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How To Photograph Animals In UK Wildlife Parks

How To Photograph Animals In UK Wildlife Parks

If you want to photograph wildlife that’s not native to the UK without getting on a plane, a safari park is a perfect place to do it.

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Animals / Wildlife

Zebra

 

With half-term coming up in October, you may be looking for something that’ll keep the kids entertained but still give you the opportunity to take a photo or two. One location that’s worth considering is a safari park as there are some excellent ones based in the UK that’ll give you the opportunity to capture frame-filling images of Lions and other animals usually seen on an African plane. 

 

1. Photographing wildlife from your car or a bus 

As you’re going to be stuck in your car, or the safari park’s transport service, a long lens is a must. Something like a 70-300mm telephoto will do nicely but if you have a longer one take that along too as smaller subjects such as birds will look tiny otherwise. The inside of a car isn’t the place for a tripod but having something to support your camera when you’re working with long lenses is a good idea. You can get window-mounted tripods but a beanbag is a cheaper and easier way to go. Simply place it on a surface, rest your camera on it and click away. As you’re shooting through glass pack a lens hood and/or a polarizer filter as they’ll both help minimise reflections. 

 

Wildlife Park

 

2. Use queueing to your advantage

People moan about having to queue but if you’re a photographer at a safari park this could work to your advantage as it means you’ll have time to observe your surroundings. If you can wait in one position for a while to snap interesting behaviour. If you’re visiting the park to see one particular animal make sure you’ve done your research so you know what time of day they’ll be out and most active. Keep an eye on the weather too as this can make some animals retreat to cover and you’ll be left with empty shots of fields. However, if you do get to the park when it’s raining don’t get too down-hearted as some animals don’t mind the rain and raindrops on the fur and the reflection of light on wet surfaces can create very moody photos.

 

Wildlife Park

3. Small changes make a big difference 

As you’re in a small space it can be tricky to move and find different angles to shoot from but there are plenty of other things you can do to improve your shots. Always make sure the eye is in focus and when it is don’t click the shutter straight away – wait for the glint in the eyes that can make both human and animal portraits come to life. Sometimes you’ll have to wait for the animal to move to get this but all you have to do is keep re-adjusting your framing until the moment arrives. If it’s portraits you’re particularly after make sure you zoom in to make them frame-filling and if you have cars or other distracting items in the background wait until you’ve changed position to take the shot or blur it out of sight with a large aperture. If it’s a group of lions or a herd of elephants you’re photographing use a smaller aperture such as f/22 to limit the blur to get the whole group in the shot.

When you’re in a hurry it’s easy to forget about composition so you’ll put your subject slap bang in the centre of the image. For some shots this will create a strong portrait but try to resist doing it every time and really think about the rule of thirds when framing up. You also need space for your animal to walk into and don’t amputate an animals extremities – a lion missing the tip of its tail won’t look right.

As you have to keep your windows up you’ll be shooting through glass so to minimise reflections make sure you have your lens against the window. If you have one, try using a lens hood or you could put your spare hand above or to the side of the lens to help minimise reflection. As the engine will be running you’ll find the glass will be vibrating so speed up the shutter speed to minimise shake. You may also find manual focus handy as glass can sometimes fool a camera.

One more, very important point is to observe the rules. We don’t want to hear any stories of ePz members who were turned into lunch!

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How To Photograph Rocks As Patterns & Textures To Enhance Your Photos

How To Photograph Rocks As Patterns & Textures To Enhance Your Photos

Here’s our guide to shooting our rocky landscape to create abstract patterns and textures to use in other photos.

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Landscape and Travel

Textured Wall

 

Our landscape is abundant with rocky views from the gneiss rocks of Scotland, through the limestone pavements of the Yorkshire Dales, to the rocky Jurassic coastline of Dorset. Move-in closer and their patterns and textures provide fabulous abstract opportunities for photographers.

 

1. Gear Choices 

The beauty of this technique is any camera/lens combination can be used. No special kit is needed – just a good eye for the best viewpoint and artistic flare to determine the best composition. You could use a tripod to be sure of a rock (excuse the pun) solid view, especially when shooting patterns on the ground, as it can be harder to hold the camera rigid when you’re pointing downwards. If you do use a tripod make sure it has an option to splay the legs out wide so you don’t get them in the shot.

A standard lens is ideal, especially for rocks patterns below your feet – either a fixed 50mm or short zoom from around 35-70mm range is fine. Use a longer lens if you can’t get close enough to the rock face. This is ideal for distant coastal cliff faces or mountainsides. A lens with a close focus will be handy when the texture is more important…you can focus in close on the more intricate details of the rock’s composition.

