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These are the funniest wildlife photos of 2021

Highly commended winner: Chu Han Lin with their picture "See who jumps high."

There are plenty of photo contests out there, but few as fun and light-hearted as theComedy Wildlife Photography Awards (the Comedy Pet Photo Awards are also good for a laugh). You can check out the full list of winners and highly commended photos online right now. But these are the ones that had us laughing hardest: 

About the competition

Highly commended winner: David Eppley with their picture "Majestic and Graceful Bald Eagle."
Highly commended winner: David Eppley with their picture “Majestic and Graceful Bald Eagle.”
“Bald Eagles will use the same nest for years, even decades, adding new material to it at the beginning and throughout the nesting season. Normally, they are highly skilled at snapping branches off of trees while in flight. Possibly tired from working nonstop all morning on a new nest, this particular Bald Eagle wasn’t showing its best form. Yes, sometimes they miss. Although this looks painful, and it might very well be, the eagle recovers with just a few sweeping wing strokes, and choses to rest a bit before making another lumber run.” David Eppley/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards “aim to widen understanding and engagement with global conservation—for the preservation of biodiversity and the health and enrichment of everyone on Earth.” 

How? By getting funny photos of wild animals in front of as many people as possible and donating 10% of the revenue from the competition to conservation projects around the world. This year, it’s the Gunung Palung Orang-utan Conservation Program in Borneo. You can read the full conservation statement on their Website for more information.

The wonderful winner

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards overall winner
Overall winner: Ken Jensen with their picture titled “Ouch!”
“A golden silk monkey in Yunnan China – this is actually a show of aggression however in the position that the monkey is in it looks quite painful!” Ken Jensen/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Ken Jensen took home the top prize of a safari for two with Alex Walker’s Serian for this shot titled, “Ouch!”, of a golden silk monkey in China, who seems to be having quite a bad day. 

According to Jensen, it’s actually a show of aggression. But the shot very much looks like a still frame from the TV show, Jackass.

Alex Walker’s Serian Creatures on the Land Award

Creatures on Land Award winner: Arthur Trevino with their picture "Ninja Prairie Dog!"
Creatures on Land Award winner: Arthur Trevino with their picture “Ninja Prairie Dog!”
“When this Bald Eagle missed on its attempt to grab this prairie dog, the prairie dog jumped towards the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow. A real David vs Goliath story!” Arthur Trevino/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Arthur Trevino won the “Creatures of the Land” category for the photo, “Ninja Prairie Dog!” I think it’s my favorite of all the shots in this article because it’s just so ridiculous. 

Trevino explains that “When this Bald Eagle missed on its attempt to grab this prairie dog, the prairie dog jumped towards the eagle and startled it long enough to escape to a nearby burrow.” 

Spectrum Photo Creatures in the Air Award

Creatures in the Air Award and People's Choice Award winner: John Speirs with their picture "I guess summer's over."
Creatures in the Air Award and People’s Choice Award winner: John Speirs with their picture “I guess summer’s over.”
“I was taking pics of pigeons in flight when this leaf landed on the bird’s face.” John Speirs/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

John Speirs won both the “Creatures in the Air Award” and the “People’s Choice Award” for this photo of a pigeon getting smacked in the face with a leaf. It’s called “I Guess Summer’s Over,” and I think most folks reading this can probably relate. 

Creatures Under the Sea Award

Creatures Under the Sea Award winner: Chee Kee Teo with their picture "Time for school".
Creatures Under the Sea Award winner: Chee Kee Teo with their picture “Time for school.”
“A smooth-coated otter ‘bit’ its baby otter to bring it back to and fro for a swimming lesson.” Chee Kee Teo/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Chee Kee Teo picked up the top prize in the “Creatures Under the Sea” category for this hysterical shot of a smooth-coated otter hauling its baby “to and fro for a swimming lesson.”

Amazing Internet Portfolio Award

Amazing Internet Portfolio Award winner: Vicki Jauron with their picture "The Joy of a Mud Bath."
Amazing Internet Portfolio Award winner: Vicki Jauron with their picture “The Joy of a Mud Bath.”
“An elephant expresses his joy in taking a mud bath against the dead trees on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zimbabwe on a hot afternoon.” Vicki Jauron/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Vicki Jauron was awarded the “Portfolio” prize for this series of shots of an elephant having the time of its life while taking a mud bath on the shore of Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe. (It actually makes me want to try one!)

How to enter next year’s contest

Highly commended winner: Andy Parkinson with their picture "Let's dance.
Highly commended winner: Andy Parkinson with their picture “Let’s dance.”
“Two Kamchatka bear cubs square up for a celebratory play fight having successfully navigated a raging torrent (small stream!)” Andy Parkinson/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Next year’s Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards will open for entrants in spring, 2022. If it’s like this year, it will be free to enter with prizes provided by the sponsors. 

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The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced

The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced

Ouch!

 

The funniest and most popular photography competition in the world – The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021 has reached its conclusion and is proud to announce that the Overall Winner of this year’s competition is Ken Jensen, a keen amateur photographer from Blackburn for his amazing photograph entitled ‘Ouch!’

The Competition Winners were revealed on BBC’s ‘The One Show’ in front of millions of viewers, a first for the competition that has seen its popularity grow and grow despite only being created 7 years ago. Up against 7,000 hilarious entries from across the globe, Ken’s image of a Golden Silk Monkey, looking a little more than uncomfortable, just pipped the others photos to the top title.

 

Otters

 

The winning image was captured on the bridge that runs over the river Xun in the Lonsheng Gorge, Yunnan, in China during a family holiday in 2016. The monkeys roam freely in the forest area, playing on the bridge in family groups and are very inquisitive of humans and not at all shy. This particular male monkey was actually showing a sign of aggression as he sat on one of the supporting wires, but as Ken’s fabulous shot shows – timing is everything.

Commenting on the good news, Ken said: “I was absolutely overwhelmed to learn that my entry had won, especially when there were quite a number of wonderful photos entered. The publicity that my image has received over the last few months has been incredible, it is such a great feeling to know that one’s image is making people smile globally as well as helping to support some fantastically worthwhile conservation causes.

I would like to say a really big thank you to everyone who has enjoyed or voted for my image and would also like to thank the competition organisers without whom it would not have been possible. And I absolutely love the trophy!

