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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 4 September 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 4 September 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Arboretum

© Phillbri

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to Phillbri (Day 29 – Arboretum) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 24

Market Stalls

 

Day 25

Motion

Stormforce Flow

 

Day 26

Good Weather’

 

Day 27

Mountain Landscapes

Nordfjellet, Lofoten Islands

 

Day 28

Forests

Keeping Fit

 

Day 30

Autumn Close-Ups

 

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Slideshow: Photos Of The Day For September 2021

Slideshow: Photos Of The Day For September 2021

Did you miss a Photo Of The Day last month? View all of September’s selections in the slideshow below.

Each Photo of The Day is chosen from our Your Work gallery and Contests and is featured on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Visit the galleries to submit your best photos and gain inspiration from the Digital Photo Pro magazine community.

“Look At Me” By Ruth Ferrell

Slideshow: Photos Of The Day For September 2021 1
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Originally Published September 24, 2021

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Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 2

Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


How Dorothea Lange Reimagined Protest Photography by Quietly Documenting Life Inside Japanese Internment Camps – Forbes

Pledge of Allegiance, Raphael Weill Elementary School, San Francisco; Dorothea Lange (American, 1895 - 1965); San Francisco, California, United States; negative April 20, 1942; print about 1960s; Gelatin silver print; 34 × 25.6 cm (13 3/8 × 10 1/16 in.); 2000.50.16; No Copyright - United States (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/)
Pledge of Allegiance, Raphael Weill Elementary School, San Francisco, negative April 20, 1942; print about 1960s Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965) Gelatin silver print 34 × 25.6 cm (13 3/8 × 10 1/16 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

In April 1942, photographer Dorothea Lange was commissioned by the US Government to photograph a Japanese American girl reciting the pledge of allegiance at a school in San Francisco.

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 3
Fight Like a Girl, Los Angeles, negative 2019; print 2020 John Simmons (American, born 1950) Pigment print 24.1 × 38.1 cm (9 1/2 × 15 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles © John Simmons.

Americans of Japanese ancestry had already been moved to concentration camps as President Roosevelt doubted that he could trust them during World War II.

American Flag; Robert Mapplethorpe (American, 1946 - 1989); New York, New York, United States; 1977; Gelatin silver print; 35.3 × 35.3 cm (13 7/8 × 13 7/8 in.); 2011.7.6; In Copyright (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/)
American Flag, 1977 Robert Mapplethorpe (American, 1946-1989) Gelatin silver print 35.3 × 35.3 cm (13 7/8 × 13 7/8 in.) Jointly acquired by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the David Geffen Foundation © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

“The majority of photographs are politically impactful but conceptually conventional,” writes Forbes. “For instance, Bruce Davidson captured the brave faces of the young black men who were willing to risk bodily injury to demonstrate their support for civil rights in the deep south.

“The conceptual basis and visual language of Dorothea Lange’s photograph are more ambiguous because she was working for a president she admired, who’d enacted a system she deplored.

Lange’s photographs – which also documented the harshness of life inside the internment camps – were disturbing enough for the military to censor them and for the government to stash them in the National Archives, where they remained unseen until the 1970s.

“Her work became protest photography only retrospectively, years after her death.”

In Focus: Protest is on at the Getty Center, Los Angeles, till Oct 10.


The LAPD Tried to Change its Image After Rodney King. Here’s What a Photographer SawNBC News

Murder suspect is arrested as his family watches.
A murder suspect is arrested at the Mar Vista Gardens housing project as his family watches © Joseph Rodriguez

As part of these efforts, the LAPD gave Brooklyn-born documentary photographer Joseph Rodriguez unprecedented access to document the officers in the field for The New York Times, hoping to give the public an image of a “kinder, gentler cop,” as the headline put it.

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 4
Officers at the Rampart Station restrain a man resisting arrest © Joseph Rodriguez

In the photo above, an arresting officer casually kneels on the neck of a suspect who has already been handcuffed while he watches his partner restrain his legs. Before Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin kneeled on George Floyd’s neck resulting in his death, most people had no idea that such a tactic was even used. Looking at the photo from 20 years ago, it seems to have been a common practice.

Rampart Division Officers detaining an arrested woman.
A handcuffed woman is detained and booked at Rampart Station © Joseph Rodriguez

The Kodachrome photos in LAPD 1994 display the subjectivity of Rodriguez as much as that of the cops and the civilians, who are the victims and sometimes perpetrators of violence – he is not afraid to humanize the cops, but the images also show the darker side of both the officers and the people they are sworn to protect.


North Carolina Film-Maker’s Copyright Case Against the State Revived After Supreme Court Denial – The Art Newspaper

A district court will now consider whether state officials unjustly took Rick Allen’s footage of a pirate ship salvage operation.

Also:
State Copyright Plunder is Bad and Getting Worse – Real Clear


‘I Believe it’s a Mental Health Issue’: the Rise of Zoom DysmorphiaThe Guardian

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 5
Depositphotos

The effects of staring at ourselves for hours during video conference calls have resulted in a breakdown of how we perceive our own self-image.

The phenomenon has been nicknamed “Zoom dysmorphia” by Harvard Medical School Professor Dr. Shadi Kourosh, who has noticed an increase in appointment requests for appearance-related issues during the pandemic.

“I was concerned that the time spent on these cameras was negatively affecting people’s perceptions of their appearance,” she tells The Guardian.

Kourosh feels that video conference via phone camera is like a “funhouse mirror” rather than a true reflection of themselves. Participants do not realize that their faces are being distorted by wide angle lenses and how close they are to the camera.


