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The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced

The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced

Ouch!

 

The funniest and most popular photography competition in the world – The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2021 has reached its conclusion and is proud to announce that the Overall Winner of this year’s competition is Ken Jensen, a keen amateur photographer from Blackburn for his amazing photograph entitled ‘Ouch!’

The Competition Winners were revealed on BBC’s ‘The One Show’ in front of millions of viewers, a first for the competition that has seen its popularity grow and grow despite only being created 7 years ago. Up against 7,000 hilarious entries from across the globe, Ken’s image of a Golden Silk Monkey, looking a little more than uncomfortable, just pipped the others photos to the top title.

 

Otters

 

The winning image was captured on the bridge that runs over the river Xun in the Lonsheng Gorge, Yunnan, in China during a family holiday in 2016. The monkeys roam freely in the forest area, playing on the bridge in family groups and are very inquisitive of humans and not at all shy. This particular male monkey was actually showing a sign of aggression as he sat on one of the supporting wires, but as Ken’s fabulous shot shows – timing is everything.

Commenting on the good news, Ken said: “I was absolutely overwhelmed to learn that my entry had won, especially when there were quite a number of wonderful photos entered. The publicity that my image has received over the last few months has been incredible, it is such a great feeling to know that one’s image is making people smile globally as well as helping to support some fantastically worthwhile conservation causes.

I would like to say a really big thank you to everyone who has enjoyed or voted for my image and would also like to thank the competition organisers without whom it would not have been possible. And I absolutely love the trophy!

Finally, I want to thank my wife Min, for the support and encouragement that she provides in my photography adventures.”

 

Ninja Prairie Dog

 

As 2021 Comedy Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Ken wins a once in a lifetime safari in the Masai Mara, Kenya, with Alex Walker’s Serian, a unique handmade trophy from the Wonder Workshop in Tanzania, a photography bag from THINK TANK and a Goofie Bag brimming with goodies.

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards was co-founded in 2015 by professional photographers Paul Joynson-Hicks MBE and Tom Sullam who wanted to create a competition that focused on the lighter side of wildlife photography and help promote wildlife conservation through humour. This year, the competition is supporting Save Wild Orangutans by donating 10% of its total net revenue to the charity. The initiative safeguards wild orangutans in and around Gunung Palung National Park, Borneo.

 

Fish jumping

 

The Animals of the Land Category Award was won by Arthur Trevino with ‘Ninja Prairie Dog’ for his stunning photo of a majestic bald eagle seemingly being startled and deterred by a brave little prairie dog. Arthur has confirmed the dog managed to flee to fight another day.

Other category winners included Chee Kee Teo’s hilarious shot ‘Time for School’ of a smooth-coated young otter and his mother that took Creatures of the Water Award. Chee has captured a very bemused expression (familiar to all parents worldwide) as mum encourages the youngster to get into the water. Vicki Jauron, a regular entrant to the competition was awarded the Portfolio Award for ‘The Joys of a Mud Bath’ a series of 4 wonderful images depicting a playful young elephant having fun in the mud in Matusadona Park, Zimbabwe. This year, the winner of the Video Category Award was Rahul Lakhmani whose awesome clip entitled ‘Hugging Best Friend after Lockdown’ shows a white-throated Kingfisher in Delhi swooping in topple another one, in what looks like an over-enthusiastic hug!

 

Racoons

 

In addition to the Category Winners, there were 10 entries that were recognised as Highly Commended Winners: Andy Parkinson, Chu Han Lin, David Eppley, Gurumoorthy K, Jakub Hodan, Jan Piecha, Lea Scaddan, Nicolas de Vaulx, Pal Marchhart and Roland Kranitz.

For more information, visit the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards website. 

 

The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced 1

 

Pigeon

 

The Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards 2021 Winners Announced 2

 

Elephant

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DxO ‘Lines & Circles’ Photography Competition Winners Announced

DxO 'Lines & Circles' Photography Competition Winners Announced

Find out who has won a copy of DxO’s new PhotoLab 5 or FilmPack 6 software in our latest photography competition.

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Competitions

PhotoLab 5

 

We teamed up with DxO to give you the chance of winning 1 of 3 copies of either PhotoLab 5 or FilmPack 6 software and the winners have now been chosen. 

To be in with a chance of winning, all you had to do was submit an image which fitted the theme ‘Lines & Circles’ over in our competition forum and you didn’t disappoint! 

 

Winners Of DxO PhotoLab 5

 

 

 

 

Winners Of DxO FilmPack 6 

 

 

Time and Time Again

 

Plenty O Circles

 

For more chances to win, head over to our competition forum where there are daily challenges as well as photography competitions sponsored by well-known industry brands. 

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Calibrite ‘Autumn’ Photography Competition Winners Announced

Calibrite 'Autumn' Photography Competition Winners Announced

Find out if you’re one of the lucky winners of our ‘Autumn’ photography competition where Calibrite were giving away 2 ColorChecker Display Pro devices.