Finally, I want to thank my wife Min, for the support and encouragement that she provides in my photography adventures.”

 

Ninja Prairie Dog

 

As 2021 Comedy Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Ken wins a once in a lifetime safari in the Masai Mara, Kenya, with Alex Walker’s Serian, a unique handmade trophy from the Wonder Workshop in Tanzania, a photography bag from THINK TANK and a Goofie Bag brimming with goodies.

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards was co-founded in 2015 by professional photographers Paul Joynson-Hicks MBE and Tom Sullam who wanted to create a competition that focused on the lighter side of wildlife photography and help promote wildlife conservation through humour. This year, the competition is supporting Save Wild Orangutans by donating 10% of its total net revenue to the charity. The initiative safeguards wild orangutans in and around Gunung Palung National Park, Borneo.

 

Fish jumping

 

The Animals of the Land Category Award was won by Arthur Trevino with ‘Ninja Prairie Dog’ for his stunning photo of a majestic bald eagle seemingly being startled and deterred by a brave little prairie dog. Arthur has confirmed the dog managed to flee to fight another day.

Other category winners included Chee Kee Teo’s hilarious shot ‘Time for School’ of a smooth-coated young otter and his mother that took Creatures of the Water Award. Chee has captured a very bemused expression (familiar to all parents worldwide) as mum encourages the youngster to get into the water. Vicki Jauron, a regular entrant to the competition was awarded the Portfolio Award for ‘The Joys of a Mud Bath’ a series of 4 wonderful images depicting a playful young elephant having fun in the mud in Matusadona Park, Zimbabwe. This year, the winner of the Video Category Award was Rahul Lakhmani whose awesome clip entitled ‘Hugging Best Friend after Lockdown’ shows a white-throated Kingfisher in Delhi swooping in topple another one, in what looks like an over-enthusiastic hug!

 

Racoons

 

In addition to the Category Winners, there were 10 entries that were recognised as Highly Commended Winners: Andy Parkinson, Chu Han Lin, David Eppley, Gurumoorthy K, Jakub Hodan, Jan Piecha, Lea Scaddan, Nicolas de Vaulx, Pal Marchhart and Roland Kranitz.

For more information, visit the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards website. 

 

The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced 1

 

Pigeon

 

The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced 2

 

Elephant

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Enter Our ‘Nature & Wildlife’ Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More!

Enter Our 'Nature & Wildlife' Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More!

We’ve teamed up with parrotprint.com to give you the chance of winning parrotprint.com canvas prints, a drone and/or an Adobe creative cloud photography plan.

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Competitions

Enter Our 'Nature & Wildlife' Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More! 3

 

We have a brand-new photography competition, sponsored by our friends parrotprint.com, who are giving you the chance to win canvas prints and more! To be in with a chance of winning one of the following prize bundles, we want to see your best ‘Nature & Wildlife’ photos. 

The Prizes Up For Grabs Are: 

More information on how to enter and what prizes are up for grabs can be found below. 

 

How Do I Enter?

To be in with a chance of winning one of these great prizes, we want to see images that fit the theme: ‘Nature & Wildlife’. Think local wildlife, pets or more exotic animals who don’t reside in the UK. Black & White, full colour… any format goes so long as it fits the theme.

Simply submit your photos over in our competition forum before midnight on 30 November 2021 for the chance to win one of the top prizes Calibrite are giving away. 

Enter Now

 

Closing Date & Entry Details 

The competition closes at midnight on 30 November 2021. Entries added after this time will not be counted. 2 entries are allowed for free members and up to 4 entries are allowed for Plus members. Anyone who submits more images than they are allowed to will be disqualified. Entries posted on the bottom of this article will not be counted! Please use the competition forum topic.

 

More On The Prizes Up For Grabs…

 

Creating your own beautiful canvas prints has never been easier! You’ll love your custom canvas print from parrotprint.com. Whatever you need, whatever your budget, parrotprint.com will turn your digital photos into vibrant, eye-catching works of art on canvas.

“Creating a canvas for your wall couldn’t be any easier than it is with parrotprint.com and delivery is so quick, your postman will be knocking on your door the next day,” ePHOTOzine in our review. 

parrotprint.com offers free, fast next-day delivery, unbeatable prices, an easy-to-use order process and print quality you can trust in. Plus, customer feedback is great with Mystery Shopper even saying they stand out as a favourite. 

 

Good Luck!

 

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By entering the competition, entrants agree to be bound by the rules and by any other requirements set out on ePHOTOzine.

  • The following people are excluded from entering the competition: (1) Direct and indirect employees, staff and their relatives of the supplier of the prize or prizes (2) The publishers of ePHOTOzine (3) Advertisers or sponsors of ePHOTOzine.
  • Only two entries per competition are allowed per free member, 4 entries are allowed per Plus member.
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  • One winning entry will be chosen, by an ePHOTOzine or guest judge. This will be the image which, in the judge’s opinion is the most original and of the highest quality and meets the theme. The judge’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  • ePHOTOzine reserves the right to disqualify incomplete or illegal entries.
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  • The deadline for entering the competition is midnight (GMT) on the last day of the calendar month in which the competition is being held unless otherwise stated.
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  • The winner must acknowledge his or her win within three weeks of being notified via email or the prize may be re-allocated to the next-placed winner.
  • All entrants agree that their name and images can be displayed and used in promotion for future competitions on ePHOTOzine. The winning entry may be used by the sponsor as a promotional image. The terms of this would be agreed with ePHOTOzine and the sponsor before the prize is announced. By entering the competition you have confirmed you have authorised this.
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  • We reserve the right to modify these rules without notice. (Last modified: 8 Apr 2020)

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Best Wildlife Photography Settings for Beginners

What are the best walk-around settings for wildlife photography? Perhaps you just bought your first camera and want to photograph some wildlife. Or, maybe you’ve been struggling with capturing crisp and properly exposed images of wildlife for a while, and you need some guidance. If that sounds like you, read on!

Photographing wildlife can be a real challenge. Animals have sporadic movements, an affinity for low-light conditions, and (literally) minds of their own. Almost anyone with a camera has dabbled in wildlife photography at some point. But good results can be scarce at first, and many photographers don’t go any further in the genre.

