Posted on Leave a comment

Black Friday 2021: When Is Black Friday? What Is Black Friday? And Why Should I Be Excited About It?

Black Friday 2021: When Is Black Friday? What Is Black Friday? And Why Should I Be Excited About It?

-Advertorial Promotion-

 

Black Friday

 

What Is Black Friday?

Black Friday is now a day that most consumers have written in their diaries as it’s a time when stores of all shapes, sizes and varieties offer discounts on a huge range of goods. 

Originally, it was an American event that took place the day after Thanksgiving but now, it’s definitely a day the UK embrace. In fact, it’s now not even a day with many retailers running week-long discounts that take consumers right through the sale weekend into what’s known as Cyber Monday. 

 

When Is Black Friday?

Black Friday 2021 takes place in November and this year, it falls on Friday 26 November 2021. However, some retailers, both online and on the high street, do start sales earlier so do keep an eye out for posters, emails and online ads which have Black Friday Deal details on them. 

 

What Time Does Black Friday Start?

The time offers become available will change from store-to-store but generally, it’s midnight online and high street retailers often open earlier (around 6 am). Different deals may also go live at different times. For example, as well as ‘deals of the day’, Amazon offers ‘Lightning deals’ which are discounted products available in limited quantities, for a short period of time. ‘Lightning deals’ are introduced throughout the sale, with new deals becoming available as often as every five minutes.

 

Online Shopping

 

Where Can I Get The Best Black Friday Deals?

All major stores and even some independent retailers offer Black Friday deals so it’s more of a case of knowing what you’re looking for and shopping in the right place. 

For ease, most people actually do their Black Friday shopping online and if you’re going to be one of the millions of customers who do this, don’t forget most stores also have apps you can use that make it easier and quicker to shop. 

 

How Can I Ensure I Get The Best Black Friday Discounts?

To get the best Black Friday 2021 discounts, you often need to shop early as stock flies off shelves quickly and do your research beforehand so you know if you are really getting a bargain or not. This could mean checking the average price of things that you want before the discounts are applied as well as comparing discounts from store-to-store. You also need to factor in P&P when shopping online as this will add more money to your total. 

If you don’t already have accounts with stores online, create them before Black Friday arrives so the order process is quicker and if you have voucher codes, put them all in one place so you can quickly refer to them (if applicable). You can also sign up for email alerts so you don’t miss any deal announcements. 

 

Shops

 

What Is Cyber Monday? 

Once the dust has settled on Black Friday, Cyber Monday 2021 arrives for tech fans and this year, it’s Monday 29 November 2021 – just after payday for many. Basically, it’s another day you can take advantage of big discounts before Christmas arrives. 

 

When Will My Black Friday Goods Arrive?

Due to the volume of orders stores receive, they may be a slight delay on when your new purchases will arrive but a lot of stores do work hard to ensure delivery deadlines are met. 

 

Amazon Prime And Black Friday Deals

PrimeIf you’re an Amazon Prime member, even one who’s enjoying a free Amazon Prime 30-day trial, you are usually given a 30-minute early access period to all Lightning Deals on Black Friday.  

Start An Amazon Prime 30-Day Free Trial 

 

Find The Best Deals With ePHOTOzine 

ePHOTOzine wants to help you find the best deals on cameras, photography accessories and more so like last year, we’ll be updating the website with posts on the very best photography related deals. The deals will be posted in one feature so they’re easy to find and you can even bookmark the page once it’s live on site.  

We have some very exciting offers from a wide range of photographic brands waiting to reveal their Black Friday Deals so do make sure you’re signed up to receive our newsletter so you’ll be one of the first to see what fantastic offers are available. 

 

By using our Amazon Affiliate links when ordering anything online, you are supporting the site – thank you.

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

rlf’s latest blog : when your time is up

Sad

When your time is up

11 Nov 2021 3:41PM  
Views : 32
Unique : 27

I was walking my daughter’s dog this morning and saw across the river an old man I know walking his pup. I waved and shouted we’d see him at the bridge. 15 minutes later I crossed the bridge to see his dog sitting next to his master who was stone cold dead.Sad
The air ambulance arrived within10 minutes but it was to no avail. He was in his 80’s and of all the people to find him I’m sure he’d be happy it was me. I told the police I’d take her home with me as she knew me well and loved playing with my daughters dog (Nala) and then I’d go to the vets to get her chip read.
The vet informed me they’d have to keep the dog and pass it onto the dog warden! I told them in no uncertain terms that leaving her in a kennel by herself after she’s just lost her master was out of the question
She is now sitting in Nala’s basket chewing a tennis ball at the moment. If the man’s relatives want to take her in that will be great otherwise I believe it was meant to be and she’ll be looked after by me
As I arrived at the vets two young women were leaving in floods of tears as their 15 year old Husky had just been euthanised … 3 years ago the same vets put Big TED out of his miserySad
A strange sad day for Skeet
I’ll be laying flowers where he died tomorrow
RIP

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : when is an abbey not an abbey?