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Competitions

Calibrite 'Autumn' Photography Competition Winners Announced 3

 

Our ‘Autumn’ photography competition, sponsored by our friends Calibrite, has now closed to entries and the two ePHOTOzine members who will win a ColorChecker Display Pro device have been chosen.

Congratulations go to ePz members kenwil and andyk who have both captured amazing ‘Autumn’ themed images that impressed the Calibrite team. 

Here are the winning images along with a few words on why the Calibrite team chose them: 

 

autumnal colour

 

“This is just such a beautiful shot capturing such a magnificent and autumnal landscape. The different tones in the colours of the trees, the mist, the mountains sum up autumn perfectly. A lovely shot!”

 

Autumn Stag Richmond Park London

 

“Again, the autumn colours are beautiful. It almost looks like a painting, and the composition of the photo is very satisfying. The sharp focus on the stag, with the soft mist in the background, makes the image stand out like the stag has stood proud for a portrait.”

 

Well done to our winners and we’d also like to congratulate the ePz members who made the competition shortlist below.

For more chances to win, head over to our competition forum where there are daily challenges as well as photography competitions sponsored by well-known industry brands. 

 

Shortlisted Entries: 

Glory in Death

 

Autumn riders

 

Autumnal Jay

 

 

 

 

Glory of Autumn

 

 

Winter is coming

 

Leaf

 

 

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 November 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 2 November 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

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Competitions

Tube Station

 

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to BydoR9 (day 10 – ‘Urban’) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 9

‘Trucks’

Trucking through Glencoe

 

Day 11

‘Product Photography’

 

Day 12

‘Outdoor Portraits At Night’

Balloon Burn

 

Day 13

‘Wide-Angle Landscape’

 

Day 14

‘Abstract Indoor Shots’

Victoria Square, Belfast. Christmas 2018

 

Day 15

‘Frost Photography’

 

Day 16

‘Colourful Architecture’

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery. 

 

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Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize announces winners

Untitled. From the series "Heimat (in quarantine)".

The Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize is one of the most prestigious portrait competitions around. The top prize is a whooping £15,000 and all the finalists are traditionally exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery in London (though it’s closed for renovations this year). The winners and finalists have just been announced, so let’s dig in. 

About the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize

Beck Brothers. From the series "End of an Era".
Beck Brothers. From the series “End of an Era”. © Joseph P. Smith

The Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize (sponsored by the global law firm) celebrates contemporary photographic portraits. There are no categories, though photographers are encouraged to enter a series of portraits related by theme or content. 

Really, according to the official rules, the only limits are:

“‘The photographs must be portraits. ‘Portrait’ may be interpreted in its widest sense, of ‘photography concerned with portraying people with an emphasis on their identity as individuals.’”

Jana with Izaan, 5 and Yaana, 2. London, 2020. From the series "Holding the Baby"
Jana with Izaan, 5 and Yaana, 2. London, 2020. From the series “Holding the Baby”. © Polly Braden

There are two rounds of judging. The first is online with digital copies of all the images. Photographers that make it through the first round are then invited to submit a printed copy of their image for further consideration. Those copies are hung in a gallery where the judges get together in person to view the portraits and decide on the finalists and winners. 

Mohamed Lappia, from the series "Flying Stars – the Amputee Footballers of Sierra Leone."
Mohamed Lappia. From the series “Flying Stars – the Amputee Footballers of Sierra Leone”. © Todd Antony

With so many photo competitions entirely online, it’s really cool to see such an art-forward approach. Some photos just need to be seen in person for you to feel their full effect. 

The winner: David Prichard

Merna Beasley, Kurtijar Woman. From the series "Tribute to Indigenous Stock Women."
Merna Beasley, Kurtijar Woman. From the series “Tribute to Indigenous Stock Women”. © David Prichard

David Prichard took the top prize (and£15,000) for his series of portraits on First Nation women who had spent their lives working on cattle stations in Northern Australia. 

According to Prichard, the cultural and social history of Indigenous “stock women” had largely gone unrecorded. In an interview accompanying his images online, he says, “‘One can only imagine what stock women endured, living in remote areas, in a world dominated by white colonial culture and law. I wanted to produce portraits that were dignified, strong and beautiful, and worthy to represent these women today and into the future.’”

We think he pulled it off perfectly. 

Second place: Pierre-Elie de Pibrac

Yuki San. From the series "Hakanai Sonzai.
Yuki San. From the series “Hakanai Sonzai”. © Pierre-Elie de Pibrac

French photographer Pierre-Elie de Pibrac won second prize (and £3,000) for his series of large-format portraits shot in Japan. 

Called Hakanai Sonzai, which translates as “I, myself, feel like an ephemeral creature,” the series documents “people who exhibited fortitude in the face of adversity.” Over eight-month, he traveled the country interviewing people and shooting portraits in places like Fukushima and Yubari, a former mining town.