That’s why I wrote this article. Today, I will introduce you to the proper walk-around settings for beginning wildlife photographers to ensure you capture images you can be proud of. I’ve covered shooting modes, autofocus modes, and how to optimize your settings to take better wildlife pictures.

Challenges of Wildlife Photography

What makes wildlife photography difficult? For starters, most animals you’ll encounter are moving subjects. Birds are almost always on the move, bugs will sway on a leaf in the wind, or a coyote could be on its morning prowl. This is why it’s so important to shoot with a fast shutter speed so that your images are not blurry due to motion blur.

The second challenge is that, by definition, wildlife is wild. The animal you’re photographing may not decide to stand in the perfect spot for a photo. Or, it could suddenly face away from you or change direction entirely. You need to be aware of these possibilities when setting up your composition and autofocus settings, or you risk poor framing and out-of-focus images.

Thirdly, it’s often dark when wildlife is the most active. For many animals, the best time to photograph them is early in the morning or during the last hours of twilight. Even if you find a good subject during the middle of the day, the animal may be in a forest or burrow where the ambient light level is low. In low light, you’ll be straining your camera settings in order to properly expose the image.

Bobcat kitten in shadow, taken with Olympus camera
I was lucky enough to stumble upon this bobcat kitten. It was important to get out of there quickly to not further disrupt the den. Luckily, I had all my settings ready so I was able to capture this quick shot of its face before it retreated into the crevice and before it was time for me to leave. ISO 640, 1/320, f/6.3

There are other challenges when photographing wildlife, too, but those are the three that I find the most important to keep in mind.

Recommended Camera Settings

In photography, three camera settings determine how bright your image will be: shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. (Flash intensity is another, but flash photography is a more advanced topic in wildlife photography that needs an article of its own – and many wildlife subjects are too far away for flash to be helpful in the first place.)

The optimal settings depend on the ambient light level when you’re taking pictures. Generally speaking, low light requires a longer shutter speed, wider aperture, and higher ISO. Bright ambient light allows you to use a faster shutter speed, narrower aperture, and lower ISO.

Let’s dive into exactly how each of these factors affects your exposure and other aspects of the image.

1. Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is the amount of time your camera allows light to hit the sensor and expose the image. We’ve covered it in detail before if you want to refresh your memory.

Most cameras can be set to have fast shutter speeds like 1/4000 of a second, as  well as long shutter speeds like 30 seconds. The faster your shutter speed, the less light that hits your camera sensor, which puts you at risk of underexposure. But it also allows you to freeze movement.

This doesn’t just include the movement of your subject, but also camera shake caused by handholding the camera. With fast-moving subjects and telephoto lenses (which magnify shake), wildlife photography is the perfect storm that requires a fast shutter speed.

Personally, I try to stick to 1/250th of a second for wildlife photography, and faster (sometimes even 1/1000 second or 1/2000 second) if my subject is moving very quickly. With too long of a shutter speed, like 1/60 second, you’ll start to need a tripod in order to eliminate camera shake, and a moving subject would not turn out sharp.

2. Aperture

Aperture is the size of the opening in your lens and how much light it can gather. It looks like this:

Aperture - f/4 vs f/16

You can read our full article on aperture if you aren’t familiar with it, but the basic idea is this. The larger the aperture, the more light you capture. That’s why a large aperture is such a useful feature in wildlife photography.

As you may have heard before, your aperture value is written in f-stops. If you set your camera to an f-stop of around f/2 or f/2.8, it means that the aperture blades in your lens are open fairly wide, capturing a lot of light. As you jump the f-stop to higher numbers like f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, and so on, it means that you are closing the aperture blades more and more, which results in much less light being captured.

Aperture is very important in wildlife photography not just because of how much light it captures, but also because of depth of field. At wide apertures like f/2.8, your photos will have a “shallow focus” effect where only your subject is sharp, and the foreground and background are out of focus. At narrower apertures like f/11 and f/16, depth of field increases. This changes the look and feel of a photo, so it’s important to get your aperture right.

3. ISO

ISO is the third camera setting that changes how bright and dark your photo is. However, unlike shutter speed and aperture, changing the ISO doesn’t actually capture more or less light. Instead, it’s a lot more similar to changing a photo’s brightness in post-processing software like Photoshop.

So, even though higher ISO values will brighten your photo, it’s not a magic solution to shooting in low light. You’ll notice that if you set too high of an ISO instead of capturing enough light in the first place, your photos will turn out very grainy and noisy, with strange colors and a lot less detail.

What ISO values should you use for wildlife photography? My recommendation is to stick to ISO values between about ISO 100 (best image quality) and 800 (acceptable image quality) with most entry-level cameras. Even cameras that are 10+ years old can still produce usable images up to about ISO 800. Some of the newest full-frame cameras still look good up to ISO 3200 or 6400.

But whenever you have the choice, it’s best to avoid having the boost the ISO too high. Take a look at your shutter speed and aperture and see if you can capture more light in the first place. Maybe you’ll notice that you’ve programmed a shutter speed of 1/2000 second when you could easily get away with 1/500 second (capturing four times as many light) and a substantially lower ISO.

I recommend doing some test photos at different ISO values to see what looks acceptable on your camera. Sometimes, we are forced to push the ISO higher than is ideal and settle for a slightly grainy image. But that’s still better than getting a blurry subject because your shutter speed is too long.

If your camera doesn’t have a designated ISO button, I recommend making one of your customizable buttons your ISO control. You want fast access to changing your ISO because you will find yourself changing it frequently. 

Egret at sunset shot with fast shutterspeed high iso correct camera settings for wildlife photography
In this image, I pushed the limits of the ISO capabilities of my Panasonic DMC-G2, which has an older micro four-thirds sensor. A close look will reveal more grain (AKA image noise) than I’d like. But I was already pushing shutter speed and aperture as far as possible, so it was a necessary tradeoff. ISO 800, 1/160, f/5.6

Combining the Three

Now for how these factors relate to each other. A properly exposed image is produced when shutter speed, aperture, and ISO are balanced with the ambient light. In darker environments, shutter speed must be longer, aperture must be wider, and ISO must be higher. In brighter situations, you have a lot more flexibility to use a faster shutter speed, narrower aperture, and lower ISO.