 

2. When To Take Your Photos 

Shoot in overcast light if you want less contrast, but this can reduce the impact of the photo. Sunlight casts shadows making the patterns of rugged rocks become almost 3D. You can use the flash from your camera set to fill to reduce the shadows. If you use a camera that has flash control set the flash compensation to -1 in sun-behind-clouds situations and -2 in bright sunlight. The result will be a reduction in the density of shadow areas, but still enough to give the necessary 3D effect.

 

3. Where To Look

Some of the best patterns can be seen in strata, layers of rock that have been formed by layer upon layer of rock or soil millions of years ago. These layers have become exposed by erosion from the sea or natural earth movement or from being cut away to make roads.

Some of the best viewpoints for photography can be found on the coastline. Go to any rocky coastline and you’re likely to find interesting rock patterns and textures, whether on the cliff faces or the natural pavement you walk on. Cliff faces provide head-on views and show the strata with the most dramatic lines while the ocean bed, exposed at low tide, can provide smoother more interesting shapes.

Look for rocks covered on lichen – coastal and exposed mountain moorland areas or dense woodland where it’s likely to be regularly damp are ideal for this sort of texture. Use the lens on close focus to crop in on the minute detailed textures and patterns.

 

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Get Up To 30% Off Regatta Waterproof Jackets

Get Up To 30% Off Regatta Waterproof Jackets

Regatta has taken up to 30% off the price of waterproof jackets so you can save money while getting ready for your Autumn walks.

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Offers

Men's Britedale Waterproof Jacket Black

 

Outdoor clothing specialist Regatta is giving you the chance to save up to 30% when purchasing a waterproof jacket. 

This offer applies to select jackets/coats and a wide variety of items are available for Men, Women and Children with some £100 coats now priced at £69.95. 

A wide range of sizes, styles and colours are available so no matter if you’re planning a long Autumn hike or a quick stroll around your local park, you’ll find a discounted waterproof jacket for you. 

These discounts are currently available until 21/09/21. 

Save Up To 30% With Regatta*

 

*It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these affiliate links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You

A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You

– Partner Content – 

Wedding Photography Editing With Affinity

 

There are few more important times to impress your photography clients than when you’re shooting their wedding. Extraordinary, Instagrammable images are now the expectation rather than the exception, but given the unpredictable nature of a wedding day, sometimes a little help is needed to elevate a shot, turning it from good to great. This is where Affinity Photo comes into its own. With a full range of tools powerful enough for professionals, but easy enough for newcomers to pick up quickly, the subscription-free Affinity Photo has to be a serious consideration for any wedding photographer’s suite of tools, even if you’re working on an iPad. 

 

Create With Confidence

A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You 1

 

Thanks to its non-destructive editing process, Affinity Photo rewards experimentation without the danger of permanently ruining an image. You can play with the sliders, adjust your crop, exposure or contrast, and take a few risks, knowing that the original image is always there to roll back to if and when you need to. This freedom gives photographers the confidence to be creative, and step outside their comfort zone. The layers system, which will be familiar to anyone who has digitally edited images in the past, offers the creative freedom photographers are used to, along with a fully featured toolset to make the most of your clients’ precious images. 

 

Brighten Dull Days

A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You 2

 

A clear, sunny wedding day is at the top of most brides’ (and their photographers’) wish lists, but as the old football adage goes “can they do it on a wet Tuesday in Stoke?” Affinity Photo makes adding a little sunshine to a dull day simple. Whether you need add a little golden hour glow, a spectacular lens flare, or replace the entire sky, the tools are at your fingertips. Using a combination of the layers and live filters gives you the power to ramp up the impact of your images, and give your brides the wedding album they dreamed of, even if the weather on the day didn’t behave as everyone hoped. 

 

Retouch Like A Pro

A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You 3

 

When it comes to wedding portraits, soft and dreamy light is the order of the day, and Affinity Photo has you covered. Within the Live Filters menu, you will find a fantastically versatile Gaussian blur filter to enhance your brides’ natural beauty. By adding a soft glow, and a little warm light, you can elevate your images and blow your clients away. Use this in conjunction with the integrated Frequency Separation filter to further enhance skin and remove any blemishes, and you have a formidable set of retouching tools at your disposal to bring your creative vision to life. 

 

Love Your Luts

A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You 4

 

With a fully-featured luts (presets) system (and a vibrant community of creators) Affinity Photo really becomes a sandbox for wedding photographers to try new looks. The software comes bundled with a range of luts ready to use out of the box, with thousands more available across the internet. Whether you’re looking for old-school film looks, cinematic edits, or something a little more off-kilter, you’ll find a wealth of new styles to really make your next wedding stand out. With all luts compatible with Affinity Photo on all platforms, it’s never been easier to get a consistent look across an entire shoot, whether you are editing in the studio or on the move. 