“Each portrait emanates from long discussions I had with my subjects about a painful event in their lives,” Pibrac says in his accompanying interview. “In all the pictures I forbid any movement as if they are trapped by their surroundings with no visible escape.”

Third place: Katya Ilina

David. From the series "Rosemary & Thyme".
David. From the series “Rosemary & Thyme”. © Katya Ilina

Katya Ilina, a Russian-born but Toronto-based photographer, took third place (and £2,000) for her portrait called David. Her work plays with gender norms in art and this particular photo is a nod to Titian’s Venus of Urbino

“From Velázquez to Ingres, painters have portrayed men in positions of power, or as muscular heroes in battle, whereas females are often pictured naked and reclining, communicating softness, weakness and openness to gaze,” explains Ilina in her interview. “I wanted to borrow the so-called feminine body language from those paintings and juxtapose it with male sitters.”

How to view the finalists

An Armenian combatant is admitted to the emergency department of Stepanakert hospital from the series "Conflict and Covid-19 in Nagorno-Karabakh".
An Armenian combatant is admitted to the emergency department of Stepanakert hospital
from the series “Conflict and Covid-19 in Nagorno-Karabakh”. © Anastasia Taylor-Lind

The judges selected a total of 54 portraits from 25 artists to display. The can be seen in person between now and early January 2022, in Cromwell Place, London. You can also check out all the finalists online and vote for the People’s Pick.

There are no details yet on how to enter next year’s competition. If you’re interested, we’d suggest you keep an eye on the National Portrait Gallery’s site as that’s where it will be announced first.

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Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners

November 10, 2021

Winners and finalists of Landscape Photographer of the Year 2021 (LPOTY) share their top tips for award-winning landscape photographs


Now in its 14th year, Landscape Photographer of the Year 2021 (LPOTY) once more showcases and celebrates the richly diverse landscape of the UK. From dramatic storms and raging seas to the quieter joys of misty woodlands and close-ups of nature’s fascinating details, the winning photographs in this year’s competition not only display the talent of their creators but also inspire visitors to explore and discover the wonders of Britain’s countryside.

With a beautiful shot, ‘Morning at Countryside’, taken in West Sussex, Mara Leite scoops the prestigious title of Overall Winner and receives the £10,000 top prize in this year’s competition. Charlie Waite, the awards founder says, ‘With the glorious ring lighting and a splash of golden light at the top, there is a sense of security and protection as much as secrecy that emerges from this delicate photograph where we are beckoned to go forward.’

The Young Landscape Photographer of the Year title goes to Evie Easterbrook for her image ‘Joining the Queue’ taken in Southwold Harbour. Charlie Waite says, ‘The humour in this photograph is wonderfully conveyed and seems reminiscent of an earlier time, perhaps the fifties, and embraces a piece of classic Britain.’

This year there were seven categories and special awards: Classic View, Your View, Urban Life, Black and White, The Network Rail Award for Lines in the Landscape, The Sunday Times Magazine Award for Historic Britain and the Light and Land Award for Landscapes at Night, as well as Young LPOTY.

An exhibition of shortlisted and winning LPOTY 2021 entries will premiere at London Bridge on 15 November and run until 9 January 2022. A tour of the UK will follow. To see all the winners and awarded entries from this year’s Landscape Photographer of the Year competition, visit www.lpoty.co.uk.

lpoty logo


Mara Leite, Morning at Countryside

LPOTY 2021 Overall Winner

www.maraleitephotography.com, www.facebook.com/maralphoto, Instagram @maralphoto, Twitter @TheMNVL

lpoty overall winner

Mara Leite, Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 70-300mm, 1/60sec at f/10, ISO 800

‘Mill Lane is a famous footpath in Halnaker, West Sussex. I was looking for a different composition when I decided to turn the other way and saw this beautiful sight. I love the gate in the background and how the morning light is hitting the leaves and softly entering the tunnel.’

Mara’s top tips

1. Have an idea of the time of day/year you want to photograph your subject and monitor the weather. I found social media a good tool for tracking the progression of autumn.
2. Light is important; if you want to master exposure, learn how to read your camera’s histogram.
3. Don’t overdo it in post-processing. Make subtle changes that add drama and simultaneously reflect your photography style and other work.


Evie Easterbrook, Joining the Queue

LPOTY 2021 Overall Youth Winner

young lpoty winner

Evie Easterbrook. Sony DSC-HX400V, 24-210mm, 1/2000sec at f/6.3, ISO 800

‘I took this photograph at Southwold harbour in Suffolk. I was surprised to see the gulls forming such an orderly queue!’

Evie’s top tips

1. Always have your camera nearby. You can never be certain when something interesting will come into view or for how long the subject matter will be at its best.
2. Be patient. It is always worth taking the time to ensure you have the right composition. Small adjustments in angles, composition or lighting can make a big difference.
3. You don’t have to be an expert. Although there is always more to learn, limited technical knowledge need not hold you back – just enjoy your photography and don’t worry about making mistakes.