On Set with Photographer Mary Ellen Mark – Criterion

From Criterion:
When the photographer Mary Ellen Mark died in 2015 at age seventy-five, she left behind a vast and varied five-decade trail of portraits and documentary pictures, collected in twenty books and dozens of exhibitions… Most of her work was shot in black and white and originated from magazine assignments …

This was true whether Mark was embedded with Mother Teresa working in her missions in Calcutta, a troubled family living out of their car in Los Angeles, residents of an Oregon psychiatric ward, underage sex workers in India, animals and circus performers, child beauty pageant contestants, or the young runaways in Seattle whom she would continue to work with in what became one of her best-known projects, the books Streetwise (1988) and Tiny: Streetwise Revisited (2015)…

For those whose introduction to Mark’s work came via the Streetwise books, it’s perhaps a discovery to learn that her favorite director was Federico Fellini, or that a significant body of her work was made on film sets … of at least 140 films, from Fellini Satyricon to the Coen brothers’ remake of True Grit.


What Is the Resolution of The Eye?


I Traded My Full-Frame Kit for A Sony RX100 VI. Here’s What I Learned – LensRentals 

This is the story of that time Mathew Saville, an obsessed pixel-peeper, decided to leave all his exotic full-frame cameras and lenses at home and instead bring a Sony RX100 VI on a week-long backpacking trip in the High Sierra of California.


Polaroid Now: The History and Future of Polaroid PhotographyFlaunt

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 6
Andy Warhol taking a photo with a Polaroid camera © Oliviero Toscani. Photo courtesy Chronicle Books.

“Polaroid is one of the few companies in the world that can truly say it invented magic,” says Polaroid CEO Oskar Smolokowski in the foreword to Polaroid Now: The History and Future of Polaroid Photography published by Chronicle Books.

#41 on PDF David Lekach, 300 Polaroids
© David Lekach, 300 Polaroids. Photo courtesy Chronicle Books.

And that magic still exists 74 years after Edwin Land first presented his new camera and film to an amazed audience.

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 7
© Harriet Browse, Untitled (left), Harriet Browse, Untitled (right). Photo courtesy Chronicle Books.

The curated selection of 200 Polaroid images features renowned luminaries such as Andy Warhol, David Hockney, and Chuck Close, as well as a section on the 20×24 Polaroid camera. The book cover design mimics a vintage Polaroid Colorpack Film box.


Through the Lens: Yoshirotten x Daido Moriyama – Hypebeast

Daido Moriyama (b. 1938) has captured street photography of his native Japan for over 50 years. He has used a compact film camera and created contrasty and grainy images as his signature style with little regard for the technical aspects of photography.

Yoshirotten is one of Tokyo’s most active graphic artists and an interdisciplinary artist known for his retro-futuristic pieces.

Yoshirotten has injected his signature distorted elements across a handful of Daido’s grainy images of Shinjuku, Tokyo, which will be released as prints.


Fox Talbot’s Cache of Ghostly Monument Photographs – Museum Crush

http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/282007
The Tomb of Sir Walter Scott, in Dryburgh Abbey, 1844 William Henry Fox Talbot, salted paper print from a paper negative, Public Domain

Henry Fox Talbot’s photographs of some of Britain’s most famous monuments remain the earliest photographs ever taken of London and Edinburgh.

Talbot, an important player in the invention of modern photography, made a two-week photographic trip to Scotland in October 1844. Many of these studies appeared in what has often been referred to as the first illustrated monograph, Sun Pictures of Scotland, which he issued in 1845.

Talbot made 100 copies, which were available by subscription, with Queen Victoria among the subscribers. Today about 20 copies still survive, but most of them are badly faded from their original rich brown tones to a ghostly hue owing to lack of fixing and washing.

Look at this copy in the Met Museum collection (above) to see it in its original form.


Want Better Selfies? Your iPhone Already Has This Front Camera Trick – CNET

One small camera feature on your iPhone may make the biggest difference for your selfie needs: a setting called Mirror Front Camera.

Mirror Front Camera comes after the iPhone 11‘s “slofie” slow-motion selfie feature to bring us a subtler — and more useful — selfie tool.


Male-Centric and Whitewashed: Major Photography Brands Fuji, Canon and Kodak Scramble to Diversify Following Criticism – The Art Newspaper

Fuji, Canon and Kodak have each pledged to support more diverse photographers after receiving a barrage of criticism from activists over their allegedly male-centric and whitewashed ambassador programs and Instagram accounts.


Peter Bunnell, Eminent Scholar of Photography and an ‘Essential’ Figure in the University Art Museum, Dies at 83 – Princeton University

How Peter C. Bunnell, Shaped the Photography World — Aperture


Photographers Workspaces – ShotKit

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 8
Mark Condon’s work shed from where he produces Shotkit

The life of a photographer has many glamorous moments… but it must be said – the hours spent editing behind a desk are not among them!

That’s why having a good workspace is so important. If you’re looking for inspiration on how to set up or improve your own photography workspace, look no further: below are the workspaces of 39 professional photographers from around the world.


How ‘Flying Dress’ Photos Became so Popular on Social Media – CNN Travel

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 9
A woman in a red “flying dress” poses in Santorini, Greece Depositphotos

These Instagram-worthy images, known as “flying dress” photos, started out on the picturesque Greek island of Santorini and have since become popular in other tourist spots like Dubai and Italy.

While the pictures look like they could have been taken for a high fashion magazine, the photoshoots are relatively affordable. They have become a more common offering on travel experience booking websites like Viator and Klook.


What Is Infrared Photography? A Beginner’s Guide — MUO

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 10
Depositphotos

While not exactly the way to go if your aim is to paint a picture of the world as we know it, infrared pictures offer a glimpse into what feels like an alternate version of reality. To some, this may be a welcome and refreshing deviation from the ordinary.


Photo Basel, Switzerland’s First and Only Photo Show is Back – The Guardian

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 11
Camo 5 Kopie, Thandiwe Muriu, Image courtesy of the artist and 193 Gallery, Paris and Photo Basel.