 

Bring Back Bokeh

A Relationship Built To Last: Affinity Photo And You 5

 

If you’re blessed with a bright, sunny day, and you’re forced to shoot with a slower aperture, you can easily lose out on all that dreamy bokeh that wedding clients love so much. With a little Affinity Photo trickery, you can easily bring back that gorgeous background blue, and really make your bridal portraits pop. By simply using the Depth Of Field live filter, you can draw attention to the area of the image you want, or hide distractions in plain sight, with natural looking, aesthetically pleasing bokeh.

With all of the above, and so many more features which wedding photographers of all persuasions will appreciate, it’s no surprise that Affinity Photo is rapidly gaining popularity with professionals who need a fully-featured, reliable suite of professional-grade tools, without committing to a subscription-based package. 

Affinity Photo v1.10 is out now, with no subscription. It’s received extensive performance tweaks, most importantly in adding greater efficiency when blending layers together, while retaining a non-destructive workflow – a key attribute that sets Affinity Photo apart from the competition.

The new approach also introduces some options to ensure editing speed remains slick even after building up a complex stack of hundreds of pixel and vector layers, and filter effects, while still maintaining the full layer stack.

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6 Top Tips On How To Photograph Stairs & Steps Creatively

6 Top Tips On How To Photograph Stairs & Steps Creatively

Stairs and steps can make really interesting, often graphical, photos so next time you’re waiting to climb a staircase, why not have a think about how you could photograph it?

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Architecture

Stairs

 

Stairs and steps may sound boring, however, when you start thinking about the materials they’re made from and the shapes and styles that exist, you’ll soon realise there’s plenty of steps to keep you and your camera occupied. Be it a graphical shot of an industrial set of steps leading up the side of a metal structure or a spiral staircase in a grand house, if you keep your eyes open, you’ll soon realise there are many interesting sets of steps and stairs around you that will make an interesting image. Here are a few tips to get you thinking about how you can capture shots of these subjects next time you’re out exploring with your camera. 

 

1. Gear Suggestions

A wide-angle lens will exaggerate the twists and turns of a spiral staircase while a telephoto lens is good for bringing staircases on the outside of buildings to you. Pack a polariser for stairs against glass or reflective surfaces and a tripod would be handy to help you make sure that the stairs are perfectly straight.

 

2. Guide The Eye

As stairs take you somewhere they’re naturally a great way to lead you into and through an image. They can be used to guide the eye to a particular feature or you could hide the last part of the staircase to leave the viewer wondering where the stairs may go to. Lines are a great way to lead the eye into the image and you don’t get a better line than a long bannister so use them to your advantage.

 

3. Spirals

Stand at the top or bottom of a spiral staircase with your wide-angle lens and you can get a great but rather overdone shot of the spiral shape twisting up. Try getting someone to stand or lay at the bottom or carefully peek over the bannister at the top and use the spiralling stairs as a frame.

 

Double staircase

 

 

4. Movement And Size

For your more normal staircases use your wide-angle lens to exaggerate the grandeur of a particularly wide, long set of stairs or use a slow shutter speed if you’re in a city and blur the movement of city-goers as they pass through your shot. Zoom in and fill the frame with repeating patterns of stairs to exaggerate their size which will also give your image a more graphical feel. 

 

5. Reflections

Some staircases go up the outside of buildings so use your telephoto lens to bring them to you. This lens is also great if your stairs are reflected to give you symmetry in your shot. Try to stand so you’re in the centre of the stairs and reflection to enhance the pattern.

 

6. Be Different

For something different try to shoot through the spindles to the other side of the staircase or if you’re outdoors, use them to frame a single building or a shot of showing part of the city. Try altering your angle, shooting lower down to emphasise the height and/or the number of steps in front of you. Many cameras now have vari-angle LCD screens which allow you to frame your subjects from multiple angles with ease. Which means you won’t have to get down on your knees or crouch when capturing low-angled shots. Use light and shadows to add depth, shapes and another level of interest to your shots and experiment with colour, too as turning an image black & white can really make the viewer focus on the shapes and textures of an image when the colour’s stripped away. 

 

Stairs

   

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8 Top Photography Tutorials To Help Improve Composition

8 Top Photography Tutorials To Help Improve Composition

Learn how to use lines, patterns and symmetry to improve the composition of your shots so they’re more eye-catching.