Philip George, Chesterton Windmill

Winner, Classic View

Flickr @PhilipGeorge

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 4

Philip George. Fujifilm X-T30, 10-24mm, 1/140sec at f/7.1, ISO 160

‘I was returning from Birmingham to Southampton and decided to take a detour to Chesterton Windmill as the skies looked good. I have been there quite a few times before in the hope of getting a good sky. This was taken quite late in the afternoon. There were quite a few people at the windmill, so I tried to find an angle to eliminate the people from the pictures.

I finally found a low viewpoint in the barley field, with just a hint of a leading line to the windmill. I used a polarising filter to deepen the blue skies and bring out the wonderful clouds.’

Philip’s top tips

1. Visit a location frequently and spend time looking at it from different angles. You don’t always want the same image as everyone else.
2. Get out and about and find locations for yourself. Make a point of visiting with the intention of taking a photograph.
3. I love to look for the right sky overhead. Sunrise, or sunset, from dawn to dusk, there is plenty of changeable weather that makes the British Isles such a great place to take photographs.


Miles Middlebrook, Daybreak beside the River Brathay

Winner, Black and White

www.buildingpanoramics.com, 500px @Miles Middlebrook

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 5

Miles Middlebrook. Canon EOS 5DS, 85mm, 1/125sec at f/7.1, ISO 200

‘I was staying at one of my favourite places, Skelwith Bridge which is situated beside the rather beautiful River Brathay. Thanks to my dog for getting me up early one morning, we were greeted by a magical scene as the first light caught the river, lifting mist from the surface and hanging among the trees.’

Miles’s top tips

1. Visualise the kind of images you want to capture and then work towards making that happen.
2. I avoid the use of wideangle lenses because often in my case I find the main focal point of the image can be too small and insignificant in the frame.
3. Have someone whose judgement you trust to critique your shots in order to get the most out of your photography. In my case I have my brother, Mark, with whom I share Building Panoramics.


James Whitesmith, Malham Zig Zag

Highly Commended, Your View

www.jameswhitesmith.co.uk, Instagram @james.whitesmith

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 6

James Whitesmith. Sony A7R II, 24-105mm, 1/10sec at f/11, ISO 100

‘Traditional dry stone walls zig zag across the fields beneath Malham Lings in the Yorkshire Dales, as the rising sun begins to light the scene. I arrived on location well before sunrise and the entire valley was filled with thick fog, but as the minutes ticked by it began to shift and retreat.

This particular scene caught my eye and fortunately the swirling mist revealed the copse at the decisive moment with the first direct light washing over the landscape.’

James’s top tips

1. When you arrive at a location don’t just make a beeline for the obvious subject and composition. Take time to explore and experiment with different focal lengths and camera position.
2. Sometimes a scene can be transformed in an instant, particularly in changeable weather or mist. Keep tweaking your composition as the light changes.


Tommaso Carrara, Piccadilly Circus

Runner up, Urban View

www.gettons.org, Instagram @gettons

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 7

Tommaso Carrara. Fuji X-T3, 35mm, 1/250sec at f/1.4, ISO 160

‘The silhouette of a man smoking a cigarette catches my attention as a double-decker cuts through the road with the advertising boards on the back. This trilogy made of human, adverts and transportation is, to me, amongst the essence of this city.’

Tommaso’s top tips

1. Pre-visualise the composition and look for an appropriate background. This is normally the less dynamic part of the image and is unlikely to change.
2. Once you’re happy with the background, think about all those elements that could add to the frame and whether they are static or not. Once all those elements come together take multiple shots, as you never know what might happen next.


Jason Hudson, Braithwaite

Commended, Landscapes at Night

Twitter @Edenphotograph1, Instagram @jasonhudson142

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 8

Jason Hudson. Sony A7R III, 24-70mm

‘A pre-dawn climb up Grisdale Pike in the Lake District was the setting for this shot. I noticed the light trails through the mist and thought it would make a compelling image.’

Jason’s top tips

1. If you want dramatic photos go out in dramatic weather but keep an eye out for storm warnings. Make sure both you and your camera are protected from the elements.
2. If you see nice light make a note of the time and location. The likelihood is that conditions may repeat over the following days. Head out and search for compositions and you may get the shot you are after.
3. Observe the weather and try to predict changes in the rain and light. It is possible to anticipate rainbow positions in advance of them appearing so start looking for compositions before they appear.


Arthur Homewood, Christmas Eve at Saunton

Winner, Black and White Youth

Instagram @rt_hwd

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 9

Arthur Homewood. Fuji X-T2, 18-55mm, 1/240sec at f/8, ISO 400

‘The fog is my favourite condition to shoot in due to the potential for minimalistic compositions and the way the background appears to go on indefinitely. On Christmas Eve 2018 my family and I went to Saunton Sands for a walk but when we arrived the foggy conditions were unlike anything that I had seen before on the beach.