Switzerland’s first and only art fair dedicated to photography is back with vivid images of fairytales, fabrics and firepower.

Great Reads in Photography: September 26, 2021 12
Mozambique 1975-1985, Moira Forjaz (Zimbabwe-born 1942), Image courtesy of the artist and AKKA Project, Venice (Italy) & Dubai (UAE) and Photo Basel.
Nikita Teryoshin – „Nothing Personal –the back office of war“ (2016 - ongoing) Zwischen 2016 und 2019 steigen die globalen Rüstungsausgaben kontinuierlich an, brechen neue Rekorde, während Bomben in zahlreichen Konflikten fallen. Durch den globalen Rechtsruck in der Politik bekommt Militarismus zudem starken Rückenwind. In dieser Zeit werfe ich einen Blick hinter die Kulissen des globalen Waffenhandels, auf exklusive Rüstungsmessen, nur für Fachpublikum zugänglich, wo sich das Who is Who der Industrie und Politik trifft und milliardenschwere Deals abgeschlossen werden. Im schlimmsten Fall landen die Waffen am Ende über Umwege bei Diktatoren und werden zum Beispiel gegen das eigene Volk eingesetzt. Das Langzeitprojekt „Nothing Personal“ zeigt das „Backoffice of War“, welches das totale Gegenteil eines Schlachtfeldes darstellt. Ein überdimensioniertes Spielfeld für Ewachsene mit Bier, Wein, Häppchen und frisch polierten Waffen. Tote Körper hier sind Mannequins oder Pixel auf Bildschirmen einer Vielzahl von lebensechten Kriegssimulatoren. Schlachten werden inmitten künstlicher Kulissen inszeniert und von vollen Rängen mit Generälen, PolitikerInnen, Staatsoberhäuptern und Geschäftsleuten beklatscht. „NextGen Lethality“ und „70 Years Defending Peace“, so lauten die Slogans von den Global Playern Rheinmetall und Kalashnikow. In meiner Arbeit werden bewusst keine Gesichter gezeigt. Es soll um das System an sich gehen und nicht um einzelne Protagonisten. Bei den anonymisierten Händlern mit Gewehren, Kanonen oder Bomben vor ihren Gesichtern lasse ich mich von John Heartfields Zeichnungen inspirieren, welche er vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg als Warnung an die Welt anfertigte. Es soll auch als Metapher für die Verschwiegenheit der Rüstungsindustrie stehen. Die Bilder entstanden zwischen September 2016 und Oktober 2019 auf fünf Kontinenten in Polen, Weißrussland, Südkorea, Deutschland, Frankreich, Südafrika, China, Abu Dhabi, Per
IDEX Abu Dhabi from the series Nothing Personal 2019, Nikita Teryoshin (Russia-born 1986), Image courtesy of the artist and Galerie Koschmieder, Berlin, Germany and Photo Basel.

Quiz of the Week

1.) How many photos will be taken around the world in 2021?

2.) Did Canon ever make a 400mm f/2 lens?

3.) Are CFexpress Type A cards as fast as Type B cards?

Answers

1.) Last year, in 2020, it was 1,436,300,000,000 photos, and this year in 2021, it is expected to increase by 0.2%. In 2020 the capture devices were:
Tablets                        1.8%
Digital Camera            7.3%
Phones                        90.9%

2.) Yes, but it was only a one-of-a-kind and probably a prototype. Nobody has been able to exactly identify this lens so far.

3.) No. CFexpress Type A cards currently READ at approx. 800 MB/sec, whereas Type B promise a rated READ speed of approx. 1,700 MB/sec. These speeds are from Sony, which manufactures both types of cards.


Why I like This Photo — Jon SooHoo

Los Angeles Dodgers during game against the New York Yankees Sunday, June 27, 2010 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California.© Jon SooHoo/Los Angeles Dodgers 2010
Derek Jeter, Dodger Stadium, New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, June 27, 2010 © Jon SooHoo

I like this photo because of the timeliness of all of my worlds colliding at this moment. Standing next to Sports Illustrated Photographer Robert Beck in the fourth inning, he offered me a chance to use his Nikon 8-15mm f/3.5-4.5E EDIF AF-S fisheye lens while we were standing in the inside first photo well at Dodger Stadium next to the visiting Yankees dugout and on deck circle.

I had just clicked the lens onto my Nikon D3 when future Yankee Hall of Famer Derek Jeter climbed up the dugout steps towards the on-deck circle. Suddenly, he looked back into the dugout and, I was able to see both eyes, and I fired away.

The American League Yankees rarely visit the National League Dodgers unless in the World Series, so shooting this future Hall of Famer in this situation outside the lines back in 2010 made for a fun weekend series of extremely historical teams.

As sports photography goes and shooting endless amounts of games per season as the team photographer of the Dodgers, I can’t say I honestly look at my images as closely as those who look at framed photos on walls in galleries. Usually, the edit is quick, and the captions need to be specific and accurate as to who is in it and all of the game details. I definitely appreciate it now more than when I took it. I love the round look of this image, especially since it was my first time trying on a circular fisheye lens.

Jon SooHoo is a fifth-generation Chinese American photographer born and raised in Los Angeles and has been covering sports in Los Angeles for over 40 years. He is the long-time team photographer for the Los Angeles Dodgers and has been photographing them since 1985. He has continued to freelance for United Press International since the early ’90s covering the NBA, NFL, and all other major domestic sporting events in the US. He currently lives in Manhattan Beach, California.


Quote of the Week – Bruce Davidson

March from Selma, Selma, Alabama; Bruce Davidson (American, born 1933); Selma, Alabama, United States; negative 1965; print 1980–2010; Gelatin silver print; 21.7 × 32.8 cm (8 9/16 × 12 15/16 in.); 2018.40.9; In Copyright (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/)
March from Selma, Alabama, negative 1965; printed later Bruce Davidson (American, born 1933) Gelatin silver print 21.7 × 32.8 cm (8 9/16 × 12 15/16 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles © Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos. Photo courtesy In Focus: Protest at the Getty Center, Los Angeles, till Oct 10.