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

Profile

When is an Abbey not an Abbey?

18 Sep 2021 12:12AM  
Views : 183
Unique : 170

When it’s a priory. Such is the status of Anglesey Abbey near Cambridge. It was originally Anglesey Priory, but the owner thought that wasn’t grand enough, so he renamed it Anglesey Abbey. As houses of this nature go, this one is positively cosy, and it’s the sort of place I could imagine living quite happily. For the visitor the grounds offer a lot of interest and I understand this is a favourite haunt of many local people. Here’s some pictures of the Abbey and of some of the Dahlias from the Dahlia Garden, which was in full bloom and looked absolutely fantastic.

22471_1631920168.jpg

22471_1631920180.jpg

22471_1631920193.jpg

22471_1631920202.jpg

22471_1631920217.jpg

22471_1631920225.jpg

22471_1631920233.jpg

22471_1631920242.jpg

22471_1631920251.jpg

22471_1631920260.jpg

22471_1631920270.jpg

There are no comments here! Be the first!

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

Save £40 When Purchasing A Vanguard VEO Range T37M Backpack

Save £40 When Purchasing A Vanguard VEO Range T37M Backpack

You can currently save £40 when purchasing the VEO Range T37M Backpack and ePHOTOzine members can also receive a bonus ‘10% off’ with our exclusive code.

| 
Vanguard VEO T 45M in Offers

VEO RANGE T 37M BK

 

If you buy a Vanguard VEO Range T37M backpack from any authorised UK dealer, before the end of 30 September 2021, you can save £40!

The Vanguard VEO Range T37M has space for a mirrorless camera, 4-5 lenses, a 9.7” tablet and a travel tripod. It’s available in blue, black and stone priced at £59.99 (after the discount is applied).

As well as saving £40, ePHOTOzine members can take an extra 10% off with our exclusive code: EPZ10 when used on the Vanguard website before the end of 31 August 2021. The 10% discount is also valid on any VEO Range T backpack including the Vanguard VEO T 45M which received a ‘Highly Recommended award from ePHOTOzine in our review. 

For more information, visit the Vanguard website

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

robert51’s latest blog : when is our images over saturated ?

robert51's latest blog : is it time to start shooting in the raw...

Save 69% on inPixio Photo Studio 11 Ultimate (discount applied at checkout)

Profile

When is our images over saturated ?

13 Aug 2021 8:35AM  
Views : 77
Unique : 63

Ever wondered if the colours are a little to strong or one colour is ?
How can we check this and even fix it.

90116_1628839121.jpg

Here is a classic pin up which by there very nature were always over saturated but will demo what we can do.
1. Open image.
2. Open an “Invert” adjustment layer. Change the blend to “Color” and the opacity to “50%”.
3. This should now be black and white. If you see any colours they are over saturated.

The Fix…
4. Go below the “Invert” layer and open a “Hue/Saturation” adjustment layer.
5. In the panel click (or double click) on the finger with arrows on either side.
This will change the cursor to an eye dropper.
6. Move ove the image and click on any colour you see.
7. Now move the saturtion slider down until it just takes away the colour.
Repeat for any other colours.
8 Turn off the “Invert” layer to see results.

90116_1628839809.jpg

This is very quick and will help you to control those colours.
The opacity slider on the Hue/Saturation layer can always be decreased if you want to push that saturation.

These are quick tips to try help people understand PS as it can be a bit overpowering at times…

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

How To Avoid Those Postcard-Style Shots When On Your Travels

How To Avoid Those Postcard-Style Shots When On Your Travels

If you want to capture holiday photos that are a bit different to everyone else’s vacation snaps, have a read of our 5 top travel photography tips.

| 
Landscape and Travel

eiffel tower

 

Once you have your tourist, postcard style shots, spend a few hours of your vacation time thinking about how you can do things a little bit differently. (Yes, we know we are talking about not doing this but the reason everyone takes these shots is that they do actually look good, most of the time. Just remember to get up early or stay out late to miss the rush of tourists so you stand a better chance of capturing people-free shots.)
 