In any light level, there’s not just one combination that results in a well-lit image. In fact, there is a wide range of combinations that can properly expose the image. The challenge is to find a combination that eliminates unwanted motion blur, provides the right depth of field, and doesn’t capture excess noise.

In wildlife photography, the priority is usually to have a fast shutter speed. This is because the subjects are frequently moving, plus we are often zoomed in, which magnifies any camera shake in the first place. The most common cause of a blurry wildlife photo is too long of a shutter speed.

Camera Shooting Modes

With most entry-level cameras, you will have the option to shoot in automatic mode, shutter speed priority, aperture priority, or manual mode.

In automatic mode, the camera automatically sets shutter speed, aperture, and ISO to properly expose the image. However, it gives you no control and isn’t geared toward photographing wildlife, so I never recommend using it.

In shutter speed priority mode, you manually set the shutter speed and the camera automatically chooses the correct aperture to properly expose the photo (ISO can be manually set or on auto). Aperture priority works the same way except you set the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed. In manual mode, you set all of the settings yourself. 

1. Aperture Priority

The best shooting mode for wildlife photography is aperture priority.

You may wonder, “If I want to prioritize a fast shutter speed, why not shoot shutter speed priority?” The answer is that aperture priority speeds up the process. In low light conditions, you simply set the widest aperture on your lens – something like f/2.8, f/4, or f/5.6 on most wildlife photography lenses – and pay careful attention to where your camera is floating the shutter speed. If the shutter speed gets into dangerously slow territory, just bump up the ISO, and you’ll be good.

For my wildlife photography, I usually set my aperture at f/5.6 (the widest on my lens) and keep it there the whole time. I set my ISO to about 800 in typical lighting conditions, and as the evening progresses and it gets darker, I usually have to increase my ISO to maintain a fast shutter speed.

You can automate this “steadily increase ISO through the evening” process using your camera’s Auto ISO dialogue. Don’t be fooled by “auto” in the name, because it’s an advanced technique that requires you to have full understanding of how shutter speed, aperture, and ISO work. We have covered the Auto ISO process before and why it can be so powerful for wildlife photography.

Elk wildlife photo taken in aperture priority with camera settings that give a sharp photo
I shot this image of an elk using aperture priority, having opened my aperture all the way up to f/5.6, and setting my ISO to 1600. At 1600 ISO, grain is not yet a problem with my current camera. My camera then floated the shutter speed to 1/1250, which was easy to handhold even with a telephoto lens, and fast enough to freeze the gait of the elk.

2. Shutter Speed Priority

Even though shutter speed is so important to wildlife photography, I don’t usually recommend shooting shutter priority. In bright lighting conditions, shutter priority will change your aperture value too much (which can give you the completely wrong depth of field). In dim lighting conditions, you run the risk of the camera pushing the ISO too high if you don’t constantly change your shutter speed.

It’s not the worst mode in the world for wildlife photography and I know that some photographers prefer it, but I like the extra control of aperture priority, not to mention its versatility in different lighting conditions. If you do choose shutter priority, just be careful to watch the aperture and ISO values at all times.

3. Manual

Many wildlife photographers like to shoot in manual mode with Auto ISO. This involves setting your shutter speed to a manageable speed and, in most cases, using the widest aperture on your lens to capture as much light as possible. The camera will then float ISO depending on how the light changes.

This is a perfectly good way to shoot in low-light conditions. However, in bright light, you run the risk of hitting the camera’s ISO floor (like ISO 100) where it can’t go any lower. After that point, if the light gets any brighter, your photos will be overexposed, because the camera has no remaining way to darken them.

Also, I strongly recommend that you do not manually set the ISO as well when you’re in manual mode. If you do, and all three settings are manual, you’ll need to do too much trial-and-error and fiddling with your camera settings constantly. This can cost you precious time when you’re photographing an animal that may not be in the perfect spot for long. 

4. Automatic

Do not use auto mode! If up until now you have been shooting on automatic, this is your sign: it’s time to step up your photography game. Automatic is a wild card because it may not optimize your shutter speed to capture a sharp wildlife subject. It may prioritize a low ISO instead of a fast shutter speed, or it may narrow down your aperture when you desperately need to capture more light. You never know when it will do something funky that results in a suboptimal shutter speed, bad depth of field, or high grain. And worst of all, it takes away your control of how the photo looks.

Exposure Compensation

Although the camera’s aperture priority mode tries to properly expose the scene, wildlife photographers often find ourselves shooting in scenarios with harsh light, as we can’t control the scene. Examples of this are shooting against the sun or upwards into a tree on a backlit subject. Other times, you may be shooting a very bright subject like a white bird against a much darker background. Even though modern cameras are pretty good at metering, these situations can still cause the camera to fail to properly expose your subject. 

To quickly correct any errors, you should take advantage of exposure compensation. This is usually represented by a +/- symbol on the camera. An exposure compensation of +1 will make the image 1 stop brighter (AKA twice as much) compared to how the camera would otherwise expose the image. Likewise, an exposure compensation of -1 makes the image 1 stop darker (half as bright).

baby monkey with harsh light used exposure compensation to properly expose image
When photographing these monkeys against the light, I had to increase my exposure compensation to properly expose the faces of the monkeys. Otherwise, the monkeys would have been too dark. ISO 1000, 1/200, f/8.0.

Often, the camera isn’t going to be that far off, and your exposure compensation adjustments will be fairly minor. I usually only adjust it by +0.3 or -0.3.

But in some scenarios, you’ll have to more drastically adjust the exposure compensation. For example, let’s say I’m shooting a crow up in a tree on an overcast day. The dark crow is in front of some bright clouds. When I review my first shot, I notice the crow is just a black silhouette against some properly exposed clouds. This is because the camera was a little confused and exposed for the clouds instead of the crow. Since I want to be able to see the details of the crow, I bump my exposure compensation up a couple stops to +2. Now when I take the shot, my subject is properly exposed and the background is slightly overexposed.

That’s why it’s useful to have a wide range of exposure compensation values at your disposal. Wildlife photography can fool a lot of cameras, so if you want to prioritize the exposure of your subject, exposure compensation is a very valuable tool.

(I will mention as a final note that exposure compensation is not a variable of exposure on its own. All it does is shift shutter speed, aperture, or ISO in order to change the exposure.)