Most of my pictures are compassionate, gentle and personal. They tend to let the viewer see for himself. They tend not to preach. And they tend not to pose as art. – Bruce Davidson


To see an archive of past issues of Great Reads in Photography, click here.


We welcome comments as well as suggestions. As we cannot possibly cover each and every source, if you see something interesting in your reading or local newspaper anywhere in the world, kindly forward the link to us here. ALL messages will be personally acknowledged.


About the author: Phil Mistry is a photographer and teacher based in Atlanta, GA. He started one of the first digital camera classes in New York City at The International Center of Photography in the 90s. He was the director and teacher for Sony/Popular Photography magazine’s Digital Days Workshops. You can reach him via email here.


Image credits: All photographs as credited and used with permission from the photographers or agencies. Portions of header photo via Depositphotos.

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Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021 13

Every day, the PetaPixel Instagram account is sharing excellent photography from our readers and those who inspire us. Here is a look at some of our recent favorite posts and the photographers behind the lens.

Our @PetaPixel Instagram page has been posting all the great work that finds its way in front of our eyes. Want to see your photos shared on our account? First, you’ll want to follow us. Then use the #petapixel hashtag in your posts to join our Instagram community of photographers. These steps let us easily find what to share.

Below, we recognize a selection of talented photographers who recently had their work featured on @PetaPixel. Keep posting your images with #petapixel and you could find yourself here next week.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021 14

Felix Wesch is a 40-year-old photographer living in Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, and can be found simply as @felixwesch on Instagram. “Usually I only take pictures close to my home to be as flexible as possible if the weather and light are great, but from time to time I like to travel,” Wesch told PetaPixel. This photo happens to be the result of one of those rarer occasions of travel. “I was waiting for chamois in southern France and had this view.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021 15

Gheorghe Popa is a pharmacist and nature photographer and can be found on Instagram as @gheorghepopaofficial. Popa said that his photographs “create a monument to unique beauty that lies within untouched nature.” He aims to bring responsibility and attention to his viewers and encourage them to cherish and protect these environments. National Geographic, Natuurfotografie Magazine, and Forum Naturfotografie have taken notice and published his fine work.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021 16

Moises Levy, known as @moises_levy_street on Instagram, is an architect and photographer based in Mexico. “I like to freeze special moments,” he said. Levy looks for movements, gestures, funny moments, or hidden messages to photograph. He said that it takes a lot of time searching and waiting for them to come, and they can happen at the least expected time and place.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021 17

Tom and Ute Photography, found on Instagram as @tomutefotografie, are a photographer couple that has been together since the 80s and married for over 20 years. Over the past decade, they have found portrait photography as a calling and work together to further develop their talents.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 24, 2021 18

Dennis Maida, or @dennismaidaphotography on Instagram, is a landscape, astro, and portrait photographer from New Jersey. “I became interested in photography as a means to cope with PTSD after my deployment to Iraq in 2007 with the U.S. Navy,” Maida told PetaPixel. “I recently started The f/22 Project to help veterans with PTSD heal through the art of photography.”


Be sure to follow us on Instagram to see more work from photographers like you and tag photos with #petapixel for them to be considered for a feature.


Image credits: All photographs used with the permission of their respective photographers.

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 3 September 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 3 September 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Duck Splash On Water

© JonnyNI

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to JonnyNI (Day 21 – Ducks) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 17

Night Architecture

Shanghai Old City (III)

 

Day 18

Cats

Focused

 

Day 19

Textures

 

Day 20

Safari

 

Day 22

River

Kayaker

 

Day 23

Mist/Fog

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 September 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 September 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Light Bulb

© altitude50

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to altitude50 (Day 14 – Lights) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 9

Bridges In The Landscape

Bridge

 

Day 10

Music Photography

 

Day 11

Shopping

 

Day 12

City Skylines

 

Day 13

Stairs & Steps

Tricky Descent

 

Day 15

High Up

Tower of London

 

Day 16

Rugged Landscape

The Glyders

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Posted on Leave a comment

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 19

Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!


With Baby Animals, Patience Pays: Photographer Describes New Book of Intimate Portraits – Mongabay

Koala Phascolarctos cinereus Eight-month-old baby on mother's back Queensland, Australia *Captive
Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus, eight-month-old baby on mother’s back, Queensland, Australia © Suzi Eszterhas

Suzi Eszterhas was recently named Outstanding Nature Photographer of the Year by the North American Nature Photography Association. Her latest book New on Earth: Baby Animals in the Wild, showcases her specialty of photographing wild animal babies.

Eszterhas’ images have graced over 100 covers from TIME to Smithsonian, BBC Wildlife, The New York Times, and Ranger Rick. She has 21 books in print, including in French and Japanese, and another three in the works.

Hoffmann's Two-toed Sloth Choloepus hoffmanni Mother and two-month-old baby Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary, Costa Rica *Rescued and released by Sloth Sanctuary
Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth, Choloepus hoffmanni, mother and two-month-old baby, Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary, Costa Rica © Suzi Eszterhas

She has hugged a baby whale, swam with sloths, fended off curious grizzly bears, had hyenas chew on her engine, had insects lay eggs in her feet, has been chased by a green mamba, and hand-raised and released an orphaned serval, a North African wild cat

5-Minute Sunday Interview

Phil Mistry: What is the secret to getting intimate photos of mothers and babies in the wild?

Suzi Eszterhas: Photography isn’t the hard part. It’s the respectful connection with an animal that is the real work. Nearly all animals with newborns can be wary and on high alert. You must try and understand what you might do (or not do) to make the mother feel safe.