1. Use It As A Secondary Point Of Interest

Instead of making the landmark your main point of focus, place another object in the foreground and use the landmark as background detail for your shot. You could use a larger aperture to throw it slightly out of focus but don’t go too wide as you still want the landmark to be recognisable. For shots with plenty of depth of field, think like a landscape photographer, standing further back from your landmark so you can add interest in the foreground as well as the middle and background of the shot.

 

2. Find A New Angle

This is an obvious point that’s also easier said than done sometimes but even the smallest change in composition can make a big difference to the shot. Try blurring foliage into an out of focus frame, shoot through a window or arch or look for objects your landmark can be reflected in. Shooting down into a puddle of water, particularly on a moody, wet day will give any landmark photo an interesting twist while switching from a wide lens to telephoto so you can crop in will give you a shot that’s ever so subtly different but yet, still recognisable to those back home.

Watch for where the crowds go and head off in a different direction, looking for new vantage points to shoot from. This could mean climbing to get above it or trying to get lower to shoot from nearer the ground. We can’t guarantee you won’t get any funny looks but you should walk away with a set of unique shots. 

 

eiffel tower

 

3. Get In Close

As landmarks are well known you don’t have to get the whole structure in the frame for people to know what it is. The blue/green shade of the Statue of Liberty will be recognisable no matter how close you zoom in. In fact, the shapes created to form drapes in the statue’s clothing could create an interesting abstract shot if you have a lens that can get you close enough.

 

4. Head Out When Other’s Don’t

A cloudy, rainy day will put most sight-seers off and you should take advantage of this. They’ll be less bad weather shots than there are scenes with blue sky and sun. Rainy days also mean you can shoot reflections (as mentioned above). Just remember to protect your equipment as unless it’s waterproof, it won’t like the rain.

 

Whitby

 

5. Human Interest

We said above to head out early/late to avoid crowds but including one or two people can give your landmark shot a new angle. By adding people, street vendors setting up near the landmark or people sweeping away rubbish, you add a new level of interest to what would be ‘just another tourist shot’. As people have a habit of stopping what they’re doing and either grinning or frowning when they see a camera pointed at them you may need to work more like a street photographer to get shots where your subject isn’t posed. 

 

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

10 Safety Tips For Photographers When Traveling

10 Safety Tips For Photographers When Traveling

Here’s a quick list of 10 tips to help you keep your camera safe while on holiday so you can enjoy yourself and not worry about your photography kit.

| 
Landscape and Travel

 

Mexico

 

 

1. Make A Checklist

Before you leave for the airport make a list of all the equipment you’re taking with you, writing down the serial and model numbers, too. It’ll also help if you take photos of your equipment for your records.

 

2. Check Your Insurance

Make sure you have the right insurance just in case your equipment’s stolen or damaged. If you’re unsure if your equipment’s covered, read your policy or ring your insurer. 
 

3. Put Your Equipment In Your Hand-Luggage 

Camera gear is fragile so don’t pack it in the case you plan on checking in at the airport. If you do, you run the risk of equipment getting damaged. Do remember to check the size and weight restrictions on luggage with the company you’re travelling with as airlines tend to have different rules/restrictions when it comes to luggage you can carry-on. 
 

4. Don’t Take Trips On Your Own

If you’re planning a few day trips don’t go alone. That way, when you’re framing up your shot, your ‘buddy’ can watch your camera bag and any other equipment you have.

 

5. What’s Your Bag Look Like?

Don’t use a bag that screams: “Look! I have a very expensive camera in here.”

 

Rome

 

6. Don’t Put Your Bag Down

Even when you’re taking a photo don’t leave your bag on the floor and never leave it unattended. When you’re in busy locations such as markets, carry the bag on your front as if it’s on your back, there is the chance that someone could access it without you knowing. You may think you look a little silly but that’s better than finding all of your gear’s gone.

 

7. Carry Spare Memory Cards

Don’t just take one memory card with you as if it’s stolen or lost that’s it. Always carry a spare in your bag and keep one locked away in your hotel room too, just in case.

 

8. Try To Fit In

Having confidence and looking like you know where you’re going (even if you don’t) will mean you’re less likely to be bothered. Try to blend in rather than stand out as a tourist. 

