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A Brilliant Bear Action Shot Wins Our ‘Photo Of The Week’

A Brilliant Bear Action Shot Wins Our 'Photo Of The Week'

A brown bear running through snow is the subject of our well captured and perfectly timed ‘Photo of the Week’.

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Competitions

Black Bear

 

A black bear that almost looks like it’s running right for the photographer is the captivating subject of our winning ‘Photo of the Week’ (POTW) shot. 

The image was captured by hannukon and we love how dynamic this image is with the huge bear running through the frame. The detail is superb with every strand of fur looking sharp and the bear’s eyes staring right at you. The inclusion of so much background adds scale to the shot as you can see exactly just how large this beautiful mammal is as it moves through the snowy scene. It’s also thrown out of focus just enough for us to recognise the surroundings without it pulling attention away from the bear. What a brilliant photo! 

All of our POTW winners receive a Samsung EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with an SD Adapter courtesy of Samsung. To be in with a chance of becoming our next POTW winner, simply upload an image to our gallery where you’ll also find all of our past POTW winners.

Plus, going forward, we will also announce a new ‘Photo of the Year’ winner who’ll win a Samsung Portable SSD T7. Each POTW winner, 52 in total, will then have their image shared in a new POTW forum where, in January 2022, we will ask you all to hit the ‘like’ button on your favourite images. Then, the ePHOTOzine team will count up the likes and our first ‘Photo of the Year’ winner will be announced.

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This is the World’s First Magazine Cover Shot with Smart Glasses

This is the World's First Magazine Cover Shot with Smart Glasses

This is the World's First Magazine Cover Shot with Smart Glasses 1

British photographer Rankin recently shot the cover of Hunger Magazine with Facebook’s new Ray-Ban Stories, making it the first magazine cover ever captured with smart glasses. It also happens to feature an actress wearing smart glasses.

Facebook and Ray-Ban’s partnership into eyewear launched in early September with the Ray-Bay Stories glasses. These smart glasses launched in 20 different combinations in classic Ray-Ban styles — Wayfarer, Wayfarer Large, Round, and Meteor — and five colors with a range of lenses including clear, sun, transition, and prescription.

The glasses integrate a pair of five-megapixel cameras that Facebook positioned as mainly designed to let the wearer capture everyday moments as they happen from a first-person perspective. In addition to photos, the glasses can also capture up to 30-second videos. The camera can be activated either with the capture button on the glasses themselves or hands-0free via Facebook Assistant voice commands.

At no point were these glasses ever strongly marketed as high-end imaging devices, as clearly five-megapixels is well below even what lower-end smartphones currently offer. Still, that did not seem to deter Rankin.

Facebook tells PetaPixel that the photo is an industry first and new experience for both the photographer and social media brand.

“The November issue brings to life what Ray-Ban Stories can create in the hands, and face, of a professional photographer,” a Facebook representative tells PetaPixel. “Rankin’s photography spotlights how the stylish smart frames, capable of shooting a magazine cover, can seamlessly fit into everyday life.”

The magazine cover, which features British Actress Anya Chalotra who is known for her role as Yennefer of Vengerberg in the fantasy drama series The Witcher on Netflix, was shot in Rankin’s United Kingdom studio. Chalotra is also photographed wearing Ray-Ban Stories on the cover and across the four-page editorial spread available now on newsstands in the UK.

“I like trying new things and this is what I did with Ray-Ban Stories, it’s the first time a cover has been shot using smart glasses as a camera. The glasses are great, and I look forward to seeing what the next generations of Ray-Ban Stories can do,” Rankin says.

The cover is one of several alternative covers that Hunger is running for its Beauty Issue. The full set of cover photos can be seen on Boutique Mags.


Image credits: Magazine cover provided courtesy of Meta.

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NFL Cameraman Takes Ball to the Head, Still Gets His Shot

NFL Cameraman Takes Ball to the Head, Still Gets His Shot

People who work on the field and sidelines of NFL games are often in harm’s way from players crashing around and off the field during plays, but occasionally, it is a flying ball that causes trouble. One veteran cameraman showed off his toughness recently when a Nick Folk field goal came down directly on his head. 