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General Photography

Lighthouse

 

As patterns, lines and symmetry surround us, it makes sense to use these features to help us create interesting compositions which in turn, produce a great photograph. So, to help you on your journey to creating better compositions here are 11 tutorials that use lines, symmetry and patterns as ways to enhance images. 

 

1. How To Capture Patterns On Your Travels

Patterns may not be the first thing that spring to mind when you’re on holiday and capturing images of your trip but they can be an interesting subject to focus on.

Learn More

 

2. How To Use Patterns & Repetition In Your Photography

When you’re out on a day trip or on your two-week annual holiday and are looking for some photographic inspiration, have a walk around and start shooting patterns, we’ll guarantee you’ll soon become addicted.

Learn More

 

3. Shooting Rocks As Patterns & Textures To Enhance Your Photos

Our landscape is abundant with rocky views from the gneiss rocks of Scotland, through the limestone pavements of the Yorkshire Dales, to the rocky Jurassic coastline of Dorset. Move-in closer and their patterns and textures provide fabulous abstract opportunities for photographers.

Learn More

 

4. How To Shoot Patterns In Architecture: 4 Quick Tips To Get You Started

Here are a few quick tips on looking for, and photographing, patterns in architecture found in towns and cities.

Learn More

 

 

Landscape

 

5. How To Use The Power Of Lines To Improve Your Landscape Photography

Did you know that you can use diagonal lines to guide the eye, add interest and more to your landscape shots? If you didn’t, here are 4 top tips on the subject for you to peruse.

Learn More

 

6. Why & How To Use Vertical Lines In Your Photos

Here are 6 reasons why you should try to use vertical lines in your images as well as a few tips on how to use them to make the most impact in your shots.

Learn More

 

7. How To Use Horizontal Lines Successfully In Your Images

Enhance patterns and add interest to your photos with horizontal lines which you can find almost anywhere when you really look.

Learn More

 

8. Three Reasons Why Converging Verticals In Photos Can Be A Good Thing

Converging lines and verticals don’t always have to be avoided. In fact, they can be a clever tool for guiding the eye when used right.

Learn More

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition  

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : up to some monkey business

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Up To Some Monkey Business

26 Aug 2021 3:35PM  
Views : 99
Unique : 80

An invitation came through to visit and photograph Trentham Monkey Forest, so Sue and I packed some light camera kit and off we went down the M6. Sue was using the Pentax K-3 with 18-270mm lens and I had the Canon R5 with the new 70-200mm f/4. The review of the Canon lens is now live on ePHOTOzine.
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It was a great day for the purpose, not too sunny so no horrible shadows to deal with. We were greeted by Matt:
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and then let loose into the forest, where the monkeys were critically observing the humans that passed by. Actually, they just might have been more interested in finding scraps of food, tumbling out of trees and picking fleas off each other.
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Photographically, it’s good fun and definitely worth a visit, otherwise probably a great place to take the kids. Just at the moment there are nine baby monkeys, so plenty of “aah” factor!

Many thanks to Monkey Forest for the opportunity.

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jackalltog’s latest blog : first visit to london in about 18 months

jackalltog's latest blog : fist visit to london in about 18 months


jackalltog's latest blog : first visit to london in about 18 months 7

JackAllTog


Hi there, Hope you’re having a good day and enjoy sharing and discussing photos.
I’m more than happy for all feedback – good or bad – i’ll learn more from critique.
I live in Woking, I work in IT in London just like millions of others.

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jackalltog’s latest blog : fist visit to london in about 18 months

jackalltog's latest blog : fist visit to london in about 18 months


jackalltog's latest blog : fist visit to london in about 18 months 9

JackAllTog


Hi there, Hope you’re having a good day and enjoy sharing and discussing photos.
I’m more than happy for all feedback – good or bad – i’ll learn more from critique.
I live in Woking, I work in IT in London just like millions of others.

…Read More

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johnriley1uk’s latest blog : noirmoutier to honfleur

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Save 69% on inPixio Photo Studio 11 Ultimate (discount applied at checkout)

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Noirmoutier to Honfleur

13 Aug 2021 3:45PM  
Views : 67
Unique : 60

France has plenty to offer the photographer, and I was sorting a few images and came across a selection from Noirmoutier and Honfleur. So I thought I would share them with you.

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These were shot a few years ago on the Pentax *istDS with the SMC Pentax-DA 16-45mm f/4 lens. It may have only been a 6MP CCD, but I think it had a certain attractive quality that comes across well on a monitor screen. If we all never make a print again and spend our lives in isolation on the web, then maybe 6MP will be enough! However, I am hoping for rather better than that….

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