 

9. Put Your Equipment In A Net

You can buy safety nets which you place your equipment in and then you fasten the net to a solid object that’s fastened down.

 

10. Use A Safe

Most rooms have safes that will fit memory cards, chargers, a smartphone or a small DSLR body in. If you have lots of kit or there’s no safe in your room, ask at reception to see if they have them available at the desk. Just make sure you make a note of everything you hand over and take images so you have proof if anything goes missing. 

If you have any tips for photographers heading off on holiday, add them to the comments. 

 

Mexico

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

johnriley1uk’s latest blog : when is a landscape not a landscape?

johnriley1uk's latest blog : the cameras with the wonderful lenses

When is a landscape not a landscape?

14 Jun 2021 5:22PM  
Views : 135
Unique : 109

Categories. Labels. Generally, this is the stuff that we can debate for ever but is at the very core of most competitions. Of course, there is always the designation Open, which indicates anything goes, but when we start to apply labels then the difficulty of definition is there from the start. The usual descriptions are Landscape, Portrait, Record, Still Life, Wildlife, and so on, each one fraught with difficulties. Record is one that bamboozles many a club photographer, arguments that run from every image being a record of what was in front of the camera to the strict definition of a reproduction of an object showing its form so that it could be rebuilt from the image, that is, a realistic record. Then we ask does a landscape include seascapes, cityscapes……..Or does portrait include groups of people, if so how many, or does it include portraits of pets and animals in general……

It all goes to show how we love to apply labels to things, to define them. I’m going to look for some images now to label and if we’re lucky I might find some that challenge the perception of the groups and widen our thoughts about these narrow categories.

Candlelit Glamour, portrait or low light?
22471_1623687041.jpg

No Escape, what category? Creative?
22471_1623687082.jpg

Cyber Blues. Record?
22471_1623687125.jpg

Alice In Wonderland. Portrait? Reportage?
22471_1623687159.jpg

Cassie with Red Gels. Portrait? Creative?
22471_1623687214.jpg

Urban Exploration. Record? Creative? Reportage?
22471_1623687285.jpg

Most Haunted. Reportage? Portrait? Creative?
22471_1623687364.jpg

Best Men. Portrait? Creative? Social? reportage?
22471_1623687478.jpg

22471_1623687530.jpg

I’m trying to move away from labels and categories, as much as possible anyway. What they all are could be described as images.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

7 Top Reasons Why You Should Use Longer Lenses When Taking Photos

7 Top Reasons Why You Should Use Longer Lenses When Taking Photos

Pentax SMC DA* 200mm f/2.8 ED(IF) SDM

 

If you’ve been wondering if you should purchase a telephoto lens, here are 7 reasons why, we think, they’re a worthwhile investment. Still not sure? Have a read of our lens buying guide and we also have a top list of telephoto lenses that’s well worth a peruse. 

 

1. Out Of Focus Background

Fountain

 

Telephoto lenses are useful for producing shots that have a shallow depth of field which means your backgrounds will be nicely out of focus allowing all attention to fall on your subject.

2. Capturing Portraits

Portrait

 

Shooting portraits with longer lenses means you still fill the frame with your subject’s face without making them feel uncomfortable by invading their personal space. Longer focal lengths also give a more pleasing perspective and the good bokeh they create, as mentioned previously, helps isolate your subject so they ‘pop’ from the frame. Finally, the compression longer lenses offer, especially when you’re using a wide-ish aperture, helps flatter their features – something all subjects want.

3. Shoot Landscapes

If you have distant and foreground interest you should pull out your longer lens from your bag. Just make sure you’re using a small aperture as you’ll need front to back sharpness in your shot. This works well with interesting rock formations, trees etc. but also consider using an object such as a fence or path that can lead the eye from the front of the image to a point of interest in the distance. The perspective longer lenses create also mean you can almost stack distant and objects closer to your lens so they appear to be much closer to each other than they are, adding impact and extra interest as you do. This can work particularly well on misty mornings when distant hills can be turned into lines of stacked shapes.

If you have a lot of open, boring space between you and the mountains you want to photograph use the longer focal length to pull the mountains to you, removing the empty foreground as you do. You can also pick out detail such as a waterfall, tree or distant structure that a wide-angle lens wouldn’t be able to capture in the same way.