The play happened during the Thursday night game between the Patriots and the Falcons, when Patriots kicker Nick Folk kicked a 53-yard field goal. Cameraman Don Cornelli was set up just behind the uprights to track the ball coming through, and track it he did, all the way to his face. 

Cornelli showed off why he was inducted into the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame earlier this year, shaking off the impact and getting right back to work, even prompting accolades from the announcers. 

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Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS

Dr. Adrian Smith publishes incredibly detailed examinations of insects in motion through his YouTube Channel Ant Lab. While he generally picks backdrops to compliment the colors of his subjects, this time he chose to mimic a more classic look.

His channel has featured a huge assortment of videos featuring a wide range of insects, some in flight, some jumping and shot at a blistering 73,000 frames per second, and others where he looks at specific species, like moths.

Dr. Smith says that he has two goals when he makes insect flight videos. First, he wants to film something new and capture insects in a way he doesn’t think anyone has before. Second, he wants each of the videos to be visually different. He says that usually that is accomplished by experimenting with color in his filming set to complement and highlight the bodies of the insects.

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS 2

But recently, someone sent Dr. Smith a book titled “Borne on the Wind” by Stephen Dalton. Published in 1975, it appears to be the first collection of detailed pictures of insects in unrestrained free flight.

“Photos from that series were seen as such an achievement that one was included on the gold record sent off to space on Voyager,” Dr. Smith tells PetaPixel.

Some photos in the book are composites of multiple frames that show, in many cases, the motion of insects as they move through the air — motion that is provided in spite of the fact they are still images.

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS 3

Dr. Smith found that some of his favorite photos in the book used those multiple exposures of the insects that are isolated against the black background. Using the photos in the book as inspiration, he decided to recreate a similar set but capture the motion in 6,000 frames per second slow-motion video.

“To collect those first images a special flash that could fire at 1/25,000 of a second and an electronic shutter that had an opening time of 1/450 secibd had to be custom made. Nowadays, of course, a Phantom camera filming at 6,000 frames per second does the job of capturing similar image sequences,” he says. “But, I try to honor the incredible effort that was put in to make those amazing first images with the sequences I captured in this video!”

In the video, Dr. Smith showcases eight total insects: the flatid planthopper, Chinese mantis, American bird grasshopper, broad-headed sharpshooter, stink bug, ichneumonid wasp, brown lacewing, and a tiger moth. Below are some freeze-frames from a few of those sequences, provided to PetaPixel by Dr. Smith:

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS 4

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS 5

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS 6

Extraordinary Portraits of Insects in Flight Shot at 6,000 FPS 7

For more from Dr. Smith, make sure to subscribe to his YouTube Channel.

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Cairngorms Red Squirrel Shot Wins ‘Photo Of The Week’

Cairngorms Red Squirrel Shot Wins 'Photo Of The Week'

A beautiful wildlife and nature themed image featuring a cute Red Squirrel has been crowned our ‘Photo of the Week’.

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Competitions

Red Squirrel

 

A Red Squirrel perched on a gnarled tree stump that’s framed by lovely pastel shades has won our ‘Photo of the Week’ (POTW) prize. 

Captured by audi_db and simply titled ‘Red Squirrel‘, the team love the composition, colours and framing of this nature-themed image. The soft, subtle colours of the background frame the Squirrel beautifully while the sharpness of the Squirrel holds your attention with even the fur of its tail appearing as individual strands. It’s a cute subject where when combined with excellent photography technique has allowed it to stand out in our crowded gallery, grab our attention and be awarded ‘Photo of the Week’. 

All of our POTW winners receive a Samsung EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with an SD Adapter courtesy of Samsung. To be in with a chance of becoming our next POTW winner, simply upload an image to our gallery where you’ll also find all of our past POTW winners.

Plus, going forward, we will also announce a new ‘Photo of the Year’ winner who’ll win a Samsung Portable SSD T7. Each POTW winner, 52 in total, will then have their image shared in a new POTW forum where, in January 2022, we will ask you all to hit the ‘like’ button on your favourite images. Then, the ePHOTOzine team will count up the likes and our first ‘Photo of the Year’ winner will be announced.