Autofocus Modes

Along with motion blur, the other most common cause of blurry wildlife photos is missed focus. The best way to understand your camera’s focus system is to practice, but I also recommend relying less on the automatic focus modes and giving yourself more manual control.

1. Single Point vs Wide Area Autofocus

Exactly how to set your autofocus depends on your camera model. They all have different options, so I’ll make my recommendations more general in nature.

First, I recommend using a small autofocus box rather than a large one. Many cameras have an Auto Area Autofocus mode, where the camera decides on what it “thinks” your subject is in the photo and tries to focus on it. I hope I don’t have to explain why that’s a problem!

Another common mode is Wide Area Autofocus – a large box that you can position in your frame, at which point the camera will focus on something in the box (usually the nearest object). The problem with wide area autofocus is that it doesn’t always pick your subject out of the box. Often, we are shooting through vegetation, which will attract the attention of the focus system. The camera will end up focusing on some blade of grass or leaf instead of your subject’s face.

The option I prefer is a small autofocus box that you can position across the frame. Whatever it’s called on your camera, the key is that the camera will focus on whatever is in the little box. While you do give up some speed since you need to move the box to the perfect spot, you’ll end up getting sharper photos in the end, where the camera focuses on the subject instead of its surroundings.

In some autofocus modes, the camera can lock onto your initial subject and then track it around the frame. In others, you must manually move around the focus point as your subject moves. You’ll want to test out both approaches to see which one gives you quicker and more consistent results. I personally favor moving the box around manually much more than some wildlife photographers, so I often stay away from the tracking modes. But if you shoot very fast-moving subjects like birds in flight, you may find that autofocus tracking is a lifesaver.

Either way, you should make sure you can quickly change your autofocus point when you need to. It may be possible to assign one of your camera’s custom buttons to turn autofocus tracking on and off. Refer to your camera manual and spend some time practicing to figure out which technique you prefer.

mot mot eating a lizard, sharp photo taken with single point autofocus setting
I used single-point autofocus and turned tracking off while photographing this Mot Mot eating a lizard. In different autofocus modes, the camera could have focused on the twigs in the foreground instead of the bird. Or, with tracking on, it could have misinterpreted my subject and tracked something across the frame even even though the bird was staying in one spot. ISO 640, 1/125, f/5.

Single vs Continuous Servo Autofocus

Your camera likely has the option of AF-S (single-servo autofocus) or AF-C (continuous-servo autofocus). When shooting with continuous autofocus, your camera will keep refocusing constantly so long as you hold down your focusing button. Whereas in single-servo autofocus, the camera will only engage autofocus once each time you press the focusing button.

Continuous servo can be useful for rapidly moving subjects such as flying birds. But, like autofocus tracking, I find that it is often overused by wildlife photographers. In my experience, AF-C often ends up racking focus too far and misfocusing when your subject is staying pretty still, getting stuck in an out-of-focus state. AF-S provides more certainty that your camera will focus exactly where you want.

Even though wildlife is constantly on the move, most animals also spend a lot of time waiting or resting in one particular spot. Continuous autofocus is a good idea when your subject is truly going wild, but don’t discount single-servo AF for day-to-day wildlife photography. You may find that it gives you better results overall.

Conclusion

I hope you now have a better understanding of how shutter speed, aperture and ISO affect your exposure, and how to best optimize these settings for wildlife photography. I also hope that my autofocus tips gave you something to think about.

To sum everything up, I recommend shooting in aperture priority mode. In low light, set your aperture as wide as possible, and bump up your ISO until your shutter speeds are fast enough for your subject (meaning at least 1/250 for a lot of wildlife). In brighter situations, you have the luxury of lowering the ISO and getting better image quality. Lastly, if your images are still turning out slightly too dark or bright, you can use exposure compensation to correct for that error.

As for autofocus, use a small focusing box so that you have control over where your camera focuses. And keep in mind that you don’t always need to use continuous-servo autofocus with full subject tracking around the frame; single-servo can often do a better job if your subject isn’t moving too fast. 

With these settings, you will be able to photograph active wildlife in suboptimal lighting conditions and still get results you can be proud of.

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Marsel van Oosten: how to add context to your wildlife subjects

oxpecker marsel van oosten

November 9, 2021

Marsel van Oosten explains how the main subject of your wildlife pictures can be put in context, even if they’re not the biggest creatures in the frame


Marsel van Oosten

Marsel van Oosten: how to add context to your wildlife subjects 4
Marsel van Oosten was born in The Netherlands and worked as an art director for 15 years. He switched careers to become a photographer and has since won Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Travel Photographer of the Year. He’s a regular contributor to National Geographic and runs nature photography tours around the world. Visit www.squiver.com. In this article, he explains how you can add context to your wildlife subjects.

When you think about wildlife photographers, and the gear they use, you immediately think of huge telephoto lenses. As much as they’d want to, wildlife photographers usually can’t photograph their subjects with a wideangle lens because the wildlife would run away if they tried… or you could die trying.

When you’re photographing an elephant seal, a rhino or a polar bear, you might get away with a short lens and still get the main subject at a recognisable size in the frame. But, especially with smaller subjects, you need a lot more focal length to get them to show up at a decent size in the image.

This is one of the reasons why I prefer to photograph large mammals – they enable me to use shorter lenses and that means I can include a fair amount of the habitat. My favourite wildlife images are so-called ‘animalscapes’, so the habitat is very important to me and I don’t always want to reduce everything to a blur.

Yet that almost inevitably happens when you’re using long telephoto lenses – the longer the lens, the more shallow your depth of field. This is also why I don’t photograph birds much… most of the time the habitat is reduced to a few branches and leaves, and the backgrounds tend to be a smooth blur. From a purely artistic point of view, this doesn’t excite me much.

giraffe silhouette, red-billed oxpeckers

The tower, Botswana. This giraffe was annoyed by the red-billed oxpeckers that were harassing it. Every now and then it would violently shake its head, which made the birds fly off, only to return a few seconds later Nikon D850, 180-400mm f/4 lens, 1/400sec at f/5.6, ISO 200

When I photograph small subjects, like birds, I’m always looking for ways to include as much of the habitat as possible and, ideally, in a not-so-obvious way. These two images both show oxpeckers in their natural habitat and you could argue whether the oxpeckers are actually the main subject – after all, they are much smaller than the other subjects.