Lion Panthera leo 7-8 week old cub(s) approaching adult male Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya
Lion, Panthera leo, 7-8 week old cub(s) approaching adult male, Masai Mara Reserve, Kenya © Suzi Eszterhas

This cannot be undertaken on a brief holiday safari. It can take weeks or months of working from sunrise to sunset. My goal is to cultivate a presence where the animal is so relaxed around me that they may not even care that I am there. I just become a piece of the landscape—a part of their habitat.

PM: What attracts you to animal babies?

SE: In a word, they are irresistibly cute. Cute has incredible power to arouse compassion and love.

Nothing gives me greater pleasure than knowing that my imagery can inspire someone to love and take action, care for our planet, or help save an endangered species.

Brown Bear Ursus arctos 3-4 month old triplet cubs climbing on mother's back as she cools off in water Katmai National Park, AK
(Left) Brown bear, Ursus arctos, 3–4-month-old triplet cubs climbing on mother’s back as she cools off in the water, Katmai National Park, AK. (Right) African Elephant, Loxodonta africana, young calf (less than three weeks old), Masai Mara Conservancy, Kenya. © Suzi Eszterhas

PM: In the last 24 years, you are only the second woman named Outstanding Nature Photographer of the Year.  Why is there a shortage of women in the field of wildlife photography?

SE: There is actually no smoking gun. There are a number of reasons why there are so few professional female wildlife photographers. Some of the reasons include: sexism in the industry, the lack of female role models, gear being marketed to men, cultural beliefs about parental responsibilities, personal safety issues, and the highly competitive nature of this field. The non-profit that I founded in 2017, Girls Who Click, is working hard to change this.

PM: What were a few of your scary moments?

SE: Sadly, most of them involve humans rather than wild animals. I once was grabbed off the street and thrown into a vehicle but fought my way out of it and managed to get away. And in Africa, I had a group of drunk rangers show up at midnight and try to arrest me for “poaching.” As a woman often working alone, I always have to consider personal safety issues.

PM: What is your gear?

SE: I shoot a Canon 1DX Mark III and a variety of different lenses, everything from a fisheye to the Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM. I am also a huge fan of Mindshift’s First Light bags.

PM: What is your favorite place (or region) to shoot in? 

SE: Africa. When I was little, I literally dreamed of living in Africa in a tent. I did this for years as an adult, and to this day, I go to Africa a few times a year. People say Africa gets in your blood, and I believe this is true. For me, it is a wildlife paradise. Still, I also think this must be tied to our evolutionary connection to the continent because many, many travelers will feel this way even after just one trip to Africa. In the photo tours, I lead to Africa, I see this happen all the time with my clients.

PM: Any other thoughts?

SE: I truly believe that this job is more than collecting pretty pictures and that wildlife photographers have a responsibility to use their imagery to create change. One of the few things that I am truly proud of in my life is the work I have done for conservation. I use my imagery to raise awareness and funds for a handful of non-profits I have chosen to partner with, like the Sloth Conservation Foundation, Sumatran Orangutan Society and Wildlife Conservation Network. Over the years, through direct sales of my books, prints, and photo tours, I have managed to raise over $200,000 for conservation. A large portion of the proceeds of New on Earth published by Insight Editions goes to the Wildlife Conservation Network.


Roger’s* Recommended Reading

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 20

*Dr. Roger Cicala is an anesthesiologist (yes, he’s an MD), a photo enthusiast, and the founder of Lens Rentals, but these days you are more likely to find him on a beach.

Editor’s note: If you want to recommend your reading list (current or old articles), email it to us and we’ll also link it to your site.

Félix Nadar: The World’s First Celebrity Photographer — BBC

A nice presentation of Nadar, who was the first great marketer in photography, and a whole lot more.

The Making of a DaguerreotypeDaguerreian Society

Warning: Do not use this brochure to actually attempt the making of a daguerreotype. The chemical procedure is far too dangerous for the incomplete information provided here.

And Edgerton Said, “Let There Be Light.” – LensRentals

Fun with Color VisionLensRentals

Six Optical Aberrations That Could be Impacting Your Vision System — Teledyne Lumenera


9/11 Changed Me | Opinion – NJ.com

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 21
Self-portrait of then The Star-Ledger photographer Aristide Economopoulos taken in the bathroom of the Chase Bank located at Fulton and Broadway Streets, where volunteers urged me to wash the ash off my face. I was shocked at my reflection. I dropped the water and decided to document what I saw in a self-portrait. What bothered me was why was I smiling? This was a tragic event and I have this nervous, crazed smile. First, I thought I looked bizarre. Then, after talking with a therapist, family and friends, I realized that I was also smiling because I was happy to be alive. © Aristide Economopoulos / The Star-Ledger

Aristide Economopoulos writes in NJ.com:

When I look at the photos taken that day, they still bother me. Clearly, it’s because your brain wants to push out traumatic events to protect you. There’s a photo of me running taken by Joe Tabacca, and it’s hard to believe it’s me. It looks like a movie still from some bad action movie.

In my self-portrait, I don’t recognize myself. It is clearly me, but I see someone who is numb, nervous, scared and happy to still be alive at the same time. I was across the street from the North Tower when it started to fall, and if it wasn’t for a big bus parked nearby where Joe and I dove next to, we would have been killed.


Amon Carter Museum Acquires Expansive Collection of Finis Welch — Patron

Edward Steichen (1879–1973) Dana, France, 1923 Gelatin silver print L2020.102.217
Edward Steichen (1879–1973), Dana, France, 1923, gelatin silver print, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of Finis Welch, © 2021 The Estate of Edward Steichen / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art (the Carter) has acquired more than 240 photographs from collector Finis Welch, who passed away in 2020. The gift includes prints by Ansel Adams, Edward Steichen, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Edward Weston, and more, which significantly strengthen the Carter’s ability to tell the story of early photographic modernism in America.