 

4. Photograph Buildings

Car Park

 

Longer lenses will help you highlight patterns and shoot interesting detail you’d miss with a wide-angle lens. It also means that if you can’t access the roof to get close to the statues/carvings that sit around the building you’re photographing, you can use the longer lens from the ground to bring the detail to you. Do remember though that when longer lenses magnify distant objects the tiniest of movements can create a large amount of blur in your photograph so make sure you stick to quicker shutter speeds when possible and carry a lens that features vibration reduction. For more stability work with a tripod.

 

5. Capture Shots Of Wildlife

Swan

 

Try and get close to a lot of wildlife and they’ll have ran or flown off before you’ve got your camera out of its bag. Instead of playing a game of cat and mouse all day, find a spot that you won’t scare the wildlife off from and use the pull of a telephoto lens to bring the animal/bird to you. Using a longer lens will also mean you’re not putting yourself in danger if you’re trying to capture shots of something known to bite!

6. Photograph Action / Sporting Events 

Unless you have a press pass, getting close to the action at many sporting events isn’t possible so you’ll need your long lens. For tips on shooting action take a look at ePHOTOzine’s technique section.

 

7. Shoot For The Moon

Moon

 

If you try and photograph the moon without a telephoto lens (you may also need a teleconverter too) it will just like a small bright circle sat against a blanket of black sky. For tips on shooting the moon take a look at our previous articles in the technique section.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link

Posted on Leave a comment

5 Questions To Ask When Photographing Landmarks

5 Questions To Ask When Photographing Landmarks

When photographing landmarks and other well-known places, it can be tricky to try and capture a shot that a million other people haven’t got so we’ve got a few travel photography tips and tricks to help you out.

| 
Landscape and Travel

Mexico ruin

 

 

It’s well-known in the photography community that you can go to certain locations and expect to see tripod holes in the floor where photographer after photographer has set-up to capture a popular shot so how can we, as photographers, do something a little bit different? We answer this question, and more, below. 

 

1. What Gear Do I Need? 

  1. Zoom lens – it’s easier to carry just one lens
  2. Support – A support that’s lightweight and compact is easier to carry and this could be a tripod or monopod, depending on your preference. 
  3. Camera bag – An everyday backpack which is strong, can carry various pieces of kit and is easy to access is perfect for this type of photography. A rucksack style distributes the weight of kit more evenly, which means you’ll be more comfortable when walking for long periods of time. 

 

2. What Research Should I Do? 

Having a look through online photo galleries and in travel guides will give you an overall picture of how the landmark(s) you’re planning on visiting have been captured before. You’ll also be able to find out if there are any costs and the opening/closing times so you can plan your trip around the crowds of tourists that will no doubt flock to your photographic subject. When you arrive at your destination have a look around the tourist information office as you’ll find plenty of postcards that feature photos of landmarks and other important buildings which can be a great source for shooting ideas.

 

Mexico

 

3. Is Clichéd OK?

There are shots that every photographer and his dog have taken of well-known landmarks, but this doesn’t mean you should avoid them. A good, postcard style shot of a landmark is something you should try and get early on in your trip then spend the rest of the hour, day or week looking for angles that mean the landmark is still recognisable but the shot you produce is slightly different to what someone would usually expect to see.

 

4. When Should I Plan My Visit For? 

The problem with landmarks is they’re popular with tourists so unless you want them in the shot, you’ll have to arrive early or stay late to avoid them. Of course, changing your angle or working a little closer to the structure will mean tourists become less of a problem. If it’s a really busy day, including them in the shot can add an extra element of interest. Particularly if you use a slightly slower shutter speed to blur their movement around the bottom of the structure you’re photographing. Just remember to carry your tripod as you will need it if you plan on playing with slower shutter speeds. Panoramas can work particularly well in busy places too. 

There’s probably a couple of local landmarks that may not be as popular with the tourists but are important to the people who live there so consider capturing them too if you want to work somewhere that’s slightly less busy.

 

Durham

 

5. How Can I Be Different? 

Use your feet and take a walk around to find a unique take on the landmark you’re photographing. How does it look from underneath? Can you crouch down and shoot up? Or climb some steps or a hill that’s close by to give you a little more elevation. Working from a slightly higher angle can help reduce the convergence you get when shooting tall structures too. When you’ve finished with the front of the structure have you ever considered photographing it from the back? No? Well, not many tourists do either so you’ll be able to capture a unique photo.

 

You’ve read the technique now share your related photos for the chance to win prizes: Daily Forum Competition

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

Source link