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Atmospheric Shipwreck Shot Wins ‘Photo Of The Week’

Atmospheric Shipwreck Shot Wins 'Photo Of The Week'

The wreck of the Yellowfin, a Lowestoft trawler, is the subject of the beautiful seascape that the ePHOTOzine team has chosen to be our ‘Photo of the Week’.

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Competitions

marooned

© cirrusminor

 

A stunning seascape with a trawler wreck standing proud from the still waters has been crowned our ‘Photo of the Week’ (POTW). 

Titled ‘marooned‘ we love the tones, colours and atmosphere in this shot with everything harmonised but still allowing the wreck to take centre-stage. The reflection is superb as is the sharpens of the boat against the mist filling the background of the shot where you see just a glimpse of land adding even more interest to the shot. Composition is spot on, too, as is the overall mood. 

All of our POTW winners receive a Samsung EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with an SD Adapter courtesy of Samsung. To be in with a chance of becoming our next POTW winner, simply upload an image to our gallery where you’ll also find all of our past POTW winners.

Plus, going forward, we will also announce a new ‘Photo of the Year’ winner who’ll win a Samsung Portable SSD T7. Each POTW winner, 52 in total, will then have their image shared in a new POTW forum where, in January 2022, we will ask you all to hit the ‘like’ button on your favourite images. Then, the ePHOTOzine team will count up the likes and our first ‘Photo of the Year’ winner will be announced.

 


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For Seascapes, One Setting Can Make or Break the Shot

For Seascapes, One Setting Can Make or Break the Shot

Seascapes can be beautiful and it’s almost impossible to shoot the same image twice, so the genre can keep pulling you back in. However, one setting almost rules them all when it comes to the final image; get it wrong and you can leave with nothing.

Perhaps it’s because I don’t live near the sea that I gravitate towards seascapes every chance I get. Whatever the case, they are addictive. They can be tricky to get right for a number of reasons before you even get to the settings. The conditions can be many different kinds of weather, but there are some that make your life hard. The position you are relative to the sea is crucial for both the shot and your own safety too. I nearly killed my brand new a7 III after a rogue wave hit the rocks near me and sprayed seawater (which is the devil for electronics) all over me and my equipment, causing it to malfunction.

That said, should you be more sensible than me, there is one setting that dictates how good your seascape is more than others: shutter speed. Whether you want to catch an action shot of a wave mid curl, a dragged shutter of a wave crashing into rocks, or a long exposure of the tide, you need to master what sort of shutter yields which kind of image. This video by Nigel Danson is a great introduction to that. I would also not that timing your shots is crucial too. That is, if you’re dragging your shutter or taking a long exposure, you will want to time the start of the shot with the tide being in the right place. It’s a deceptively nuanced genre.

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SpaceX Astronaut Captures Stellar Photo of Earth, Shot on iPhone

SpaceX Astronaut Captures Stellar Photo of Earth, Shot on iPhone

SpaceX Astronaut Captures Stellar Photo of Earth, Shot on iPhone 8

The first few images released by the SpaceX team were shot with a Nikon DSLR, but the images shared in the most recent drop by mission commander Jared Isaacman were captured using an iPhone 12.

The crew of SpaceX’s Inspiration4 has started sharing some images and videos captured from space during the company’s world’s first civilian orbital mission last month.

As spotted by Digital Trends, the image shared by Isaacman were captured with his smartphone through the all-glass dome that sits underneath the nose cone of the Crew Dragon spacecraft that was the teams home during their three-day journey in orbit or Earth.

SpaceX Astronaut Captures Stellar Photo of Earth, Shot on iPhone 9
Photo by Jared Isaacman

The nose cone, which is seen in the top right corner of the image above that was shared by Isaacman, opens up once the craft is in space to offer the crew on board an incredible panoramic view of planet Earth (and space) through the glass dome. From there, the crew captured over 700 photos and video clips at a distance of 357 miles (575 kilometers) above the planet’s surface, making them images that have been captured from farther away from the planet than even the ones NASA astronauts have shared from the International Space Station.

In addition to the still photo, Isaccman had also published a short video clip from the journey in late September that was also shot on the iPhone 12 while he and the crew were drifting over Brazil.

“Such a privilege to see our planet from this perspective,” he writes. “We need to take far better care of our home planet and also reaching for the stars.”