Mitch Epstein (b. 1952) BP Carson Refinery, California 2007, 2006-2007 Chromogenic Print
Mitch Epstein (b. 1952), BP Carson Refinery, California 2007, 2006-07, chromogenic print, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of Finis Welch, © Black River Productions, Ltd. / Mitch Epstein. Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York

The bequest features ten rare vintage works by Paul Outerbridge and a unique 10-print set of Aaron Siskind’s heralded series Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation, as well as key works by Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and William Eggleston—including some of the rarest and important examples of his photographs, which transform the Carter into a resource for Eggleston scholarship.

Edward Weston (1886–1958) Tina Modotti, n.d. L2020.102.261
Edward Weston (1886–1958), Tina Modotti, 1921, platinum or platinum/palladium, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of Finis Welch, © 1981 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents
William Klein (b. 1928) Antonia + Yellow Taxi, New York, 1962 Chromogenic Print L2020.102.140
William Klein (b. 1928), Antonia + Yellow Taxi, New York, 1962, chromogenic print, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of Finis Welch, © William Klein

Conceptual works by Marco Breuer, Chris McCaw, and Alison Rossiter are the first works by these artists to enter the Carter’s collection. Works by Edward Burtynsky, Mitch Epstein, and Richard Misrach expand the Carter’s premier collection of American landscape photography.


The Awe-Inspiring Drone Photography of Gary Cummins – DroneDJ

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 22
From The Abandoned Series © Gary Cummins

Gary Cummins combines milky way photos with abandoned houses.

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 23
Buildings in Hong Kong © Gary Cummins

“We introduce lots of noise in our images in astrophotography shoots, and I’ve been trying to find new ways of eliminating that,” Cummins describes his technical aspects to DroneDJ. “So, I started light painting old houses and barns with my drone. This allowed me to shoot with much lower ISO settings and get cleaner images all around.

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 24
Container ship, San Francisco © Gary Cummins
Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 25
Downpatrick Head, Ireland © Gary Cummins

“It does come with its hazards, though. Flying at night can be tricky as the drone’s sensors cannot see, and it’s also tricky flying around trees.”

Disclaimer: We are not endorsing these techniques, and please keep your drone flying compliant with local laws.


The Celebrity Photographer Who Refuses to Photoshop Movie Icons — CNN

Celebrity British portrait photographer Andy Gotts works with an analog camera and no crew. His portraits are never retouched, unveiling actors’ “facescapes” with all their wrinkles, blemishes and smiles. It’s a style that has remained essentially unchanged since he first started.

“If you see a pimple on someone’s head, or a hair out of place — that’s because that’s how they were, sitting in front of me,” Gotts tells CNN. “I was capturing that moment when they sat down with me for our conversation.”


Black Lives in the American South – in Pictures – The Guardian

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 26
© Tyler Mitchell, photo courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery

Tyler Mitchell’s imagery visualizes scenes of peace, solitude and belonging for Black people in the pastoral American South. Mitchell makes images that explore the histories of intimacy and meanings of home within Black communities.

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 27
© Tyler Mitchell, photo courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery

During the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, Mitchell could not see his family in his native state of Georgia. The distance and isolation led him to start dreaming of home. When he was able to return, he created new images of subjects in the Atlanta metro area that consider historical and contemporary notions of refuge, repose, and rootedness.

Dreaming in Real Time and I Can Make You Feel Good are on view at Jack Shainman Gallery till Oct. 30.


Canon EOS R3 vs. Canon EOS R5: 9 Key Differences Between the Mirrorless Beasts – TechRadar

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 28

1.) Sensor: a new stacked chip takes the Canon EOS R3’s speed up a notch

2.) Connectivity: the R3 offers super-fast transmission for the professional user

Check the link above for seven more differences and complete details.


Dan Winters (The Most COMPLETE Photographer Since Irving Penn?)

Read also: Dan Winters Gives an Emotional Talk on Shooting the Final Space Shuttle Launches


To Remember the Moment, Try Taking Fewer Photos — NPR

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 29
Depositphotos

Snapping too many pictures could actually harm the brain’s ability to retain memories, says Elizabeth Loftus, a psychological science professor at the University of California, Irvine. So, you get the photo, but kind of lose the memory.

“When people rely on technology to remember something for them, they’re essentially outsourcing their memory,” Linda Henkel, a psychology professor at Fairfield University, tells NPR. “They know their camera is capturing that moment for them, so they don’t pay full attention to it in a way that might help them remember.”


A Photographer Gives an Inside Look at the Fall of Kabul, her Longtime HomeNational Geographic

Photographer Kiana Hayeri has lived in Kabul for the past seven years. For National Geographic, she chronicled the changes across Afghanistan as a generation born under relative freedom faces a future under Taliban control.

Kabul is her home. But on Sunday, August 15, the day the Taliban seized Kabul, and the Afghan government fell, Hayeri had to evacuate as women in the country faced an uncertain future under the Taliban.


The Fifth Corner: Expanding the Frame – Magnum

Fred Ritchin, Dean Emeritus of the International Center of Photography, on this era of uncertainty “when the contributions of image-makers may have little impact or serve primarily to confuse and further fracture the social fabric.”


The Met Museum Is Deaccessioning $1 Million Worth of Photos and Prints to Fill a Revenue Shortfall Caused by the Pandemic — ArtNet

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will sell 219 prints and photographs to help plug a $150 million revenue shortfall resulting from the pandemic.


What are the Legal Rights of Deceased Black Americans – The Atlantic

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 30
Renty an African slave, subject of Louis Agassiz, 1865, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

This fall, the Massachusetts Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case against Harvard over its ownership of two 1850 daguerreotypes of enslaved people.

Tamara Lanier believes that the two people in the playing card-sized daguerreotypes held by Harvard University are her great-great-great-grandfather and his daughter.