I moved toward the coastline and after a short time these children came running up to play in the shallow water. They made for perfect subjects as they were extremely energetic, running on excitement for the following day.’

Arthur’s top tips

1. Revisit the same locations to get familiar with the conditions that work best.
2. Don’t be afraid to shoot candid photos of people despite it being a landscape; they give a great sense of scale.


Tomasz Rojek, Dunnottar Castle

Commended, Historic Britain

Facebook/Instagram @tomaszrojekphotography, www.tomaszrojek.pl

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 10

Tomasz Rojek. Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, 12-24mm, 1/40sec at f/13, ISO 100

‘The photo was taken during my trip to Scotland in May 2019. This is Dunnottar Castle during the sunrise. The man in the upper right corner shows the scale of the landscape.’

Tomasz’s top tips

1. Landscape photography involves a lot of planning. You should have a clear idea of where you are going, and at what time of the day you will be able to capture the best light.
2. The best light for landscape photography is usually during sunset and sunrise and about one hour after. Make sure you arrive early to find your shooting spot, set up your camera and compose your scene.
3. Be patient and persistent. You will come back from many trips without interesting photos but this should not discourage you from further expeditions.


Kathy Medcalf, Convoy

Commended, Lines in the Landscape

www.fineart-landscapes.co.uk, Instagram @fineartlandscapes

Top tips for award-winning landscapes from LPOTY 2021 winners 11

Kathy Medcalf. Hasselblad L1D-20c, 28mm, 1/100sec at f/2.8, ISO 100

‘Aerial view of coal trains in a train yard. I spotted this location on Google Earth and decided to do some research into it. I visited on a day when the rail was closed and I hoped the trains would be in the yard. The light and time of day played a big part too as I didn’t want shadow to overwhelm the main focus.’

Kathy’s top tips

1. Always research the area that you are planning on photographing. Use Google Earth to find good viewpoints and beautiful areas of interest.
2. Light is an important factor when it comes to shooting your subject. Shooting at ‘golden hour’ gives you dramatic contrast with shadows that help to bring out detail.
3. Look for unique perspectives. Be creative and experiment with different viewpoints.


Landscape Photographer of the Year Collection 14 is published on 28 October by Ilex. Hardback. £26.

lpoty book


Further reading

Landscape Photographer of the Year 2021

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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 November 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 November 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Falafel

© SlowSong

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to SlowSong (Day 05 – Photo Walk ) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 01

‘National Parks’

Castlerigg

 

Day 02

‘Win’

 

Day 03

‘Fireworks’

 

Day 04

‘Races’

 

Day 06

‘Creative White Balance’

 

Day 07

‘Panoramas’

 

Day 08

‘Poppy’

Poppies

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery. 

 

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A picture, a moment can change the way we feel. Change how we see ourselves. Change our understanding and change the rules. Provoke and change history.


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Sell the kit you’re not using to MPB. Trade in for the kit you need to create. Buy used, spend less and get more.

Buy. Sell. Trade. Create.


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ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 November 2021

ePHOTOzine Daily Competition Challenge Winners Week 1 November 2021

Find out who has won a 32GB MicroSD card with SD adapter courtesy of Samsung in our latest Daily competition challenges.

| 
Competitions

Falafel

© SlowSong

 

Winner!

The latest winners of our popular daily photography competition which takes place in our forums have been chosen and congratulations go to SlowSong (Day 05 – Photo Walk ) who wins a Samsung 32GB Micro SD card courtesy of Samsung. This class 10 UHS 1 Grade U1 card offers read speeds 95MB/s and write speeds of 20MB/s. There’s a 10-year warranty included, and the card comes with Samsung’s 4-proof technology: water, X-ray, Magnet and temperature. The included SD adapter allows you to use the card across multiple devices.

 

Daily Competition Runners-Up

If you didn’t win this time, keep uploading your images to the daily competition forum for another chance to win! If you’re new to the Daily Competition, you can find out more about it in the Daily Competition Q&A. Please note that due to the current situation, there will be a delay in sending prizes out. 

 Well done to our latest runners-up, too, whose images you can take a look at below. 

 

Day 01

National Parks

Castlerigg

 

Day 02

Win

 

Day 03

Fireworks

 

Day 04

Races

 

Day 06

Creative White Balance

 

Day 07

Panoramas

 

Day 08

Poppy

Poppies

 

Another Prize To Be Won

You’ll find the Daily Competitions, along with other great photo competitions, over in our Forum where you can win great prizes and see the latest daily photo contests. Open to all levels of photographer, you’re sure to find a photography competition that you can enter. Why not share details of competitions with our community? POTW winners also receive a Samsung memory card but this memory card is an EVO Plus 64GB MicroSDXC card with SD Adapter. To be in with a chance of winning, simply upload an image to our Gallery

 

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Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021 Winners

Flood, Michele Lapini, 2020. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

November 8, 2021

The Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021 winners have been announced! In its 14th year, the Environmental Photographer of the Year (EPOTY) competition showcases inspirational environmental photography from around the world. The award celebrates humanity, and highlights thought-provoking images that bring attention to our impact on the planet.