There are currently four pages of images on the Inspiration4 Flickr Page with hundreds more planned to be shared there and on the organization’s official Twitter account. It remains to be seen if there will be more images only shot with iPhone and Nikon DSLRs, or if the public will be treated to images captured on a wider range of devices.

For those interested in learning more about what it’s like to shoot photos from space, be sure to read a previous story with Chris Hadfield that features an inside look at the task.


Image credits: Header photo by Inspiration4 mission commander Jared Isaacman via Creative Commons.

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Brighton West Pier Sunset Shot Wins ‘Photo Of The Week’

Brighton West Pier Sunset Shot Wins 'Photo Of The Week'

The pastel tones of sunset take centre-stage in our ‘Photo of the Week’ winning image captured of Brighton West Pier.

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Competitions

Brighton West Pier Sunset

 

A beautiful long exposure seascape with the remains of Brighton West Pier standing proud from the tranquil waters has won our ‘Photo of the Week’ (POTW) accolade. 

The long exposure has turned the sea into a calm pool of light blue liquid that allows the skeletal Brighton Pier to stand tall and strong against a sunset sky filled with pastel shades. The tones are fabulous as is the composition of the shot which, even with the decaying pier, has a calming effect when you view it. 

It’s a lovely seascape capture that we like very much – well done PhilNewberry, your prize is on its way to you. 

All of our POTW winners receive a Samsung EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with an SD Adapter courtesy of Samsung. To be in with a chance of becoming our next POTW winner, simply upload an image to our gallery where you’ll also find all of our past POTW winners.

Plus, going forward, we will also announce a new ‘Photo of the Year’ winner who’ll win a Samsung Portable SSD T7. Each POTW winner, 52 in total, will then have their image shared in a new POTW forum where, in January 2022, we will ask you all to hit the ‘like’ button on your favourite images. Then, the ePHOTOzine team will count up the likes and our first ‘Photo of the Year’ winner will be announced.

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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How it Was Shot: ‘Chair and Shadow’ in San Miguel, Mexico

How it Was Shot: 'Chair and Shadow' in San Miguel, Mexico

How it Was Shot: 'Chair and Shadow' in San Miguel, Mexico 10

I believe it would be fair to say that I am known mostly for my landscape work, from broad “grand landscapes” to abstracts in the slit canyons. But throughout most of my career, I’ve also photographed human-made settings extensively. On a workshop I presented in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico in 1994, I took the group into the Convento San Miguel in the village of Maní.

Maní is so small that it doesn’t even appear on maps of the area. It lies between the famous Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza, in the center of the peninsula, and Tulum, on its east coast. I discovered it by chance on a scouting trip for the workshop in 1993, driving from one major Mayan ruin to the other. But Convento San Miguel, which is bigger than the village, is the real attraction at Maní. Its construction began in 1562, shortly after Cortez’s Spanish conquest of Mexico. Today it is a school, a church, a ruin, and a village meeting center. It is in use daily. Amazingly, the authorities gave us full permission to wander anywhere in the structure and photograph whatever we liked.

In the 1994 workshop, I wandered around working with problems or questions from students but also looking for photographs myself. I incorporate that as a teaching/learning tool during workshops, inviting students to see and discuss what I find is a worthwhile image. Of course, students are scattered around during the field sessions, so only a few can take part in such discussions when I make an image. Consequently, in those days, I also made a 4×5” Polaroid image of each negative I exposed, to show students who had not been there so we could discuss any aspect of the image that interested them. At the end of each field session, as we boarded the chartered bus that took us from place to place, I would pull out the Polaroids I had made that day and passed them around the bus so they could discuss the imagery.

During the field session in Convento San Miguel, I wandered into the room where the image was made. It was a bare, rectangular room with a barrel-vaulted ceiling from end to end, peeling plaster on all walls, one door into the room on the side of the room (the one which I entered), and another door on the shorter wall of the rectangle leading out to a balcony. There were no windows. 