Read also:
Judge Rules Images of Enslaved Are Property of Harvard, Not Descendant
Who Should Own Photos of Enslaved People?
Harvard Sued Over Profiting from Its Earliest Slave Photos from 1850
AI’ Deep Nostalgia’ Images Have Deep Limitations


How to Tell If You Have a Good or Bad Copy of a Lens – Photography Life

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 31
Depositphotos

The biggest issue that differentiates a good vs. bad copy of a lens is decentering. In other words, one or more elements in the lens are tilted or off-center, which can lead to blurriness in some areas of the frame. The process in this article is designed to figure out whether your lens is decentered. Also, keep in mind that no lens is perfect.


Joke of the Week

A press photographer is assigned to cover wildfires. However, the thick smoke was staying close to the ground, so he could not get any decent photos.

The photographer calls his assignment editor and asks him to rent a plane for just 30 minutes. He soon receives a confirmation that a small Cessna is waiting for him at a rural airport 10 miles away and that he should hurry.

On arriving at the airport, the photographer spots the plane waiting for him with the propeller whirring. He jumps in and tells the pilot to take off immediately in the direction he is pointing. When they are directly above the fires, he tells the pilot to fly first east-west and then north-south and then circle the area for the next 20 minutes.

The pilot seems very confused at this instruction and asks, coughing from the smoke, “Why are we doing this?”

“Cause, I’m a Press Photographer, and I need to get a good cover photo of the damage for tomorrow’s paper,” replies the photographer while busily looking through the viewfinder.

The pilot is dead silent for five seconds and then stammers, “So, er, you… you are not the flight instructor?”


Photo of the Week

Embed from Getty Images


Great Read from the Past – 2014

Cartier-Bresson’s Classic is Back – but his Decisive Moment has Passed – The Guardian

It’s the book that changed photography forever. But why republish The Decisive Moment after 62 years, when it cements such out-of-date ideas?


Quiz of the Week

1.) Which was the first portable flash to offer HSS (High-speed sync)? Hint: It was way back in 1992 and was made for film cameras by a camera manufacturer.

2.) Canon was the first to use a CMOS sensor in the full frame 1Ds in Sep. 2002. The debut of the Nikon D3 and Sony a700 in mid-2007 firmly cemented CMOS as the dominant technology for photographic cameras — not surprisingly, this same year, CMOS sales surpassed CCD sales. When did the CMOS sensor arrive in the medium format world?

3.) According to Canon: The first full-frame, back-illuminated stacked CMOS image sensor in the EOS R3 will deliver substantially faster read-out speeds and produce much lower __________ distortion than previous EOS models.

4.) Which of the new iPhone 13 models have sensor-shift optical image stabilization (OIS)?

Answers

1.) Nikon SB-25

2.) Hasselblad H5D-50c in 2014

3.) “rolling shutter”

4.) All of them


Why I Like This Photo — Peter Cavanagh

Great Reads in Photography: September 19, 2021 32
© Peter Cavanagh

I like this photo because these birds are my neighbors having an unusual day. Over the last several years, I have taken hundreds of images of this pair of bald eagles. In all this time, there has never been a really significant snowfall on Lopez Island, Washington, in the Salish Sea where I live.

On February 13, 2021, enough snow fell to make many local roads impassable on this mid-pandemic day. So, I set off on foot in search of an image. I was carrying a micro four thirds mirrorless Olympus OMD M1X with an Olympus M. Zuiko ED 300mm F/4.0 IS Pro lens — which gave me a full-frame equivalent of 600mm and a published seven stops of image stabilization. I am actually now a Sony Alpha 1 convert.

I found this pair on the top of a large Douglas fir that was heavy from the constant snowfall. They were surveying the bewildering white landscape, surely wondering why their usual green and brown habitat had changed.

Post-processing was in Topaz DeNoise AI and Lightroom. As I viewed the image on the screen, it became clear that the tree was as much a subject as the birds. The entire span of the upper branch needed to be in the final crop, and this determined the composition. The birds seem like sentinels on a ship moving through a sea of grey; one looking east, the other west in reflected symmetry. To escape the sea of grey, the viewer’s eye is magnetically drawn to their yellow bills, tools of destruction, symbols of dominance.

The shot was handheld: 1/2500 sec, f/4, ISO 800. The fast shutter speed was in anticipation of a flight shot that didn’t materialize as the birds exited the backside of the tree.

Peter Cavanagh is a Pacific Northwest wildlife photographer and author who can usually be found pointing his lens towards birds. He has been taking photographs since he was a boy of five growing up in England. His recently completed book 100 Flying Birds: A Photographer’s Notebook will be published this year. Cavanagh guest-curated the Exhibit How Birds Fly at the Seattle Museum of Flight.


Quote of the Week

William Eggleston (b. 1939) Memphis (Tricycle), ca. 1970 Dye transfer print L2020.102.81
William Eggleston (b. 1939), Untitled, ca. 1970, dye transfer print, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of Finis Welch, © Eggleston Artistic Trust, Courtesy Eggleston Artistic Trust and David Zwirner. Beauty and Life: The Finis Welch Collection will be on view at Amon Carter Museum of American Art from Feb 20–May 8, 2022.

It quickly came to be that I grew interested in photographing whatever was there wherever I happened to be. For any reason.* – William Eggelston

From an interview in The Guardian, Jul 2004.

“I had an old Canon and a Leica,” he says, “but I didn’t know the first thing about photography. Never learnt it off anybody either. It quickly came to be that I grew interested in photographing whatever was there wherever I happened to be. For any reason.”


To see an archive of past issues of Great Reads in Photography, click here.


We welcome comments as well as suggestions. As we cannot possibly cover each and every source, if you see something interesting in your reading or local newspaper anywhere in the world, kindly forward the link to us here. ALL messages will be personally acknowledged.