The photography competition is free to enter for all ages, with entries opened on 21 March 2021, and closing on 14 August 2021. The winners have been announced during the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26).

EPOTY 2021 recieved over 7000 images from photographers in over 120 nations. It is presented by CIWEM, and waterbear, in partnership with Nikon, and is sponsored by ARUP.

The categories for the competition are:

  • Environmental Photographer of the Year
  • Young Environmental Photographer of the Year
  • Environments of the Future
  • Sustainable Cities
  • Climate Action
  • Water and Security
  • The Resilient Award
  • People’s Choice

The competition prizes include £10,000 in cash and award certificate, plus coverage in a number of publications for the overall winner, and there was also a Nikon Z camera and 3 lenses available for the Young Environmental Photographer of the Year.

People’s Choice Award Voting is now open – The voting for the People’s Choice Award is now open to the public via social media. To vote, please visit EPOTY on Instagram.


Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021 Competition Winners revealed at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow

Monday 8th November 2021. 26th Conference of Parties (COP26), Glasgow, Scotland. Environmental and water management charity CIWEM, free streaming platform dedicated to the future of our planet WaterBear, the world’s largest B Corp Natura &Co, Nikon, and engineering company ARUP have today announced the Environmental Photographer Of The Year 2021 competition’s winners at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow

Now in its 14th year, the Environmental Photographer Of The Year competition showcases some of the world’s most inspirational environmental photography. The annual competition provides an international platform to raise awareness for the environmental issues that put our planet at risk.

Spanish photographer Antonio Aragón Renuncio has won the coveted prize of Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021 for his photo titled “The rising tide sons”, which shows a child sleeping inside his house destroyed by coastal erosion on Afiadenyigba beach in Ghana. The photo shines a spotlight on the rising sea-levels in West-African countries, forcing thousands of people to leave their homes.

Here is the full list of the winning photographs and winners of this year’s competition.

Environmental Photographer of the Year:

The rising tide sons, Antonio Aragon Renuncio, 2019. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

The rising tide sons, Antonio Aragon Renuncio, 2019. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

“A child sleeps on the floor of his house about to collapse, destroyed by coastal erosion on Afidegnigba beach. Sea levels off the coast of Togo and other West African countries continue to rise and swallow up everything in their path. Homes, crops, roads, trees, schools, jobs, resources… lives. However, the shore of this small country in the Gulf of Guinea is only one part of the massive problem that affects more than 8,000 kilometers of seacoast in 13 West African countries. Punished by global warming, rising sea levels are forcing the ocean floor to readjust by removing sediment from the coast and washing it away from the shore. This causes marine erosion capable of devouring dozens of meters of land each year. As a result of this environmental global problem, thousands of people (mainly women and children) have already been forced to leave their homes and migrate inland in search of food, shelter and to avoid a certain death… Many thousands more await their inexorable future… That next rising tide that takes everything away.”

A child sleeps inside his house destroyed by coastal erosion on Afiadenyigba beach. Sea-levels in West-African countries continue to rise and thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes.

  • Location: Togo, West Africa
  • Camera: Sony Alpha A7 III

Young Environmental Photographer of the Year – Nikon Award:

Inferno, Amaan Ali, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Inferno, Amaan Ali, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

A boy fighting surface fires in a forest near his home in Yamuna Ghat, New Delhi, India. According to locals, forest fires caused by human activity in the area are a common occurrence due to adverse living conditions.

  • Location: New Delhi, India
  • Camera: Nikon D750

Environments of the Future:

Flood, Michele Lapini, 2020. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Flood, Michele Lapini, 2020. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021. An aerial view of the Panaro river’s flooding near Modena, Italy.

A house is submerged by the flooding of the River Panaro in the Po Valley due to heavy rainfall and melting snow.

  • Location: Nonantola, Modena, Italy
  • Camera: Hasselblad L1D-20c / DJI Mavic 2 Pro.

Sustainable Cities:

Net-zero transition - Photobioreactor, Simone Tramonte, 2020. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Net-zero transition – Photobioreactor, Simone Tramonte, 2020. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

“A photobioreactor at Algalif facilities in Reykjanesbaer, Iceland. Algalif plant produces sustainable astaxanthin from micro-algae using 100% clean geothermal energy. In the Starvation Phase, the algae culture is exposed to UV light to cause stress conditions and induce astaxanthin synthesis. The proprietary lighting system enables Algalif to reduce overall energy consumption by 50%, in addition to providing for optimal microalgae growth, productivity and yield. The production methods allow for 0% water evaporation, while some manufacturers lose up to 20% of water per day. Algalif doesn’t have to cool, heat, or move water during our production process, allowing us to conserve water.”

A photobioreactor at Algalif ’s facilities produces sustainable astaxanthin products. Iceland has shifted from fossil fuels to 100% of electricity and heat from renewable sources.