Several students were working on compositions in the room, which contained folding chairs scattered randomly. At one point, after working with one student, I looked up and saw the chair and its shadow exactly where it was in the room. It may have been moved, perhaps several times, by students prior to my entering the room, or even while I was working with a student, but I had not touched it. And yet, the moment I saw it, a whole story unfolded in a flash before my eyes: the great classical cellist, Pablo Casals, had been sitting in that chair practicing the Bach cello suites. He had just finished, gotten up, and walked out of the door leading to the balcony (the one admitting light into the room), and I could still hear the music echoing in the room.

Instantly, I yelled out, “DON’T TOUCH THAT CHAIR!” That chair, together with its shadow, in that bare room, told a full story. But the door was swinging wildly open and closed due to strong winds. So I first set the tripod where I wanted to place my camera, then walked out onto the balcony to find a small piece of plaster (such pieces were everywhere) to shove under the door, as an anchor to prevent it from moving. I found the right-sized piece, and carefully placed it so that the door blocked bare light from streaming toward my lens from the fully opened door. (You can see it under the door.)

Then I made my exposure, knowing I would eventually print it in 11×14” size. I also made a Polaroid of the setting. The Polaroid was usually a rather poor example of what I had pictured in my mind as the final image, but this one was rather good (I used a very low contrast Polaroid film for that exposure). I discussed the image with some students who were still in the room, even encouraging them to make an exposure of it, or any variation of it, if they saw fit.

That was it. That’s the story behind the image. But there are two follow-ups I feel are of such integral importance that they each need further discussion. The first is that upon returning to the bus at the close of our session at the Convento, I pulled out the Polaroids I had made and handed them to the first student in the front seat so they could be passed around the bus for discussion. At the back of the bus was a student who had come with his wife, who was not a student in the workshop (but welcomed, like any non-participating wife, husband, relative or close friend) to join in the fun and discoveries of the workshop. When the Polaroid came to her, she stopped at the one of the chair and shadow, burst into tears, and cried out, “I’ve got to have the photograph.” I was stunned. I pointed out that I hadn’t even developed the negative yet! But she again said, “I have to have the photograph.” 

I said, “How about this: When I return home, I will develop the negative and print it as an 11×14” image. If I like it, I’ll send it to you. If you like it, please pay me. If you don’t like it, please send it back.” She agreed. It took weeks, but I developed and printed the image … and liked it. I mailed it to her and received a check. 

Quite honestly, I don’t know exactly what struck her as so moving that it elicited tears. I never asked. But it was obvious I had made an image that provoked a strong emotional reaction. I think it says something about the emotional power a photograph can have. 

The second follow-up occurred about three years later. During a workshop at my home/studio I was showing prints one evening, discussing questions students had about any aspect of each image. One of the images was this one. I put it up, saying nothing (as I usually do as I show images), waiting for students to make comments or ask questions. One student rose from his chair, walked slowly up to the print, and said, “I can see Pablo Casals sitting in that chair practicing the Bach cello suites” and then he continued to describe what he saw in that image, ending up by saying, “And when he finished, he walked out of that door, and I can still hear the music.” 

I stood there dumbfounded! He had described exactly what I had felt, even using the exact words I had used to describe my feelings. He had never been to a prior workshop, and I had yet to write about this image in any magazine or other venue. He came up with those words solely on his own!

What does this say? To me, it harks back to the opening words of my book, The Art of Photography: “Photography is a form of non-verbal communication.” Apparently, I had communicated something, and apparently, it was communicated so effectively that the receiver (the student) used my exact words to describe what he got out of the image. To this day, I shake my head in disbelief. 


The article courtesy of Medium Format Magazine. The Medium Format Magazine is #1 magazine dedicated to the finest medium and large format photography. Inside you will find an exclusive and in-depth interviews, articles and imagery by the best photographers in the world such as Edward Burtynsky, Christopher Burkett, Nick Brandt, Dan Winters, Cooper & Gorfer, Robert Ascroft, Tim Tadders, to name a few. Use the PETAPIXEL20 code for a 20% discount off the annual subscription.


About the author: Bruce Barnbaum is one of the most prominent photographic thinkers and educators in the world. His iconic book, “The Art of Photography, A Personal Approach to Artistic Expression,” is widely recognized as the bible of photographic thought, insight and instruction. Bruce is also known as one of the finest black and white traditional darkroom printers. His work is represented by galleries in the United States and Europe and is in the collection of museums and private collectors worldwide.

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