The image with the Cape buffalo started as a buffalo image when I stumbled across it in the Okavango Delta in Botswana. It was covered in drying mud and I was captivated by the monochromatic feel and by the wonderful texture. I started shooting relatively wide, then kept framing it tighter and tighter until I only had the head inside the frame.

It was pretty cool, but something was missing. I started thinking about alternatives and then noticed the oxpeckers hopping from buffalo to buffalo. That’s when I previsualised an image where the buffalo would not be the main subject, but a monochromatic background for the bird.

When analysing my frame I realised that, in order to eliminate distracting highlights and really use the buffalo as a ‘wallpaper’, I needed to go even tighter and get rid of everything that wasn’t a buffalo. That gave me a very nice frame in which the buffalo’s horn was the perfect perch for an oxpecker. From then on, it was just a matter of patience and waiting for it to materialise.

When it did, I shot many images to capture the different poses of the bird. In one of the frames the eyes of the buffalo were closed, and that turned out to be perfect. Our eyes are always drawn to other eyes, so when there are eyes in your photo people can’t resist looking at them. In this case I thought that would just be a distraction.

oxpecker marsel van oosten

The beauty and the beast, Botswana. Oxpeckers are after the ticks on their hosts so, originally, they were thought to be an example of mutualism – interaction between individuals of different species that results in positive effects for each. However, evidence suggests oxpeckers are actually parasites Nikon D810, 600mm f/4 lens, 1/1250sec at f/5.6, ISO 320

These buffalo are always followed by oxpeckers, who are after the ticks on the buffalo so usually are around. But also there’s usually quite a few buffalo, so they might not always be on the buffalo that you’re photographing. The name ‘oxpecker’ already implies that it’s not rare to see one on a buffalo.

But you have to try to come up with an idea of how you’re going to photograph this. For example, am I going to leave enough space so that I can see background, that I see trees or sky in the background, or am I going to go close? And, if I go close, how close and where do
I want the bird? For me, this was just the perfect spot in the image for the bird to be.

The other image could be about the oxpeckers or it could be about the giraffe. I like to think it’s about the oxpeckers and the giraffe is just a massive perch. It was shot at sunrise. Usually, in Africa, the sunrises can be very colourful but the colour doesn’t last long. In the afternoons you get a bit more colour because by that time it’s much warmer, there’s more haze and more dust in the air.

Again, the oxpeckers are resting on this giraffe to check constantly for ticks. The moment I have two images next to each other that both feature oxpeckers then, suddenly, the oxpeckers become the subject.


Further reading

Marsel van Oosten: how to pre-visualise a photograph

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National Geographic Showcases “50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs”

Photo of a crocodile tail by Nick Nichols

A new exhibition called “National Geographic: 50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs” is making its way around the country and by the looks of some of the photos from the show (which we’ve included in this story), it should live up to its billing. The exhibition is curated by National Geographic Deputy Photo Editor Kathy Moran and features the best of the best wildlife images from that legendary publication.

The show includes the work of some of National Geographic’s most iconic photographers such as Michael “Nick” Nichols, Steve Winter, Paul Nicklen, Beverly Joubert, David Doubilet and more. The image at the top of this story showing a crocodile tail at the Zakouma National Park in Chad was captured by Nichols.

Photo of a whale by Thomas Peschak
A tourist on a boat in Laguna San Ignacio reaches into the water in the hope of petting one of many gray whales that frequent the bay to mate and care for their young. Photo by Thomas P. Peschak, courtesy of “National Geographic: 50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs.”

Along with spotlighting these incredible wildlife images, “National Geographic: 50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs” is meant to showcase the evolution of nature photography itself including “how innovations such as camera traps, remote imaging, and underwater technology have granted photographers access to wildlife in their natural habitat,” according to ArtfixDaily.

The traveling exhibition is currently on view at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Wyoming until April 24, 2022.

Photo of a Polar Bear by Paul Nicklen
A Kermode bear eats a fish in a moss-draped rain forest. Photo by Paul Nicklen, courtesy of “National Geographic: 50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs.”

“A distinctive element of the exhibition is that each photograph on display was taken in a natural environment,” the museum said in a statement. “None of the images were taken in permanent captivity or through the use of baiting techniques. After viewing these spectacular photographs, visitors will be compelled to take action to protect these animals and join National Geographic in its endeavor to achieve a planet in balance.”

Photo of an orangutan by Tim Laman
Tempted by the fruit of a strangler fig, a Bornean orangutan climbs 100 feet into the canopy. Photo by Tim Laman, courtesy of “National Geographic: 50 Greatest Wildlife Photographs.”

“For 115 years, National Geographic has pioneered and championed the art of wildlife photography, and captivated generations of engaged audiences with a steady stream of extraordinary images of animals in nature,” National Geographic said.

“From the very first such image to appear – a reindeer in 1903 – National Geographic Society’s publications have broken new ground and push the bar higher again and again, establishing an unmatched legacy of artistic, scientific, and technical achievement.”

You can find out more about the show on National Geographic’s website.

Via Great Reads in Photography

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Enter Our ‘Nature & Wildlife’ Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More!

Enter Our 'Nature & Wildlife' Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More!

We’ve teamed up with parrotprint.com to give you the chance of winning parrotprint.com canvas prints, a drone and/or an Adobe creative cloud photography plan.

| 
Competitions

Enter Our 'Nature & Wildlife' Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More! 5

 

We have a brand-new photography competition, sponsored by our friends parrotprint.com, who are giving you the chance to win canvas prints and more! To be in with a chance of winning one of the following prize bundles, we want to see your best ‘Nature & Wildlife’ photos. 

The Prizes Up For Grabs Are: 

More information on how to enter and what prizes are up for grabs can be found below. 

 

How Do I Enter?

To be in with a chance of winning one of these great prizes, we want to see images that fit the theme: ‘Nature & Wildlife’. Think local wildlife, pets or more exotic animals who don’t reside in the UK. Black & White, full colour… any format goes so long as it fits the theme.

Simply submit your photos over in our competition forum before midnight on 30 November 2021 for the chance to win one of the top prizes Calibrite are giving away. 

