture is at its widest.

Theoretically, this design would allow photographers to adjust the aperture as they see fit for a specific scene and do so with a high degree of granularity. It sounds as though the smartphone app will allow the motor that moves the cameras to be adjusted on a slider, so photographers can look at a scene and adjust the amount of defocused background blur in real-time while looking at the results.

Variable aperture in smartphones is rare, but not unprecedented. As LetsGoDigital explains, Samsung actually has implemented it before in the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S10 smartphones, but in those two cases, only the wide-angle camera could adjust its aperture. This design would allow the aperture of all three cameras to be changed.

Samsung Designs Variable Aperture 'Moving' Smartphone Camera 47

A possible downside of this design is, as is the case with many of the unusual patents that smartphone companies are granted, durability. As seen in the schematics above, the system is driven by a geared motor and a screw, and that single motor controls the movement of the entire array. Should anything happen to that one motor, the entire camera system would be stuck.

Still, it is at least an attempt to bring features found in even small standalone cameras to the smartphone but as always, it’s never clear if Samsung will actually make use of the patent in a consumer product.


Image credits: Images provided courtesy of LetsGoDigital and used per publication guidelines.

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Inexpensive Samsung Galaxy M32 Smartphone Features Quad Camera

Inexpensive Samsung Galaxy M32 Smartphone Features Quad Camera

Samsung has expanded the Galaxy M Series with a smartphone that offers some impressive on-paper features at an accessible price point.

| 
Camera Phones

Samsung Galaxy M32

Samsung has officially launched the Samsung Galaxy M32 in the UK where it will become available at the end of this month (July) for around £269 on Amazon UK. 

The Samsung Galaxy M32 comes with an Infinity-U super AMOLED display, quad camera and a 5000mAh battery that supports fast charging while on the front is a 20MP selfie camera that sits towards the top of the screen. The M32 also comes with facial recognition and a side-mounted fingerprint sensor.

Samsung Galaxy M32 Specs:

  • Rear Camera: 64MP Wide, 8MP Ultra Wide, 2MP Depth, 2MP Macro
  • Selfe Camera: 20MP
  • Display: 6.4″ FHD+ Infinity-U
  • Dimensions: 159.1 x 74.0 x 8.4mm
  • Battery: 5000mAh (with fast charging)
  • Memory: 6GB + 128GB

 

Price & Availability: The Samsung Galaxy M32 will be available towards the end of July 2021 priced at £269 over on Amazon UK which comfortably places it in the ‘budget smartphone‘ line-up. 

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Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation

Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation

Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation 48

Samsung made waves with its Galaxy S21 smartphone launched last year thanks to notable improvements to its camera system. Multiple rumors have speculated the smartphone manufacturer would partner with Olympus in the S22 Ultra, and a new render of what that might look like has renewed that speculation.

In early April, rumors that Samsung would be partnering with Olympus — or more accurately, OM Digital Solutions — sprung up. And while Olympus said that it would collaborate with other companies that aren’t in the camera or lens industry at CP+ earlier this year, there were reasons to doubt the veracity of these reports. As also reported by Sammobile, Samsung is reportedly working on a new Exynos processor that is codenamed “Olympus,” so seeing the names appear together in rumors may simply the result of a bad translation or misunderstanding.

Still, an early rendering published by LetsGoDigital showed what that partnership might look like.

Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation 49

Additional reports about the alleged partnership have been absent in recent months, but LetsGoDigital may spark renewed interest thanks to a set of very convincing new renders combined with a well-produced promo video all made by TechnizoConcept.

LetsGoDigital says that because of the silicon shortage, fans should not expect a Note 21 this year, which is why the manufacturer is expected to package the popular S Pen with the Galaxy S22. More than that, Samsung will have its efforts focused on making the S22 Ultra even more impressive due to the lack of a Note smartphone.

Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation 50

“Samsung seems to have big plans for the camera this time,” the publication says. “Stories have been circulating for some time that the South Korean manufacturer has started a collaboration with the Japanese company Olympus.”

Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation 51

LetsGoDigital says to expect the partnership with Olympus to feel similar to how OnePlus works with Hasselblad, Huawei with Leica, and Sony with Zeiss. The result is rumored to be a massive rear camera array that features one giant main camera and three additional cameras. While the publication admits taht very little is known about the camera configuration of the S22 Ultra at the time of publication, the company predicts Samsung will use the Exynos 2100 chip that can support 200-megapixel sensors. As such, the giant main camera is presumed to be a 200-megapixel and will be combined with an ultra-wide and two telephotos.

Render of Samsung Galaxy S22 Renews Olympus Partnership Speculation 52

The full report on LetsGoDigital discusses other features that it thinks might make its way into the new Galaxy S22 Ultra, but this is the second render that points to a giant main camera among a group in the large camera notch. It remains to be seen if this comes to pass.


Image credits: Renders by TechnizoConcept and shared with permission from LetsGoDigital.

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