  • Location: Reykjanesbaer, Iceland
  • Camera: Nikon D810

Climate Action:

The Last breath, Kevin Ochieng Onyango, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

The Last breath, Kevin Ochieng Onyango, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

”Theme: Nature-based solutions to climate change’ – The image is of a young boy holding a tree seedling with one of its leaf wrapped on a polythene bag, a straw comes out seemingly from his nostrils to the bag as though is giving it air. He is in an unhealthy atmosphere as a sandstorm brews behind. The image symbolises that human beings are the only force of nature left to salvage the earth from drastic climate change and save the ozone layer from being totally destroyed. It is up to us to give rise to trees which are water catchment areas by nurturing their seedlings and planting them, in doing so, they help stop climate change by removing carbon(iv) oxide from the air, storing the carbon in trees and soil, and releasing oxygen into the  atmosphere. Hence creating a conducive environment for life and nature as a whole.”

A boy takes in air from the plant, with a sand storm brewing in the background. This is an impression of the changes to come.

  • Location: Nairobi, Kenya
  • Camera: Nikon D7200

Water and Security:

Green barrier, Sandipani Chattopadhyay, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Green barrier, Sandipani Chattopadhyay, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Irregular monsoon seasons and droughts cause algal bloom on the Damodar river. Algal blooms prevent light from penetrating the surface and prevent oxygen absorbtion by the organisms beneath, impacting human health and habitats in the area.

  • Location: West Bengal, India
  • Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

The Resilient Award:

Survive for alive, Ashraful Islam, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Survive for alive, Ashraful Islam, 2021. By courtesy of the photographer and Environmental Photographer of the Year 2021.

Flocks of sheep search for grass amongst the cracked soil. Extreme droughts in Bangladesh have created hardships for all living beings.

  • Location: Noakhali, Bangladesh
  • Camera: Hasselblad L1D-20c / DJI Mavic 2 Pro.

The voting for the People’s Choice Award is now open to the public via social media. To vote, please visit www.instagram.com/environmental_photographer_oty.

To learn more about The Environmental Photographer of the Year winners, visit www.epoty.org.

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2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners

2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners

Why does the world need another landscape photography competition? Well, the Natural Landscape Photography Awards, the first competition of its kind, aims to promote landscape photographers who strive for realism and authenticity in their images.


This new competition has established important parameters for entry images that restrict certain digital editing techniques and compositing. The result is an inspiring showcase of images from a talented array of photographers who aim to stay true to the natural beauty of the landscape. 

2021 marking its inaugural year, the Natural Landscape Photography Awards was founded by Matt Payne, Tim Parkin, Alex Nail, and Rajesh Jyothiswaran. As talented and acclaimed photographers in their own right, they wanted to create a place where the in-field talent of photographers is celebrated, and where post-processing is applied in a way that remains true to the scene experienced. 

One of photography’s unique features is its ability to clearly represent the visual experience of
the world. The competitions we see online sometimes reward the technical skills of post-
processing, compositing and graphic design over the challenges of working within the limits of the real world. -Matt Payne, Founder

 The competition has been a massive success for its first year, with 13,368 photographs submitted by over 1,300 photographers from 47 countries around the world. The judging panel consists of eight industry leaders, including world-renowned photographers Joe Cornish and William Neill, who all share the vision and values of the competition’s founders. 

Photographer of the Year, Winner: Eric Bennett 

Eric Bennett, the winner of Photographer of the Year, had this to say regarding the competition: 

As a photographer who strives to show people the value of wilderness, I have always enjoyed seeing and creating more subtle and personal photographs that portray nature in a realistic manner. As these kinds of images tend to have a quieter impact, they often end up being largely ignored in most photography competitions. This is why I have not entered many competitions in the past, since I felt my artwork would be judged based on factors that I do not value myself.

However, I decided to submit my photographs for the Natural Landscape Awards because I liked that the competition was focused on awarding images based on composition, lighting, and originality as opposed to post-processing techniques or outlandish compositing. I had no idea that I would end up receiving the Photographer of the Year Award, as the intent behind entering was only to show my support.

To be given this award by such a prestigious and well respected group of photographers whom I have always looked up to is a great honor for me. I hope that the Natural Landscape Awards can continue for many years to come, remain true to its values, and also inspire other photography competitions to award photographers based on similar principles of artistry.

 Photograph of the Year, Winner: Steve Alterman 

2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners 12

Landscapes come in many sizes. Sometimes the best images are literally at your feet! Fellsfjara is the black sand beach opposite the famous glacial lagoon in southeastern Iceland. As icebergs from the lagoon wash out to sea, many of them are stranded on the beach, destined to melt away. Early one morning, I encountered a small, fairly flat, iceberg close to the ocean. Small waves occasionally broke over it and disappeared into the black sand. After watching this particular scene for a few minutes, I noticed that the early morning sun sparkled on the small pebbles on the beach and that the tip of the iceberg, coupled with the small orange rock and the pebbles, created a stunning graphic. Maneuvering the tripod and camera into a position to capture the scene was a bit of a challenge, but happily, in the end, it worked out nicely.