Enter Now

 

Closing Date & Entry Details 

The competition closes at midnight on 30 November 2021. Entries added after this time will not be counted. 2 entries are allowed for free members and up to 4 entries are allowed for Plus members. Anyone who submits more images than they are allowed to will be disqualified. Entries posted on the bottom of this article will not be counted! Please use the competition forum topic.

 

More On The Prizes Up For Grabs…

 

Creating your own beautiful canvas prints has never been easier! You’ll love your custom canvas print from parrotprint.com. Whatever you need, whatever your budget, parrotprint.com will turn your digital photos into vibrant, eye-catching works of art on canvas.

“Creating a canvas for your wall couldn’t be any easier than it is with parrotprint.com and delivery is so quick, your postman will be knocking on your door the next day,” ePHOTOzine in our review. 

parrotprint.com offers free, fast next-day delivery, unbeatable prices, an easy-to-use order process and print quality you can trust in. Plus, customer feedback is great with Mystery Shopper even saying they stand out as a favourite. 

 

Good Luck!

 

T&Cs:

By entering the competition, entrants agree to be bound by the rules and by any other requirements set out on ePHOTOzine.

  • The following people are excluded from entering the competition: (1) Direct and indirect employees, staff and their relatives of the supplier of the prize or prizes (2) The publishers of ePHOTOzine (3) Advertisers or sponsors of ePHOTOzine.
  • Only two entries per competition are allowed per free member, 4 entries are allowed per Plus member.
  • We reserve the right to remove images that have not been submitted correctly, ie too small. There isn’t a maximum file size or dimension restriction for entries.
  • All entries must be submitted through the ePHOTOzine competition forum web page and will not be accepted via any other means, eg, post, fax or e-mail.
  • No responsibility is accepted for incomplete entries due to server error or other causes beyond our control.
  • One winning entry will be chosen, by an ePHOTOzine or guest judge. This will be the image which, in the judge’s opinion is the most original and of the highest quality and meets the theme. The judge’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  • ePHOTOzine reserves the right to disqualify incomplete or illegal entries.
  • The prize winner will receive the prize as featured in the corresponding month’s competition. There is no cash alternative to the prize as stated.
  • This competition is open to UK entries only. Those based outside the UK can enter if they have a UK address that the prize can be sent to, such as that of a friend or relative. Please update your portfolio with the UK address. 
  • The deadline for entering the competition is midnight (GMT) on the last day of the calendar month in which the competition is being held unless otherwise stated.
  • The winner or winners will be notified by e-mail within 28 days of the end of the competition. The winner’s details will be posted on ePHOTOzine within 28 days of the end of the competition.
  • The winner must acknowledge his or her win within three weeks of being notified via email or the prize may be re-allocated to the next-placed winner.
  • All entrants agree that their name and images can be displayed and used in promotion for future competitions on ePHOTOzine. The winning entry may be used by the sponsor as a promotional image. The terms of this would be agreed with ePHOTOzine and the sponsor before the prize is announced. By entering the competition you have confirmed you have authorised this.
  • The name of the winner may be published on ePHOTOzine after he or she has acknowledged their win.
  • We reserve the right not to hold a competition in any given month.
  • ePHOTOzine only provides the means of entry to the competition and does not normally supply the competition prizes. The sponsors are therefore liable for the prize.
  • We reserve the right to modify these rules without notice. (Last modified: 8 Apr 2020)


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Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
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Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Enter Out ‘Nature & Wildlife’ Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More!

Enter Out 'Nature & Wildlife' Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More!

We’ve teamed up with parrotprint.com to give you the chance of winning parrotprint.com canvas prints, a drone and/or an Adobe creative cloud photography plan.

| 
Competitions

Enter Out 'Nature & Wildlife' Photography Competition To Win Canvas Prints & More! 6

 

We have a brand-new photography competition, sponsored by our friends parrotprint.com, who are giving you the chance to win canvas prints and more! To be in with a chance of winning one of the following prize bundles, we want to see your best ‘Nature & Wildlife’ photos. 

The Prizes Up For Grabs Are: 

More information on how to enter and what prizes are up for grabs can be found below. 

 

How Do I Enter?

To be in with a chance of winning one of these great prizes, we want to see images that fit the theme: ‘Nature & Wildlife’. Think local wildlife, pets or more exotic animals who don’t reside in the UK. Black & White, full colour… any format goes so long as it fits the theme.

Simply submit your photos over in our competition forum before midnight on 30 November 2021 for the chance to win one of the top prizes Calibrite are giving away. 

Enter Now

 

Closing Date & Entry Details 

The competition closes at midnight on 30 November 2021. Entries added after this time will not be counted. 2 entries are allowed for free members and up to 4 entries are allowed for Plus members. Anyone who submits more images than they are allowed to will be disqualified. Entries posted on the bottom of this article will not be counted! Please use the competition forum topic.

 

More On The Prizes Up For Grabs…

 

Creating your own beautiful canvas prints has never been easier! You’ll love your custom canvas print from parrotprint.com. Whatever you need, whatever your budget, parrotprint.com will turn your digital photos into vibrant, eye-catching works of art on canvas.

“Creating a canvas for your wall couldn’t be any easier than it is with parrotprint.com and delivery is so quick, your postman will be knocking on your door the next day,” ePHOTOzine in our review. 

parrotprint.com offers free, fast next-day delivery, unbeatable prices, an easy-to-use order process and print quality you can trust in. Plus, customer feedback is great with Mystery Shopper even saying they stand out as a favourite. 

 

Good Luck!

 

T&Cs:

By entering the competition, entrants agree to be bound by the rules and by any other requirements set out on ePHOTOzine.