About the author: Phil Mistry is a photographer and teacher based in Atlanta, GA. He started one of the first digital camera classes in New York City at The International Center of Photography in the 90s. He was the director and teacher for Sony/Popular Photography magazine’s Digital Days Workshops. You can reach him via email here.


Image credits: All photographs as credited and used with permission from the photographers or agencies. Portions of header photo via Depositphotos, Renty an African slave, subject of Louis Agassiz, 1865, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

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Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021

Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021 33

Every day, the PetaPixel Instagram account is sharing excellent photography from our readers and those who inspire us. Here is a look at some of our recent favorite posts and the photographers behind the lens.

Our @PetaPixel Instagram page has been posting all the great work that finds its way in front of our eyes. Want to see your photos shared on our account? First, you’ll want to follow us. Then use the #petapixel hashtag in your posts to join our Instagram community of photographers. These steps let us easily find what to share.

Below, we recognize a selection of talented photographers who recently had their work featured on @PetaPixel. Keep posting your images with #petapixel and you could find yourself here next week.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021 34

Carim Jost, found on Instagram as @carim_jost, is a 37-year-old amateur photographer based in Switzerland. Jost has a passion for wilderness and adventure and loves sharing the beauty of the mountains as a means of protecting them.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021 35

Dominik Zagarovsky is a fashion and portrait photographer based in Cologne, Germany whose work can be seen on Instagram at @dominikzky. “Mostly I shoot people that are not models and not in some kind of creative industry,” Zagarovsky told PetaPixel. “My goal is creating a connection with them, which makes them feel like being in front of the camera is the most normal thing in the world.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021 36

Matt Kenneally, or @matt_kenneally on Instagram, is a London-based photographer that specializes in time-slices. These time-slices show the passage of time in a single image and take hours to capture all the frames needed.


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021 37

Kevin Kielty, whose main Instagram account is @shakes11, is an amateur photographer living in Southern California. “I focus mainly on surfing photos and wildlife/animals,” Kielty told PetaPixel through email. “And am hoping to move professionally into either field.”

For this particular photo that’s sure to put a smile on your face, he used the Nikon D500 and Nikkor 200-500mm lens. Keilty said it was shot at a spot called The Wedge in Newport Beach, California “on a day when the waves were breaking 15-20 feet.”


Photographers to Follow on Instagram: September 17, 2021 38

Alan Shapiro, known as @alanshapiro515 on Instagram, is a multi-talented photographer who said that he still can’t decide whether he prefers portraiture, food, still life, or macro. Any which way, photography for Shapiro came as a stress-relieving hobby and he “turned it into a joy-filled second career.”


Be sure to follow us on Instagram to see more work from photographers like you and tag photos with #petapixel for them to be considered for a feature.


Image credits: All photographs used with the permission of their respective photographers.

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 September 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 September 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Police

© little0wl 

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to little0wl (Day 3 – Speed) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 1

‘Symmetry’

 

Day 2

Quirky Angles

 

Day 4

Triptych

 

Day 5

Outdoor Macro

Ashy Mining Bee on a Daisy

 

Day 6

Big Cats

 

Day 7

Britain

 

Day 8

Graphic Landscape

Dry Season

 

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16

Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16

Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16 39

Oppo is poised to launch a special edition of its Find X3 Pro smartphone later this week in conjunction with Kodak. Called the “Photographer Edition,” it is expected to kick off a partnership between the two brands.

As spotted by GSMArena, Oppo has revealed that it will officially announce the special edition Find X3 Pro Photographer Edition during a live stream scheduled for September 16 in China. The company announced its plans on Weibo. The Find X3 Pro Photographer Edition is unlikely to make any substantive performance changes to the original Find X3 Pro that was launched in March but will offer a new look and a few other changes to the packaging.

Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16 40

That means the same quad-camera array that features two 10-bit 50-megapixel cameras and the billion-color QHD+ curved display will return, this time with a silver and black finish that is reminiscent of the Kodak 35.

The Kodak 35 was introduced in 1938 and was the first 35mm camera manufactured in the United States and the first camera from the Eastman Kodak Company.

Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16 41
via Weibo

According to some of the official promotional images, the Find X3 Pro Photographer Edition will ship with a protective case that mimics the color and design of the smartphone itself and will ship in a new collector’s box.

Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16 42

Even if Oppo makes no performance changes to the Find X3 Pro in this new edition, that wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing. In PetaPixel’s review of the phone, Andy Boxall called it a great, consistent camera experience that mostly guarantees a good result regardless of which of the four cameras are used.

“The Find X3 Pro is a very desirable, compact, and powerful smartphone with a highly competent camera, which includes features and technology not seen on other phones,” he wrote.

Oppo and Kodak to Co-Launch Smartphone on September 16 43

It’s not clear if Oppo and Kodak plan to do anything more with the partnership beyond the co-branding of smartphones or if it will extend beyond or simply be a one-off. While Zeiss and Hasselblad have teamed up with Vivo and OnePlus for multi-year co-development of camera technologies, Oppo as a brand has not tied itself to a notable camera or lens brand with its smartphone imaging systems (although it and OnePlus were recently merged). That said, Kodak does not have much clout when it comes to the digital space as the company historically focused entirely on film and paper after famously deciding to pass on developing digital cameras back in 1975 despite the first digital camera actually being made behind its walls. While Kodak has made digital camera devices in recent years, the Kodak name doesn’t carry the same clout or expertise that brands like Leica, Hasselblad, Zeiss, and others who have partnered with smartphone brands do.

Kodak’s close ties to the Chinese smartphone company may explain why it was quick to delete a photo from its official Instagram account of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region where the photographer mentioned the mass detentions of the Uyghur people there. Kodak apologized for the publication of the image stating that its Instagram is “not intended to be a platform for political commentary.”

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