Grand Landscape, Winner: Michael Frye 

2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners 13

I’ve lived in or near Yosemite for over 35 years, so I know the park intimately, and have photographed it in every season, in almost every conceivable weather.

After so many years, it can be challenging to find fresh ways of photographing this place. I’m often photographing more intimate views of Yosemite, because there’s an infinite variety of subject matter to work with. I’ve also made many photographs of Yosemite at night.

But I’ve also tried to photograph grand landscapes of Yosemite Valley from different perspectives. The classic views are classic for a reason – they work. But I thought that surely there must be some other spots that would also work, where the landforms would fit together in a pleasing way – and where the view wouldn’t be blocked by trees!

I had visited this view of El Capitan on perhaps a dozen occasions, hoping for some exceptional light. Usually I had gone home disappointed. But on this March afternoon, after a small snow squall moved through the valley, I was treated to some of the most beautiful light and mist I’ve ever seen on El Cap.

Intimate and Abstract, Winner: Franka Gabler

2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners 14

Every autumn I make several trips to the Eastern Sierra Nevada mountains to photograph the change of seasons. The mountain pass I use to drive there is usually open until the end of October – when it closes for the season. The weather plays an important role and influences how fall colors develop, so the vegetation looks slightly different every year.

One of my favorite scenes to photograph is when aspen trees are almost bare – their fair bark glows, and the surrounding vegetation has a chance to show off its subtle hues. On this crisp autumn morning, I was drawn to this quiet scene, observing nature preparing for rest. I was alone, at dawn, waiting for light to become bright enough to capture subtle colors and textures. There was just a tiny amount of yellow foliage left on the aspen trees, adding a discrete splash of warm color, contrasting mostly cool hues of the Sierra willow brush.

The scene made me feel melancholic – that’s why I titled the photograph “Autumn Blues.”

2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners 15

The 30 minutes spent taking this image was like no other time with a camera.

Setting up my tripod as thunder boomed around me, hopes of getting an image turned to excitement as the storm moved over the Matterhorn.

I was briefly frustrated trying to nail focus and settings in the dark. Occasional flashes of nearby lightning helped me recompose, refine focus and adjust settings. But I cursed each of them as a missed opportunity to get a shot. Once happy with the camera set up, I could take time to fire off numerous 10 second exposures and just watch the show.

Each lightning strike gave me the shivers. When these two hit the summit, I knew I had something special in the camera.

Excitement, awe, relief, pride. All in 30 minutes. This range of emotion is rare when taking a landscape image. I’m very lucky to have both witnessed the event and captured it with a camera.

2021 Natural Landscape Photography Awards: The Winners 16

There’s something about taking to wing and leaving the normal plane you travel on that allows you to create a whole new perspective and relationship with the landscape around you, particularly in the vast desert areas of Australia where this image was taken. It is the flattest continent on earth and from the ground it can stretch into an almost featureless plane. As you rise into the sky all its remarkable structures and hidden intricacies begin to reveal themselves in greater complexity and depth. The true immensity of the landscape, interconnectivity of nature and perhaps even an echo of the dreamtime stories of its creation are brought to light.

By taking the horizon away and any sense of scale, as I’ve done here, the viewer is invited to move away from their more literal mind into more figurative paths of interpretation. Positioning a fixed wing aircraft into just the right angle over your chosen subject can be a difficult task at times, with many factors coming into play, but that makes it all the more satisfying when all the elements come into place. The image presented here as you see it, is basically straight out of camera.

Youth, Winner: Jai Shet 

I took this picture in Joshua Tree National Park in May 2021. Among a group of Joshua trees, I spotted one of them was missing a branch which made for a perfect place to align the moon. In my photo, the tree appeared to hold the moon like a lantern, using its ghostly light to reveal the landscape. The silhouettes of background Joshua trees seemed to subtly lean in toward the moon as though they desired to hold it themselves.

ASH documents unprecedented fires in Tasmania from 2019. Areas photographed include Hartz Mountains National Park, Franklin Gordon River National Park, Great Lakes, and Tasmania’s East Coast. The project documents the destruction of these fires, the thin line between survival and destruction, and the re-emergence of life, albeit affected by a habitat that has lost many fire vulnerable species.

As you can see, the winning images are inspiring examples of how nature can be stunning and surreal without the aid of unnatural and overblown editing techniques. That being said, the purpose of this competition is not to disparage any particular style or art form. Everyone is entitled to create their art in whatever mode inspires them. This competition is nothing more than the founders’ attempt at recognizing the incredible work of photographers who may have been overlooked on popular photo-sharing websites due to a more subtle and restrained processing style. We should all be excited to see the influence this competition will have on the art of landscape photography in years to come. Be sure to check out the NLPA website to view the full competition results, including runners-up and founder’s awards! 

All images used with permission

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