  • The following people are excluded from entering the competition: (1) Direct and indirect employees, staff and their relatives of the supplier of the prize or prizes (2) The publishers of ePHOTOzine (3) Advertisers or sponsors of ePHOTOzine.
  • Only two entries per competition are allowed per free member, 4 entries are allowed per Plus member.
  • We reserve the right to remove images that have not been submitted correctly, ie too small. There isn’t a maximum file size or dimension restriction for entries.
  • All entries must be submitted through the ePHOTOzine competition forum web page and will not be accepted via any other means, eg, post, fax or e-mail.
  • No responsibility is accepted for incomplete entries due to server error or other causes beyond our control.
  • One winning entry will be chosen, by an ePHOTOzine or guest judge. This will be the image which, in the judge’s opinion is the most original and of the highest quality and meets the theme. The judge’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  • ePHOTOzine reserves the right to disqualify incomplete or illegal entries.
  • The prize winner will receive the prize as featured in the corresponding month’s competition. There is no cash alternative to the prize as stated.
  • This competition is open to UK entries only. Those based outside the UK can enter if they have a UK address that the prize can be sent to, such as that of a friend or relative. Please update your portfolio with the UK address. 
  • The deadline for entering the competition is midnight (GMT) on the last day of the calendar month in which the competition is being held unless otherwise stated.
  • The winner or winners will be notified by e-mail within 28 days of the end of the competition. The winner’s details will be posted on ePHOTOzine within 28 days of the end of the competition.
  • The winner must acknowledge his or her win within three weeks of being notified via email or the prize may be re-allocated to the next-placed winner.
  • All entrants agree that their name and images can be displayed and used in promotion for future competitions on ePHOTOzine. The winning entry may be used by the sponsor as a promotional image. The terms of this would be agreed with ePHOTOzine and the sponsor before the prize is announced. By entering the competition you have confirmed you have authorised this.
  • The name of the winner may be published on ePHOTOzine after he or she has acknowledged their win.
  • We reserve the right not to hold a competition in any given month.
  • ePHOTOzine only provides the means of entry to the competition and does not normally supply the competition prizes. The sponsors are therefore liable for the prize.
  • We reserve the right to modify these rules without notice. (Last modified: 8 Apr 2020)


MPB Start Shopping

Support this site by making a Donation, purchasing Plus Membership, or shopping with one of our affiliates:
Amazon UK,
Amazon US,
Amazon CA,
ebay UK

It doesn’t cost you anything extra when you use these links, but it does support the site, helping keep ePHOTOzine free to use, thank you.

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Behind the Scenes of a Wildlife Shoot With the New Nikon Z 9 in Svalbard

Behind the Scenes of a Wildlife Shoot With the New Nikon Z 9 in Svalbard

The new Nikon mirrorless body is put through its paces halfway between Norway and the North Pole. How can it handle these grueling and photographically testing conditions?

Norway is one of my favorite countries on earth, though its weather is not for the faint of heart. With dark, ice-cold winters lasting months on end, it can be tricky for landscape photographers to capture much on the face of it, but Norway has so much to offer. Svalbard is a group of islands north of Norway. There is a lot of interesting details about this seemingly barren tundra: for example, you do not need a visa to get in — anyone can move there if they wish — and it’s home to more polar bears than people. As a result of the latter, whenever your party goes out of the town’s perimeter, somebody must have a rifle; it’s a dangerous place.

Nevertheless, it’s near the top of my list of places I desperately want to visit and so I was pleased to see that it’s where Morten Hilmer was sent by Nikon to test their new flagship mirrorless body, the Z 9. This beautiful behind-the-scenes of that assignment is a relaxing and enjoyable watch, and I was pleased to see Hilmer not being precious with the Z 9 as he gets down in the snow and the mud with it. This isn’t a review of the Z 9, but rather an excellent demonstration of what it can do in the right hands in even the most difficult of conditions.

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Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 7

Photographer Angel Fitor has been awarded the prestigious “Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021” title for his serene jellyfish photograph, which he hopes will raise awareness of ecological disasters that affect marine life.

European Wildlife Photographer of the Year, one of the most renowned competitions for nature photography, is run by the German Society for Nature Photography (GDT).

This year, the panel of judges had to look through over 19,000 submitted photos from 36 countries to crown winners across eight major categories: “Birds,” “Mammals,” “Other Animals,” “Plants and Fungi,” “Landscapes,” “The Underwater World,” “People and Nature,” and “Nature’s Studio.”

In addition, the next generation of photographers were awarded in the “Young Photographers up to 14 years” and “Young Photographers 15-17 years” categories. For nature photography stories, portfolios, and projects, the contest awards what is called the Fritz Pölking Prize.

Same as last year, the competition award ceremony took place online and all the winning photos will go on a tour to be exhibited in Germany and Europe, with the German Horse Museum in Verden as the first venue to hold the exhibition on December 7, 2021.

The competition shared a prize pool worth €32,000 ($37,400) with the overall winner taking home €3,000 ($3,500) and Olympus as the main sponsor of the contest.

European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 8
Photo by Angel Fitor | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

The overall winner and the recipient of the “European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021” title is Spanish photographer, photojournalist, and author Angel Fitor. His striking picture, titled “Medusa ballet,” depicts jellyfish in the Spanish lagoon of Mar Menor.

“Through the illusion of a swarm of jellyfish, [the photo] evokes associations with a trend we can observe everywhere in heavily overexploited seas,” says Prof. Dr. Beate Jessel, the patron of the competition and President of Federal Agency for Nature Conservation. “Marine ecosystems that are no longer unimpaired and the warming seas as a result of climate change are promoting the increase of individual species.”

Fitor has long been concerned with the aquatic ecosystems of our planet and believes in the power of photography to initiate necessary changes and address environmental problems.

Below are the winners of the other individual categories:

Birds

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 9
Photo by Terje Koolas | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Mammals

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 10
Photo by Danny Green | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Other Animals

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 11
Photo by Jan Pedersen | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Plants and Fungi

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 12
Photo by Tobias Richter | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Landscapes

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 13
Photo by Anette Moosbacher | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

The Underwater World

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 14
Photo by Fabrice Guerin | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

People and Nature

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 15
Photo by Magnus Lundgren | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Nature’s Studio

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 16
Photo by Francis de Andrés | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Young Photographers Up to 14 Years

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 17
Photo by Andrés Domínguez Blanco | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Young Photographers 15-17 Years

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 18
Photo by Lasse Kurkela | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Fritz Pölking Prize

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 19
Photo by Jasper Doest from project “Nsenene” | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

Fritz Pölking Junior Prize

Graceful Photo of Jellyfish Wins Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021 20
Photo by Emile Séchaud from portfolio “Kingdom of the Ibex” | GDT Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2021

The full list of winners and runners-up of this year’s contest can be found on the GDT’s website.


Image credits: All photos individually credited and provided courtesy of GDT.

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